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Author Topic: IP prosecution a dying breed among big laws?  (Read 2385 times)

gatorade

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IP prosecution a dying breed among big laws?
« on: July 31, 2009, 05:25:06 PM »
because the price margin has shrunk too much?

just heard that today, does anyone have any input on this? thx

Majmun

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Re: IP prosecution a dying breed among big laws?
« Reply #1 on: July 31, 2009, 05:38:09 PM »
Patent prosecution has never been a mainstay of biglaw. Most pros work has always been done by boutiques.

gatorade

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Re: IP prosecution a dying breed among big laws?
« Reply #2 on: July 31, 2009, 06:27:19 PM »
Patent prosecution has never been a mainstay of biglaw. Most pros work has always been done by boutiques.

and i assume boutiqes usually don't want to work with fresh graduates, and of course, doesn't pay big-law money?

Majmun

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Re: IP prosecution a dying breed among big laws?
« Reply #3 on: July 31, 2009, 07:16:16 PM »
Patent prosecution has never been a mainstay of biglaw. Most pros work has always been done by boutiques.

and i assume boutiqes usually don't want to work with fresh graduates, and of course, doesn't pay big-law money?

Most boutiques do hire fresh grads and for the most part they pay market (or near market). Many also hire science advisors/patent agents and pay for them to attend law school at night.  Even IP shops in flyover states start associates at six figures (~115K - 145K). The problem with big law pay and prosecution isn't the 1st year salary as much as it is  the 5 - 8th year salary. A patent can only be drafted so fast, clients will only pay so much, and the billing rates for senior associates are often to high  for them to be able to prosecute efficiently at typical big law billing rates. 


gatorade

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Re: IP prosecution a dying breed among big laws?
« Reply #4 on: July 31, 2009, 08:26:09 PM »
Patent prosecution has never been a mainstay of biglaw. Most pros work has always been done by boutiques.

and i assume boutiqes usually don't want to work with fresh graduates, and of course, doesn't pay big-law money?

Most boutiques do hire fresh grads and for the most part they pay market (or near market). Many also hire science advisors/patent agents and pay for them to attend law school at night.  Even IP shops in flyover states start associates at six figures (~115K - 145K). The problem with big law pay and prosecution isn't the 1st year salary as much as it is  the 5 - 8th year salary. A patent can only be drafted so fast, clients will only pay so much, and the billing rates for senior associates are often to high  for them to be able to prosecute efficiently at typical big law billing rates. 



that sounds pretty good.    yes, big law associate salary increases pretty steady, at current rate, it's about 280k for a 7th year associate i take?    how much does a 7th year associate at a boutique makes?  and do they kick u out after 7/8 years at a boutique?  thx

Majmun

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Re: IP prosecution a dying breed among big laws?
« Reply #5 on: July 31, 2009, 09:02:56 PM »


that sounds pretty good.    yes, big law associate salary increases pretty steady, at current rate, it's about 280k for a 7th year associate i take?    how much does a 7th year associate at a boutique makes?  and do they kick u out after 7/8 years at a boutique?  thx


Depends, some make as much as big law, but often with smaller bonuses. Others pay ~20% less. It is hard to know for certain because it is not uncommon for boutiques to end lockstep compensation after the first few years.

Boutiques often require fewer billables as well. The thing is that beyond the 4th or 5th  year, associates often start doing other work like due diligence, opinion work, litigation etc. They will also do some high level prosecution work (not all prosecution work is created equal). Boutiques aren't usually built on the up or out model that requires massive attrition. I know plenty of senior associates/of counsel (beyond 8th year) that stick around. There is however plenty of attrition, mainly due to the fact that many prosecutors go in house and manage IP portfolios.