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Author Topic: low LSAT score  (Read 14090 times)

Matthies

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Re: low LSAT score
« Reply #20 on: July 27, 2009, 08:16:51 AM »
Heres a hint for you  ;) ABA Law schools will let you in with a low 120 LSAT score if they didn't fill up all their seats and they have room. They would rather have your $150,000.00 for that one seat, then let it go empty. You have to keep bothering them even after you get your denial letter, to let them know you're still interested in attending. You always have the right to appeal their decision. Even if the school policy is not to allow anybody in below a 150 LSAT, they don't go by that. They just had to put that there so they don't look desperate.

I have a friend who attended a T3 law school with a low LSAT in the 120's. He also graduated at the top of his class. 

I have another friend who had a 172 LSAT score and tried 4 years in a row to get into a T3 law school in the town he lived in. He wasn't willing to move, so he had to attend that one school because he had a family. The school refused to allow him in.

The bad ones will take a 120ish person to fill a seat. The good ones will go ahead and go without.

Seriously, and what school, even T4's don't have a waiting list, there are simply more wanttobe lawyers than thier are seats in law school, no school has to take a 120 to fill up
*In clinical studies, Matthies was well tolerated, but women who are pregnant, nursing or might become pregnant should not take or handle Matthies due to a rare, but serious side effect called him having to make child support payments.

Denny Shore

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Re: low LSAT score
« Reply #21 on: July 27, 2009, 02:36:05 PM »
Matthies is right.
Every school has a waiting list full of borderline applicants.  As seats become available, they extend admission to those who are closest to their desired profiles.  A 120 is guaranteed not to be closest, no matter which school it is.
The advice given about waiting until seats fill up is a guaranteed fail.  Those who have been providing said advice have no idea what they are talking about and should be ignored.
Anecdotal evidence is garbage - we don't know if the 'friend' who got in with a 120 had strong soft factors, knew the director of admissions, had family connections to the school, or was from a family of uber-rich who wrote the alumni association a huge check or sponsored a new library.  All we know is that the faceless, unaccountable poster claims it happened.
A 120 wont do it.  Retake after doing some review.
There are currently too many applicants to too few schools, leaving thousands of potential law students out of a career.  If you like anecdotal evidence, I have a close friend who showed me his numbers and asked me to help edit his personal statement.  His LSAT score was 155 and his GPA was 3.00.  His personal statement was strong and he had 6 years of proffessional sales experience at a Fortune 500 company.  He applied to every school in Chicago that he thought he might have a shot at: JMLS, Kent, DePaul, Loyola, and NIU.  His application was denied at every school.  The point is: you never can tell.  All you can do is do your best to send the best possible application package.  As a side note, my friend was discouraged by the rejections and changed paths - now he is a director of business development at a very profitable technology company.
Don't listen to the dunder heads who think a 120 will get you into law school when they have seats open.  Few law schools run into this problem at all, and most simply let the seats go empty if they can't fill them with wait listed students.  A 120 will not get you on a waitlist.
Why?
Simple: the lowest score you can receive on any given LSAT is 120.  Fill out your name and refuse to answer any other questions?  You'd likely get a 120.  Why?  Because that's the scale used on the LSAT.  All scores are normalized on a scoring scale of 120-180.  You can't get better than a 180 and you can't score lower than a 120.
The median score on the LSAT is currently hovering around 151.  If you want to get wait listed or enrolled somewhere, that should be your target score.
Additionally, you should know that scoring a 120 means you have an uphill battle to face and should be thinking about whether or not you think you can increase your score enough as well as how you intend on explaining getting the 120.  Both will be reported to the law school and they will want to know why you got the score, then retook the test and scored so well.  My decent, but not particularly impressive score was explained as being a raw score that came about as a result of no preparation - I used my LSAT to determine if Law School was for me or if I should go in a different direction.  That's not to say that a good prep class can't help (or be the explanation of the score discrepancies).

Ninja1

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Re: low LSAT score
« Reply #22 on: July 27, 2009, 06:19:57 PM »
Heres a hint for you  ;) ABA Law schools will let you in with a low 120 LSAT score if they didn't fill up all their seats and they have room. They would rather have your $150,000.00 for that one seat, then let it go empty. You have to keep bothering them even after you get your denial letter, to let them know you're still interested in attending. You always have the right to appeal their decision. Even if the school policy is not to allow anybody in below a 150 LSAT, they don't go by that. They just had to put that there so they don't look desperate.

I have a friend who attended a T3 law school with a low LSAT in the 120's. He also graduated at the top of his class. 

I have another friend who had a 172 LSAT score and tried 4 years in a row to get into a T3 law school in the town he lived in. He wasn't willing to move, so he had to attend that one school because he had a family. The school refused to allow him in.

The bad ones will take a 120ish person to fill a seat. The good ones will go ahead and go without.

Seriously, and what school, even T4's don't have a waiting list, there are simply more wanttobe lawyers than thier are seats in law school, no school has to take a 120 to fill up

Though, as an aside, I do recall looking at a Denver info sheet from LSAC a few years ago that said Denver had one admit with like a 125-129 and a 2.25-2.5 or something. I can try to dig it up if you want.

I figured they must have given that person a full ride, since it would probably be a crime to admit someone with those numbers and still make them pay for it.
I'mma stay bumpin' till I bump my head on my tomb.

