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Author Topic: Call back distinction...?  (Read 3404 times)

SEC_2L

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Call back distinction...?
« on: August 14, 2009, 07:23:50 PM »
When a firm (out of state) calls you and invites you to come interview at their office based on a mail/online app as opposed to a screening interview at OCI, is that still considered a "call back" so as to put you in the same candidate pool as those who were literally called "back" from OCI?

I am heading out to one of these next week and wonder if I will come in on an even playing field with those who were called back from OCI...

hawkpilot

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Re: Call back distinction...?
« Reply #1 on: August 14, 2009, 10:34:10 PM »
Though others may disagree, my say is yes, it is a "callback."  Think of it this way, they are bringing you in to interview with several people, same as a callback from an OCI.  Most say the snail mail method is pointless, so to get an interview that way means your resume must be impressive enough to merit them bringing you in having not met you.

SEC_2L

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Re: Call back distinction...?
« Reply #2 on: August 14, 2009, 11:38:56 PM »
That is pretty much what my assumption was but it seemed like it could go either way. What are some other takes on this? Does this kind of call back give you the same percentage for an offer as an OCI call back?

hooloovoo

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Re: Call back distinction...?
« Reply #3 on: August 18, 2009, 05:01:51 PM »
When a firm (out of state) calls you and invites you to come interview at their office based on a mail/online app as opposed to a screening interview at OCI, is that still considered a "call back" so as to put you in the same candidate pool as those who were literally called "back" from OCI?

I am heading out to one of these next week and wonder if I will come in on an even playing field with those who were called back from OCI...

i would say that it would put you in the same candidate pool.  presumably you'll be going through the same process: talking to a number of different attorneys, etc.

mnewboldc

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Re: Call back distinction...?
« Reply #4 on: September 06, 2009, 10:18:49 PM »
Clarify with the firm first, especially regarding transportation issues. I was faced with a similar situation a year ago at a firm (admittedly one in my home state). Because that firm considered the interview to be a combination of screening + callback, I didn't get reimbursed for my transpo expenses.
Cornell 2011

SEC_2L

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Re: Call back distinction...?
« Reply #5 on: September 06, 2009, 10:55:22 PM »
That wasn't my concern at all given that the firm was only 3.5 hours away. All the markets I am targeting are within 5 hours driving distance so I could care less if a firm will reimburse me or not. I just want them to call...

Clarify with the firm first, especially regarding transportation issues. I was faced with a similar situation a year ago at a firm (admittedly one in my home state). Because that firm considered the interview to be a combination of screening + callback, I didn't get reimbursed for my transpo expenses.


mnewboldc

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Re: Call back distinction...?
« Reply #6 on: September 07, 2009, 03:47:04 PM »
From your statement that the firm was "out of state" I construed that you would be incurring substantial travel expenses. Notwithstanding that such expenses are apparently insubstantial in your case, the substance of your interview will probably be different, whether you classify what you're doing as a "callback" or not. At a callback interview that comes after a screening interview the firm has already determined that you meet their general criteria (i.e., you're a go-getter, you're laid-back, you want to work in a certain area of law, you're committed to staying in the region, you know a lot about the firm, etc.), and the questions when you come in will be more targeted. When you come in without having established such things, the interviewers will be trying to get a read on you. You know they like something about your resume, but you don't know exactly what that thing is. Not only will your interview process be longer (you might meet with five or six attorneys, as opposed to three or four), but it might be the case that each interviewer focuses on a different aspect of your resume. This doesn't seem difficult, but your head can start to spin after the third or fourth interview and you don't want to give inconsistent answers or asking duplicitous questions. Nor do you have much time to build on the knowledge you picked up about the firm at the screening interview. So while you may not be in a worse "place" in the firm's eyes than the folks the firm invited after an OCI, you are at a significant disadvantage insofar as you don't know how to best sell yourself to the firm. So you'd better make friends with someone who went on a callback with that firm. Failing that, do your homework.
Cornell 2011