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Author Topic: Can GULC Revoke EA Accpetance?  (Read 1186 times)

Browser

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Can GULC Revoke EA Accpetance?
« on: June 16, 2009, 02:27:46 PM »
For a T50 applicant who was top 3% and accepted to GULC EA, is that person okay if she ends up top 15% for the year? 

What kind of drop would compel GULC to revoke an EA acceptance?

transferguy

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Re: Can GULC Revoke EA Accpetance?
« Reply #1 on: June 16, 2009, 03:46:35 PM »
Even if GULC does actually revoke EA acceptances (which I don't think they do), they certainly wouldn't revoke if you're still top 15%.

Johnster

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Re: Can GULC Revoke EA Accpetance?
« Reply #2 on: June 16, 2009, 03:55:42 PM »
They can revoke but I've never actually heard of them doing so.  They aren't going to revoke if you are in the top 15%... that is still borderline for getting in.  I think the only time they'd revoke is if you failed a class or something.

Browser

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Re: Can GULC Revoke EA Accpetance?
« Reply #3 on: June 16, 2009, 04:06:58 PM »
OK, thanks.  Just paranoid and angry I dropped that much. 

Dr. Balsenschaft

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Re: Can GULC Revoke EA Accpetance?
« Reply #4 on: June 16, 2009, 04:15:14 PM »
OK, thanks.  Just paranoid and angry I dropped that much. 

Although I can understand how you feel with OCI on the horizon and possibly dashed hopes at transferring even further up the food chain, you should at least be psyched you made the right decision to go the EA route. 

lawtransfer22

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Re: Can GULC Revoke EA Accpetance?
« Reply #5 on: June 16, 2009, 08:38:45 PM »
GULC's ea acceptance is not conditional, as long as you do not fail any classes you are in.

GULCHope

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Re: Can GULC Revoke EA Accpetance?
« Reply #6 on: June 16, 2009, 11:22:16 PM »
I'm sure you're good on top 15%, and congrats...and mellow a bit, you don't want to die of a heart attack at 35.

That said...Suppose, in reliance of GULC's promise, you didn't work quite as hard as you could have (let's say you took a 20 hour internship and it caused you to get straight b-). If they revoked, do you think you could win breach of contract damages, arguing that you effectively had a contract, and that your starting salary would have been higher (assuming not overly speculative?) In the alternative, could argue that, by reasonably relying on the transfer (and that the grades wouldn't count), even if you didn't have a contract, GULC's revocation effectively destroyed the value of the courses you took (given that they impact whether you are employable), and you could go after reliance damages under a promissory estoppel claim and try to get your tuition back for last semester?

Just crazy thoughts...

Johnster

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Re: Can GULC Revoke EA Accpetance?
« Reply #7 on: June 16, 2009, 11:36:48 PM »
Promissory estoppel is a last ditch claim (that isn't even fully recognized in some states) that rarely works.  However, most law students, after taking Contracts, think it applies to nearly everything.  I guess this is what happens when professors teach the law by giving issue spotting exams where you find every little argument and throw it into your exam rather than meaningfully evaluating the merits of a claim.  Someone should do a scholarly article on this.

GULCHope

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Re: Can GULC Revoke EA Accpetance?
« Reply #8 on: June 17, 2009, 09:32:01 AM »
Johnster:

Don't get me wrong, I don't think a student would have a strong argument, just a fun question. It would be difficult to establish that the lower performance was A: actually in reliance on the offer, or B: reasonable. Plus there is the issue of proving damages, as most would be highly speculative.

But I do wonder how often students are induced to withdraw applications/acceptances at other programs, only to have their acceptance revoked (whether in the law school context or other academia). I mean, you could probably wouldn't need to think too hard to craft a hypo (a realistic one) where that might happen. I suppose I could tool around on westlaw and answer the question, but how much fun would that be?