Matthies

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Re: low LSAT score
« Reply #23 on: July 27, 2009, 06:29:00 PM »
Heres a hint for you  ;) ABA Law schools will let you in with a low 120 LSAT score if they didn't fill up all their seats and they have room. They would rather have your $150,000.00 for that one seat, then let it go empty. You have to keep bothering them even after you get your denial letter, to let them know you're still interested in attending. You always have the right to appeal their decision. Even if the school policy is not to allow anybody in below a 150 LSAT, they don't go by that. They just had to put that there so they don't look desperate.

I have a friend who attended a T3 law school with a low LSAT in the 120's. He also graduated at the top of his class. 

I have another friend who had a 172 LSAT score and tried 4 years in a row to get into a T3 law school in the town he lived in. He wasn't willing to move, so he had to attend that one school because he had a family. The school refused to allow him in.

The bad ones will take a 120ish person to fill a seat. The good ones will go ahead and go without.

Seriously, and what school, even T4's don't have a waiting list, there are simply more wanttobe lawyers than thier are seats in law school, no school has to take a 120 to fill up

Though, as an aside, I do recall looking at a Denver info sheet from LSAC a few years ago that said Denver had one admit with like a 125-129 and a 2.25-2.5 or something. I can try to dig it up if you want.

I figured they must have given that person a full ride, since it would probably be a crime to admit someone with those numbers and still make them pay for it.

They probably donated money to the school, there is a classmate who will remani nnameless but whose family name is like on three buildings around campus, he probably did not even need to take the LSAT
*In clinical studies, Matthies was well tolerated, but women who are pregnant, nursing or might become pregnant should not take or handle Matthies due to a rare, but serious side effect called him having to make child support payments.

Ninja1

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Re: low LSAT score
« Reply #24 on: July 27, 2009, 06:39:14 PM »
Heres a hint for you  ;) ABA Law schools will let you in with a low 120 LSAT score if they didn't fill up all their seats and they have room. They would rather have your $150,000.00 for that one seat, then let it go empty. You have to keep bothering them even after you get your denial letter, to let them know you're still interested in attending. You always have the right to appeal their decision. Even if the school policy is not to allow anybody in below a 150 LSAT, they don't go by that. They just had to put that there so they don't look desperate.

I have a friend who attended a T3 law school with a low LSAT in the 120's. He also graduated at the top of his class. 

I have another friend who had a 172 LSAT score and tried 4 years in a row to get into a T3 law school in the town he lived in. He wasn't willing to move, so he had to attend that one school because he had a family. The school refused to allow him in.

The bad ones will take a 120ish person to fill a seat. The good ones will go ahead and go without.

Seriously, and what school, even T4's don't have a waiting list, there are simply more wanttobe lawyers than thier are seats in law school, no school has to take a 120 to fill up

Though, as an aside, I do recall looking at a Denver info sheet from LSAC a few years ago that said Denver had one admit with like a 125-129 and a 2.25-2.5 or something. I can try to dig it up if you want.

I figured they must have given that person a full ride, since it would probably be a crime to admit someone with those numbers and still make them pay for it.

They probably donated money to the school, there is a classmate who will remani nnameless but whose family name is like on three buildings around campus, he probably did not even need to take the LSAT

That would explain it.

Them nice new lawyering buildings don't pay for themselves. :)
I'mma stay bumpin' till I bump my head on my tomb.

Matthies

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Re: low LSAT score
« Reply #25 on: July 27, 2009, 06:43:53 PM »
Heres a hint for you  ;) ABA Law schools will let you in with a low 120 LSAT score if they didn't fill up all their seats and they have room. They would rather have your $150,000.00 for that one seat, then let it go empty. You have to keep bothering them even after you get your denial letter, to let them know you're still interested in attending. You always have the right to appeal their decision. Even if the school policy is not to allow anybody in below a 150 LSAT, they don't go by that. They just had to put that there so they don't look desperate.

I have a friend who attended a T3 law school with a low LSAT in the 120's. He also graduated at the top of his class. 

I have another friend who had a 172 LSAT score and tried 4 years in a row to get into a T3 law school in the town he lived in. He wasn't willing to move, so he had to attend that one school because he had a family. The school refused to allow him in.

The bad ones will take a 120ish person to fill a seat. The good ones will go ahead and go without.

Seriously, and what school, even T4's don't have a waiting list, there are simply more wanttobe lawyers than thier are seats in law school, no school has to take a 120 to fill up

Though, as an aside, I do recall looking at a Denver info sheet from LSAC a few years ago that said Denver had one admit with like a 125-129 and a 2.25-2.5 or something. I can try to dig it up if you want.

I figured they must have given that person a full ride, since it would probably be a crime to admit someone with those numbers and still make them pay for it.

They probably donated money to the school, there is a classmate who will remani nnameless but whose family name is like on three buildings around campus, he probably did not even need to take the LSAT

That would explain it.

Them nice new lawyering buildings don't pay for themselves. :)

65 million is what they spent on that law school, then three years later a 20 million dollor gift and bam it was called the "Strum Colege of Law"
*In clinical studies, Matthies was well tolerated, but women who are pregnant, nursing or might become pregnant should not take or handle Matthies due to a rare, but serious side effect called him having to make child support payments.

Sheryl11

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Re: low LSAT score
« Reply #26 on: August 22, 2009, 10:58:20 AM »
There is nothing else you can do. Get the LSAT up. After that make sure your app materials are flawless. There is a good book on law school personal statements and such by Anna Ivey. Your local library might have it or you can buy a used copy off Amazon marketplace. But don't worry about that right now, just focus on the LSAT. There is an LSAT section on this site that will give you all kinds of advice on studying.

http://www.lawschooldiscussion.org/prelaw/index.php/board,6.0.html

Thank you for recommending the book by Anna Ivey. It's very helpful.