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Author Topic: Class Scheduling  (Read 1289 times)

bebocm

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Class Scheduling
« on: August 15, 2009, 11:31:57 AM »
Do you think it's better to participate in something like mock trial/trial competition instead of taking a class that may benefit you when you get a job? I'm in mock trial right now but I really want to take a few crim law classes that will not be offered next semester (my last one). So...will my resume look better with mock trial or with classes that are related to the job I want?

one4theteam

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Re: Class Scheduling
« Reply #1 on: August 18, 2009, 12:55:05 AM »
My two cents, do mock trial.  No one really cares THAT much about what classes you take.  Everyone in law school takes classes. 

Mock trial, not everyone does that.  I think its far more marketable in that sense that 1) you demonstrated initiative just by getting on the team 2) you demonstrate that you have some level of desirable advocacy skills 3) its also practical experience as opposed to classroom time. 


jacy85

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Re: Class Scheduling
« Reply #2 on: August 18, 2009, 07:14:30 AM »
If you can swing it, take crim pro (if your school splits it into crim pro I, II, etc., I'm talking about investigation/constitutional crim pro).  Other crim law classes aren't all that important.  But don't ditch mock trial to do so.

RobWreck

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Re: Class Scheduling
« Reply #3 on: August 18, 2009, 11:23:31 AM »
In general, practical skill-based classes are always more valued than purely academic ones... legal writing & research, drafting courses, mock trial/trial advocacy, appellate advocacy... the things that are closer to the actual practice of law.
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big - fat - box

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Re: Class Scheduling
« Reply #4 on: August 18, 2009, 11:39:15 AM »
IMHO, you be far better off doing some kind of clinic or program where you can represent clients under your jurisidiction's student practice rule than doing mock trial.

What type of crim law classes are we talking about?

tacojohn

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Re: Class Scheduling
« Reply #5 on: August 22, 2009, 12:17:45 PM »
If you can swing it, take crim pro (if your school splits it into crim pro I, II, etc., I'm talking about investigation/constitutional crim pro).  Other crim law classes aren't all that important.  But don't ditch mock trial to do so.

If the choices are just these two, take the Crim Pro classes, especially one that covers Crim Pro investigation (i.e. 4th Amendment). Not only is it useful information, but it's on the Multistate as well and many state bar exams too, plus it's fairly difficult stuff to learn in a few weeks.

EarlCat

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Re: Class Scheduling
« Reply #6 on: August 22, 2009, 02:59:54 PM »
I'd pick mock trial--this makes a bullet point on your resume rather than a line in your transcript.  Many of the firms I signed up to interview with had "Jounal, moot court, or mock trial preferred" in their criteria.  None had "Crim Pro preferred."

jacy85

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Re: Class Scheduling
« Reply #7 on: August 23, 2009, 03:47:48 PM »
I'd pick mock trial--this makes a bullet point on your resume rather than a line in your transcript.  Many of the firms I signed up to interview with had "Jounal, moot court, or mock trial preferred" in their criteria.  None had "Crim Pro preferred."

The problem is the OP indicated that he/she wants a job doing criminal work (didn't specify defense or prosecution).  Mock trial will be extremely helpful, but having a transcript with no crim pro classes may stand out as a large transcript gap for those types of position.