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Author Topic: Jr. BigLaw Associate in NY Taking Questions  (Read 23674 times)

T. Durden

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Re: Jr. BigLaw Associate in NY Taking Questions
« Reply #20 on: July 07, 2009, 07:49:02 PM »
This guy had like 20 years of work experience by himself, and there he was right next to the rest of us, reviewing documents.

Not to divulge too much detail, but I currently have a guy with 20+ yrs WE who used to be GC for one of the nation's major corporations on the K attny staff. In a fair and just world, I'd be getting this guy his coffee in the AM; instead, he asks me for permission to take lunch at 12:50 as opposed to 1. I can't help but wonder what I have gotten myself into.

T. Durden

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Re: Jr. BigLaw Associate in NY Taking Questions
« Reply #21 on: July 07, 2009, 07:51:04 PM »
To echo the post above, do all major markets have as much doc review?  I'm planning on using all of my bids on LA and maybe a few on secondary markets.  The good news is that most firms in LA seem to have large employment/labor groups so I imagine I could always request to be there if I want to avoid it.

This is going to depend on what is considered the ďpractice of lawĒ in each jurisdiction. As I mentioned in the other thread NYís law is pretty explicate and says doc review HAS TO BE DONE BY A LAWYER. Hence you have tons of contract lawyers in a state like NY. Not every state has that same rule, so in some states doc review can be done by paralegals or just about anyone in some cases. Thatís how it is in Colorado. You donít need to be a lawyer so I never actually met a contract lawyer and as far as I know we donít even have companies that set up such services here (like in NYC). So you need to check what the practice requirements are in the jurisdiction you want to work in to find out if there is a lot of contract lawyer/doc review work going on there or itís not something they normally have lawyers do.

All that being said, reviewing documents IS WHAT LAWYERS DO. Yes there is a difference between the lawyerly doc review and just clicking yes/no a screen in some firmís basement. But if you donít want to review ďdocumentsĒ be they contracts, wills, merger agreements, statutes or regulations, or something else law may not be what you expect. Most lawyers spend the vast majority of the time reviewing stuff and writing about what they have reviewed and very little in an actual courtroom.

haha and M Cool this is where you call out the 4 yr grad from the Uni of Denver who is currently prepping for the CO bar so that he can start his stay-at-home environmental interest job for lecturing you on what it means to be a lawyer

Matthies

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Re: Jr. BigLaw Associate in NY Taking Questions
« Reply #22 on: July 07, 2009, 07:56:59 PM »
To echo the post above, do all major markets have as much doc review?  I'm planning on using all of my bids on LA and maybe a few on secondary markets.  The good news is that most firms in LA seem to have large employment/labor groups so I imagine I could always request to be there if I want to avoid it.

This is going to depend on what is considered the ďpractice of lawĒ in each jurisdiction. As I mentioned in the other thread NYís law is pretty explicate and says doc review HAS TO BE DONE BY A LAWYER. Hence you have tons of contract lawyers in a state like NY. Not every state has that same rule, so in some states doc review can be done by paralegals or just about anyone in some cases. Thatís how it is in Colorado. You donít need to be a lawyer so I never actually met a contract lawyer and as far as I know we donít even have companies that set up such services here (like in NYC). So you need to check what the practice requirements are in the jurisdiction you want to work in to find out if there is a lot of contract lawyer/doc review work going on there or itís not something they normally have lawyers do.

All that being said, reviewing documents IS WHAT LAWYERS DO. Yes there is a difference between the lawyerly doc review and just clicking yes/no a screen in some firmís basement. But if you donít want to review ďdocumentsĒ be they contracts, wills, merger agreements, statutes or regulations, or something else law may not be what you expect. Most lawyers spend the vast majority of the time reviewing stuff and writing about what they have reviewed and very little in an actual courtroom.

haha and M Cool this is where you call out the 4 yr grad from the Uni of Denver who is currently prepping for the CO bar so that he can start his stay-at-home environmental interest job for lecturing you on what it means to be a lawyer

Well I have been pretending to be a law clerk for the last four years doing lawyer stuff in a law firm place where some real lawyers work so maybe I picked up something on the side once in a ahwile about what you guys actually do
*In clinical studies, Matthies was well tolerated, but women who are pregnant, nursing or might become pregnant should not take or handle Matthies due to a rare, but serious side effect called him having to make child support payments.

Burning Sands, Esq.

