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Author Topic: Is going to a lower ranked school really that bad?  (Read 9053 times)

nealric

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Re: Is going to a lower ranked school really that bad?
« Reply #20 on: October 18, 2009, 08:13:30 PM »
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I want to get into the highest ranking school I can, but tuition also plays a major factor in what I am capable of affording. I was barely able to finish out my last year of undergrad because I could not get enough financial aid. And I have also thought about working my butt off during my first year and then transferring to a better law school. I know it is a long shot, but it is worth a try. Again, thanks guys!

Don't just go to the highest ranking school you get into unless that school is a top school (top 20 or so). After that, a lot of other factors come into play.

You won't have a problem getting enough financial aid to finish. Trust me, they will throw plenty of loans your way. However, unless you are going to a top school, it's usually a good idea to go somewhere instate or with a good scholarship.

It's possible to transfer, but don't count on it. Law school grades are unpredictable.
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JDat45

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Re: Is going to a lower ranked school really that bad?
« Reply #21 on: November 08, 2009, 10:12:10 PM »
The postings above make good points.  In this economy you need to go to a solid law school or not go at all.  Too many people are ending up $150K in debt and without jobs.  When they do get a job, it's paying them $50K which is less than many were making before going to law school.

For school comparison purposes, check out www.nalpdirectory.com and click on "advanced search".  There is a table you can look into that will provide the list of firms interviewing at each school. Compare schools and factor in the number of students at the schools you're comparing in order to see how difficult the job market is for each schools' students.  Most students will not get a job through OCI, however, looking at the number of firms visiting will show you how "in-demand" students from a particular school are in their region.

Best,

Kris
Modified to remove spam- nealric


Thank you for this info Kris. I did the NALP search and it's quite sobering...  :-\