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Author Topic: Legal Market in 5 years  (Read 1408 times)

SoulinNeed

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Legal Market in 5 years
« on: August 28, 2009, 05:44:03 PM »
Hey, I've always wanted be a lawyer, I've done internships and it's only increased my desire. I've also never had ridiculous dreams about big law, all I've wanted to be is a public defender in Cook County (or anywhere really). Unfortunately, the news I've been hearing lately has really been killing me. I'm 1.5 years from graduating from college, and I'm 5 years away from graduating law school. I currently have a 3.95 GPA and I've been practicing in the mid to high 160s. I know I won't get top14, but I should have a good shot at top 30, at the very least. I've always been a hard worker, but that doesn't mean anything I guess. The recession hit, times got hard, but I always counted on things improving in the legal field in 5 years. Now, though, people keep telling me the opposite. I'm honestly unsure of what to do, and I was wondering if you guys had any views on how the legal field will be in 5 years?

Changed Name

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Re: Legal Market in 5 years
« Reply #1 on: August 28, 2009, 06:04:49 PM »
Tip:  look at your audience.

These boards are frequented mostly by (1) pre-law students and (2) law students.

You are asking a question about predicting a field which most of us are, at best, hoping to be in at some point.  Further, your question probably couldn't be answered with any certainty from an expert in the law field or an expert in economics.

If you want to be a lawyer, go to law school.  That may be overly simple, of course.  There are other factors to consider like money, etc but that should be your underlying reason to go.  Don't go to law school thinking that it's a ticket to a big paycheck, because it certainly isn't.  If you are risk averse, go to law school on the cheap.  With a 3.95 and say a 165, you'll have a good shot at get full-rides to schools. 

IPFreely

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Re: Legal Market in 5 years
« Reply #2 on: August 29, 2009, 01:30:28 PM »
After the dissolution of the United States in 2011, most regions will resort to civil warfare to divide the spoils.  I expect that the industrial midwest band from roughly Chicago through Ohio, and including Michigan, will be the scene of some of the heaviest fighting.  Whatever government control remains in these areas will likely have a high need for public defenders, although you will probably be paid in scrap metal.  Even so, your school debt will evaporate thanks to the disappearance of the dollar, so it's all good.

SASS

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Re: Legal Market in 5 years
« Reply #3 on: August 29, 2009, 02:24:26 PM »
After the dissolution of the United States in 2011, most regions will resort to civil warfare to divide the spoils.  I expect that the industrial midwest band from roughly Chicago through Ohio, and including Michigan, will be the scene of some of the heaviest fighting.  Whatever government control remains in these areas will likely have a high need for public defenders, although you will probably be paid in scrap metal.  Even so, your school debt will evaporate thanks to the disappearance of the dollar, so it's all good.

 :D  I like your sense of humor.  Sounds like the script of an apocalyptic movie.

But a agree with a previous post, if you want to be a lawyer, go to law school.  The problem with law school is that there are too many students who went because they couldn't think of anything better to do.  Also, if your lsat is in the high 160's you may be able to get into on of the lower T14's but I would probably go to the school that gave you the most money in the T25 or so.  A 3.95 gpa carries a long way, I think.

Viking Quest

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Re: Legal Market in 5 years
« Reply #4 on: August 29, 2009, 06:33:53 PM »
>>>After the dissolution of the United States in 2011, most regions will resort to civil warfare to divide the spoils.  I expect that the industrial midwest band from roughly Chicago through Ohio, and including Michigan, will be the scene of some of the heaviest fighting.  Whatever government control remains in these areas will likely have a high need for public defenders, although you will probably be paid in scrap metal.  Even so, your school debt will evaporate thanks to the disappearance of the dollar, so it's all good.

This raises another important point -- choose the geographic area in which you want to go to law school carefully.  After the dissolution, I suspect that the IndustrialMIdwestistan will not accept a law degree from the region formerly known as California, for example. 

Ninja1

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Re: Legal Market in 5 years
« Reply #5 on: September 01, 2009, 02:54:09 AM »
With that GPA and an LSAT in the mid-high 160s, you can make a T14. Maybe not HYS, but G-Town or Cornell if nothing else.

The legal market in 5 years will, obviously, be either better, worse, or the same. But either way, you should still be cool:
- If it's better, great, you win.
- If it's the same, you at least break even based on the current environment. If nothing else, you'll get some kind of legal job, which is fine since you don't want big law.
- It it's worse, at least you'll still have a good pedigree under your belt and will still find rewarding employment. In a bad job market, the lowest of the low end (T4 and most T3 grads) will be the first to go. The T1/2, select T3s, and especially the T14, will still be good.
I'mma stay bumpin' till I bump my head on my tomb.

Burning Sands, Esq.

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Re: Legal Market in 5 years
« Reply #6 on: September 01, 2009, 11:29:03 AM »
Tip:  look at your audience.

These boards are frequented mostly by (1) pre-law students and (2) law students.

You are asking a question about predicting a field which most of us are, at best, hoping to be in at some point.  Further, your question probably couldn't be answered with any certainty from an expert in the law field or an expert in economics.

If you want to be a lawyer, go to law school.  That may be overly simple, of course.  There are other factors to consider like money, etc but that should be your underlying reason to go.  Don't go to law school thinking that it's a ticket to a big paycheck, because it certainly isn't.  If you are risk averse, go to law school on the cheap.  With a 3.95 and say a 165, you'll have a good shot at get full-rides to schools. 

Correct.  I've been practicing law for 2 years now (man time flies) and I can tell ya that none of us out here in the practice have any damn idea about when this thing is going to turn around.  The legal profession rises and falls with the economy, so in essence you're asking where the economy is going to be in 5 years.  Not even Greenspan has that crystal ball.
"A lawyer's either a social engineer or a parasite on society. A social engineer is a highly skilled...lawyer who understands the Constitution of the U.S. and knows how to explore its uses in the solving of problems of local communities and in bettering [our] conditions."
Charles H. Houston