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Re: Jr. BigLaw Associate in NY Taking Questions
« Reply #23 on: July 07, 2009, 09:18:45 PM »
This guy had like 20 years of work experience by himself, and there he was right next to the rest of us, reviewing documents.

Not to divulge too much detail, but I currently have a guy with 20+ yrs WE who used to be GC for one of the nation's major corporations on the K attny staff. In a fair and just world, I'd be getting this guy his coffee in the AM; instead, he asks me for permission to take lunch at 12:50 as opposed to 1. I can't help but wonder what I have gotten myself into.

It's bananas out there, man.  Straight bananas.
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rolen27

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Re: Jr. BigLaw Associate in NY Taking Questions
« Reply #24 on: July 08, 2009, 08:09:42 AM »
I have a quick question, do you know anything about markets outside of NYC? ie how is the work and QOL different in other cities such as Chicago, DC, Boston, in the South (Dallas or Atlanta), and in the West (LA, SF)?

Burning Sands, Esq.

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Re: Jr. BigLaw Associate in NY Taking Questions
« Reply #25 on: July 08, 2009, 09:54:19 AM »
I have a quick question, do you know anything about markets outside of NYC? ie how is the work and QOL different in other cities such as Chicago, DC, Boston, in the South (Dallas or Atlanta), and in the West (LA, SF)?

California firms tend to have a rep as more "lifestyle" type firms.

DC, from what I hear, is not half bad.  A lot of political law practice groups are developing into biglaw as they adopt or acquire the DC lobbying firms.

Outside of NY, DC, NJ, and CA I'm not too familiar with the other markets personally but can ask around.
"A lawyer's either a social engineer or a parasite on society. A social engineer is a highly skilled...lawyer who understands the Constitution of the U.S. and knows how to explore its uses in the solving of problems of local communities and in bettering [our] conditions."
Charles H. Houston

Matthies

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Re: Jr. BigLaw Associate in NY Taking Questions
« Reply #26 on: July 08, 2009, 10:29:17 AM »
My question is WHY DO YOU GUYS PUT UP WITH IT? Iíve never been to NYC maybe I would understand if I had. But why do you guys stay with the uncertainty of the legal profession, the layoffs, the crappy hours, the high cost of living, the taxes, the astronomical rents, being target city number one for every terrorist out there, the traffic, not being able to own a car, I guess I just donít see the attraction vs. the hassels. What is it that makes so many lawyers want to live and work there? Granted we donít pay $160 to start, but market is $120 and that will buy you a lot in cities like Denver or Phoenix or Houston.
*In clinical studies, Matthies was well tolerated, but women who are pregnant, nursing or might become pregnant should not take or handle Matthies due to a rare, but serious side effect called him having to make child support payments.

botbot

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Re: Jr. BigLaw Associate in NY Taking Questions
« Reply #27 on: July 08, 2009, 10:41:34 AM »
My question is WHY DO YOU GUYS PUT UP WITH IT? Iíve never been to NYC maybe I would understand if I had. But why do you guys stay with the uncertainty of the legal profession, the layoffs, the crappy hours, the high cost of living, the taxes, the astronomical rents, being target city number one for every terrorist out there, the traffic, not being able to own a car, I guess I just donít see the attraction vs. the hassels. What is it that makes so many lawyers want to live and work there? Granted we donít pay $160 to start, but market is $120 and that will buy you a lot in cities like Denver or Phoenix or Houston.

The majority of Houston biglaw either 145 or 160.

Matthies

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Re: Jr. BigLaw Associate in NY Taking Questions
« Reply #28 on: July 08, 2009, 11:01:23 AM »
My question is WHY DO YOU GUYS PUT UP WITH IT? Iíve never been to NYC maybe I would understand if I had. But why do you guys stay with the uncertainty of the legal profession, the layoffs, the crappy hours, the high cost of living, the taxes, the astronomical rents, being target city number one for every terrorist out there, the traffic, not being able to own a car, I guess I just donít see the attraction vs. the hassels. What is it that makes so many lawyers want to live and work there? Granted we donít pay $160 to start, but market is $120 and that will buy you a lot in cities like Denver or Phoenix or Houston.

The majority of Houston biglaw either 145 or 160.

Nice, we are lagging behind then
*In clinical studies, Matthies was well tolerated, but women who are pregnant, nursing or might become pregnant should not take or handle Matthies due to a rare, but serious side effect called him having to make child support payments.

,.,.,.;.,.,.

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Re: Jr. BigLaw Associate in NY Taking Questions
« Reply #29 on: July 08, 2009, 11:10:11 AM »
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