Law School Discussion

$$$/Prestige Question

$$$/Prestige Question
« on: August 20, 2009, 10:25:16 AM »
I am relatively new to the Law School admissions process, and am looking at several different levels of schools.  I know you guys are going to tell me to get a real LSAT score before you'll "chance" me, but I'm looking for an answer to a more general question.

It seems that, even in the T14 schools, the difference between, for example, Yale and Duke, is pretty extreme, to the point where I've seen people advised that they could be waitlisted at Yale yet receive pretty substantial money from Duke.  So I guess the question is, how many places down the rankings does the scholarship money start showing up?  If you're admitted to Stanford, but barely, does that mean Texas is likely to offer money?  Or, further down the rankings, if you're admitted to Emory, but barely, is the scholarship money going to come from a school like Georgia State, or as far up the rankings as Alabama or Georgia?  I definitely know that every situation is different, but I'd just like some general guidelines in terms of what I should be looking for.

For anyone who may feel like guiding me personally, I have a 3.65 GPA from a decent State University, and have consistently been scoring 168-170 on practice LSATs.

Thanks!

Re: $$$/Prestige Question
« Reply #1 on: August 20, 2009, 10:38:15 AM »
HYS don't give any merit scholarships.  Columbia/NYU give some.  And the rest of the T14 give a reasonable amount.  And with scholarships, it can sometimes feel a little random about how much money you get from a school.

Re: $$$/Prestige Question
« Reply #2 on: August 20, 2009, 10:51:47 AM »
Yale

Harvard/Stanford

Columbia/NYU/Chicago

Michigan/Virginia/Penn/Boalt

Northwestern/Cornell/Duke/Georgetown

Rest of T1

T2

T3

T4

There are almost certainly exceptions within my groupings, but in general I'd say be willing to go down one level on my diagram for money, but not two. In some cases this is merely hypothetical (Harvard doesn't give merit scholarships), but in general this should serve you well.