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Author Topic: Between a rock and a hard place: Where should I apply?  (Read 831 times)

txlaw2010

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Between a rock and a hard place: Where should I apply?
« on: June 26, 2009, 02:26:51 AM »
I just received my score from my first LSAT this evening, and I'm not particularly thrilled.

I ended up with a 149--I did not take any prep class, and I had very little time to study since I carelessly scheduled my administration for the week following my final exams.  :-[

A little background info: I attend a top university for undergrad, and I'm currently a senior. I have a 2.62 GPA according to the LSDAS.
I know, don't laugh.  ::)

I straightened out my priorities and did a little maturing over the past two semesters, and ended up with a 3.4 average my junior year.

I'm sitting on the 149 kicking myself--I know I could have done better.

My question is: If you were in my situation, where would you apply with a 149, and a 2.62?

I know I should stick with t3/4 schools.. I've read up on Cooley and their practices, and I realize that it may not be the best choice, but I could at least get the 25%
scholarship there.


The bottom line is I want to practice law. I know I should retake the LSAT, but hypothetically, what schools would you recommend I look into?
Thanks guys.  :)




vap

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Re: Between a rock and a hard place: Where should I apply?
« Reply #1 on: June 26, 2009, 02:51:31 AM »
Tough call.  Probably not that many ABA accredited schools that will accept you and be worth the full tuition.

Do you want to work in Texas (judging from your screen name)?  What type of work do you want to do?

txlaw2010

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Re: Between a rock and a hard place: Where should I apply?
« Reply #2 on: June 26, 2009, 02:58:59 AM »
I'm not dead set on Texas. I've been looking into Appalachian, Barry, South TX College of Law, and maybe Pace as a long reach.

As of now I'm still exploring possibilities, just hoping for some recommendations. :)

M_Cool

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Re: Between a rock and a hard place: Where should I apply?
« Reply #3 on: June 26, 2009, 03:04:18 AM »
jesus

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Re: Between a rock and a hard place: Where should I apply?
« Reply #4 on: June 26, 2009, 07:00:48 AM »
Definitely retake the LSAT, and study for it this time.  Also, you might consider adding a double major or whatever in order to justify spending another year in undergrad so you can repair your GPA somewhat. 

EdinTally

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Re: Between a rock and a hard place: Where should I apply?
« Reply #5 on: June 26, 2009, 12:28:40 PM »
You gotta retake.  Period. 

Take the Sept./Oct. and the December test.  Don't make the mistake of thinking that your 149 score is in any way a finite indication of your abilities; keep studying.  Get the powerscore books (I did two different prep classes with no result, your mileage may vary).

At the very least, don't settle for a school that isn't a member of AALS (Cooley is not).

gl

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Re: Between a rock and a hard place: Where should I apply?
« Reply #6 on: June 26, 2009, 12:52:47 PM »
I'd shell out the money for an LSAT prep course if you really, truly want to be a lawyer (not just want to go to law school).  And study like heck for it.  I gave up three months of my life and blew a bucket of money on Testmasters; my score jumped 14 points and I now go to a T20.  Law school is a commitment and the LSAT is no different.  The good news is that now, as opposed to a few years ago, most schools will take the higher score.  You used to have to average them.

I would also work for year or so to try to gain some experience that may help draw some attention away from the GPA.  Good luck!

Number81

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Re: Between a rock and a hard place: Where should I apply?
« Reply #7 on: June 26, 2009, 03:52:32 PM »
My vote is for looking at other careers.  I am at a T20 with almost a full ride and it's barely worth going, economically.
Emory 2L
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metafizik

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Re: Between a rock and a hard place: Where should I apply?
« Reply #8 on: June 26, 2009, 04:28:57 PM »
Look kid, your by no means screwed.  I just finished my senior at TAMU and was in situation similar to yours last summer, but different, let me explain.  Last summer I had not taken the LSAT, in fact the only LSAT i took was in Dec.  I studied approximately two weeks.  My gpa from A&M is a mere 2.4.  I struggled to get my transcripts and my LOR in to the LSAC.  I applied to schools relatively late (it was April) and i found out in May that there was a problem with my Blinn transcript (which really irked me considering i have all of 3 hours at that school.)  blah blah blah long story short, I was a procrastinator with a terrible gpa (to the law schools) and now im looking forward to starting LS in august.  

to study for the lsat you need to get the book published by the lsac.  use this link to see what it looks like

http://search.barnesandnoble.com/The-Official-LSAT-SuperPrep/Law-School-Admission-Council/e/9780979305061/?itm=25

 its a great resource.  You should look over this book and then purchase the kaplan LSAT 180 book seen here:

http://search.barnesandnoble.com/Kaplan-LSAT-180-2008-Edition/Kaplan/e/9781419551802/?itm=35

they might have a 2009 edition but the 2008 should not be much different.  the lsac book definitely needs to be read first (also come with 3 full past exams) because it teaches you the range and format of questions the test will ask.  Next the LSAT 180 book asks you the most difficult of questions in a variety of topics.  it gives you pointers along the way to teach you the thought processes that help you get the answer quickest.  I used the books and got a 161 which put me in the 84th percentile for dec. 08.

if you take advise i wish i had followed, ask two professors when you get back to school in august to write your LOR's.  People in our situation, (bad gpa's) need to have stand out recommendation letters and personal statements.  i hope you have a legit story regarding your academic turnaround.  my personal statement reflected my apathy to my grades (semesters of 1.9, .9, 2.0, and 1.1 for my first 2 years) and why i did not care.  then carried into why i am interested in law and why my grades have been a little better recently because i care again.  
please believe how important the personal statement is... handwritten on my acceptance letter from univ of louisville (T1)is the following:
dear            ,
"The story you told in your personal statement of commitment and motivation lost and then regained is not unprecedented- and when someone recovers their drive as you did, it usually results in continued success.  We were certainly impressed with how you found it within you to turn things around, and hope you decide to continue that pattern with us here in Louisville."
signed by the chair of admissions committee

if i were you i would get a new transcript from your school to LSAC to reflect you recent improvement (if you havent already) as well as transcripts from any jr colleges you may have picked up a couple hours from.  getting your t-scripts and letters of recommendation in early will save you alot of stress later.  Pick out the sept lsat and retake it (no excuses, mine was a sat. in the middle of finals) with gpa's like ours, our score has to stand out.  if you get your applications in early, it should work in your favor (i wish i would have done it)  

when your looking for schools to apply to, use the lsac resources and look for schools that admit atleast 50% of the people in your lsat/gpa range (find this by clicking "Law School Description" button on any School Page)  apply to a good half dozen or eight that you feel like you have a good chance at.  dont be afraid to apply to a few long shot schools that you really want to attend. i'd have never gotten into Louisville had i not done this.  i got into more schools, so look into-
Creighton, univ of Washburn, univ of North Dakota.  I applied to these as fall-back schools thinking i had a good chance to get into them but was glad i took a couple of chances (louisville, univ of arkansas, gonzaga.)