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Author Topic: Law School Transfer Book- The Art of the Law School Transfer  (Read 17921 times)

scoop333

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Re: Law School Transfer Book- The Art of the Law School Transfer
« Reply #10 on: February 23, 2010, 01:17:16 PM »
Thanks...appreciate the support!!

coto29

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Re: Law School Transfer Book- The Art of the Law School Transfer
« Reply #11 on: February 24, 2010, 04:01:34 PM »
Quick question.  Did you find any info on Memphis in your research last year?  Its tier 3 so you may not have looked into it, the ABA transfer stats are low:  2 in 1 out.  I'm hoping that such low "in" numbers are because the school didn't have many apps.  Otherwise, they could be hostile to transfers.  Thanks in advance.

scoop333

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Re: Law School Transfer Book- The Art of the Law School Transfer
« Reply #12 on: February 25, 2010, 11:28:43 AM »
Coto,

Unfortunately, when Andrew and I did the research for the numbers chart in the book, we focused in on the top 100 schools.  We contacted each school and informed them about our project and those who participated we included their numbers in the book.  Without doing any research on Memphis, I would suspect they do not receive a lot of transfer applications because they are a T3 school and a majority of transfer students try to jump into the T2 and T1 schools.  Additionally, Memphis might be a strong regional school, thus a low number of students are trying to leave if they do well because they want to stay in the area.  Hope this helps.  Good luck this semester!!

stinger35

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Re: Law School Transfer Book- The Art of the Law School Transfer
« Reply #13 on: March 01, 2010, 05:44:32 PM »
Just found out about and ordered the book today. (Also applied to GULC EA today as well...wish I had the book before hand). Was wondering if in your research you found any information at all about PT students. I am a part time student at a T2 (80's) hoping to move up into the t14. I am top 5% and likely number one in my class and am working in the legal field as well as doing pro bono. I am applying to Chicago because I love the city but more realistically would love to end up at NU, UMich, UVA, Duke, or GULC, Cornell, UCLA, USC, probably in that order.

Any information you guys found out would be great, as I am waiting for the book. I am really just getting worried/paranoid that the whole PT thing will keep me out of the t14.

scoop333

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Re: Law School Transfer Book- The Art of the Law School Transfer
« Reply #14 on: March 02, 2010, 02:04:18 PM »
Congrats on doing so well your first semester!!  As you mentioned, finishing at the top of your class as a PT student is not the same as finishing at the top if you are a full time student; however, it is still quite an accomplishment.  I do not believe you will be counted out when trying to apply to the upper echeclon schools.  Since you have your grades solidified, I would concentrate your efforts on obtaining outstanding LOR's and really developing your Transfer Statement to make you stand out from the rest.  You mentioned you applied to GULC EA, I am pretty sure they allow students the opportunity to jump to the full time program after they have proven themselves in the part time program.  Good luck this semster, and I hope our book will provide you with help.

Seth

CanadianWolf

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Re: Law School Transfer Book- The Art of the Law School Transfer
« Reply #15 on: March 24, 2010, 07:45:15 PM »
The advice shared in the excerpt appears to be common-sense generic suggestions that are presented in an unedited fashion.

CanadianWolf

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Re: Law School Transfer Book- The Art of the Law School Transfer
« Reply #16 on: March 24, 2010, 07:55:16 PM »
@stinger35: If you are currently attending a Chicago area law school such as Loyola or DePaul, then one of your professors may be able to assist with a strong recommendation to a known admissions officer at one of your target schools.
As a part-time transfer from a non-AALS law school to an AALS law school, you may have to consider starting over as a first year law student without advanced standing. This, of course, is not an issue at schools such as Georgetown which are reviewing their own students for transfer from part to full-time.

scoop333

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Re: Law School Transfer Book- The Art of the Law School Transfer
« Reply #17 on: March 28, 2010, 12:37:26 PM »
Thank you for your comments.

coto29

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Re: Law School Transfer Book- The Art of the Law School Transfer
« Reply #18 on: March 28, 2010, 07:22:03 PM »
The advice shared in the excerpt appears to be common-sense generic suggestions that are presented in an unedited fashion.

Ha.  The desire and effort to be honest.  Refreshing.

Thane Messinger

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Re: Law School Transfer Book- The Art of the Law School Transfer
« Reply #19 on: April 01, 2010, 11:37:55 PM »
The advice shared in the excerpt appears to be common-sense generic suggestions that are presented in an unedited fashion.


I try to stay out of these, but . . .

Interestingly, it is the large questions we often get wrong, based on these generic, general factors.  We don't often look back and say "Gee, I wish that teacher in my sixth-period English class had taught me the seventh rule of participles."

As to common sense, that's neither terribly common nor filled with many cents.  One should seek guidance not from similarly situated peers, but rather from those who might just have been there, done that . . . and in so being and doing have something to share.

I remember taking a survey in law school.  I was a 1L, and the survey was the general are-we-doing-a-good-job survey.  I remembered thinking (as a 1L) that my answers were really without any basis.  As a 2L and 3L, I remembered getting angry that my 1L ballot was, in essence, a dilution of more valuable 2L and 3L votes.  There are many good and valuable voices in law school (as anywhere); but be careful not to put too much faith in what everyone seems to think is right.  In law school, that is an almost-certain route to sub-par performance.

No book will offer a magical "A" without effort, just as no book will be The Answer.  But that hardly means we should be happy in our ignorance.  If one picks up just a handful of tips from any resource--here or in life--that's a good bargain.  As it happens I read a manuscript of Art of the Law School Transfer.  It's not War & Peace, but then again, that's hardly what one would expect .  Several deans of admissions added their two cents' worth, and if there's anything that's not "generic," that would surely be it.  But, of course, that's just my two cents' worth.