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Author Topic: Advice Welcome  (Read 847 times)

Maverick_Law

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Advice Welcome
« on: June 16, 2009, 12:58:06 PM »
I am a 38 year old working Mother.  I returned to school this year to complete undergrad and am hoping to get my JD.  I have read some of the posts on this forum and hope some of you will have some advise on the following:

1.  Not looking for a top tier school (I'm too old for that) what has anyone heard about accredited online JD programs?  I have children (and grandchildren) and a full time rather demanding job so any online course work I cna do is preferable.  My husband is very supportive but we can't financially afford for me to NOT work.

2.  Is interning a viable option for getting your degree sooner?

I'm already studying for LSATs and will do numerous practice tests so I'm not too concerned about that.  Just trying to figure out some possible options so that I can practice before I'm 100. ha ha ha

redcement

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Re: Advice Welcome
« Reply #1 on: June 18, 2009, 04:29:35 PM »
My two cents:

Just because it's accredited does not mean it is ABA approved. From what I've read, without that ABA approval, you cannot practice, even with a JD. I do not know of an ABA approved online school, but you can see for yourself online at LSAC.

You get living expenses paid by loans while in law school. You'll even get your cost of attendance changed to reflect dependant care costs. If you really really can't quit your job opt for a four year program.

Good luck to you!


new2law

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Re: Advice Welcome
« Reply #2 on: June 18, 2009, 05:39:37 PM »
It depends on your state. In california(or if you plan to move to california after graduation) you can take online courses if state approved. Concord and Taft are both accredited and approved, but not much good out of that state.

Apprentiships in CA work if you can find a lawyer in good standing with 5 or more years in that state to work under for a few years and then take the bar yourself. Other states require at least a years law school before applying for it. CA is the exception but unless you already know a lawyer there willing to sponsor you I'd say dont get your hopes too high on finding one.

If you want to go part time Cooley in Michigan has 5 year plans and weekend only scheduling too. They also only require an associates degree to start(same for Taft online) http://www.cooley.edu you can apply online for free and they are ABA approved.


This forum has a "distanec learning law school" section if you want to read some of the posts there too. Just dont fall for Novus, they claim to be a school but arent accredited and cant let you sit the bar anywhere. They'll try to lie to you, dont fall for it.

Maverick_Law

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Re: Advice Welcome
« Reply #3 on: June 19, 2009, 09:35:33 AM »
My two cents:

Just because it's accredited does not mean it is ABA approved. From what I've read, without that ABA approval, you cannot practice, even with a JD. I do not know of an ABA approved online school, but you can see for yourself online at LSAC.

You get living expenses paid by loans while in law school. You'll even get your cost of attendance changed to reflect dependant care costs. If you really really can't quit your job opt for a four year program.

Good luck to you!

Thanks... this is exactly the kind of information I need!

Maverick_Law

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Re: Advice Welcome
« Reply #4 on: June 19, 2009, 09:44:38 AM »
It depends on your state. In california(or if you plan to move to california after graduation) you can take online courses if state approved. Concord and Taft are both accredited and approved, but not much good out of that state.

Apprentiships in CA work if you can find a lawyer in good standing with 5 or more years in that state to work under for a few years and then take the bar yourself. Other states require at least a years law school before applying for it. CA is the exception but unless you already know a lawyer there willing to sponsor you I'd say dont get your hopes too high on finding one.

If you want to go part time Cooley in Michigan has 5 year plans and weekend only scheduling too. They also only require an associates degree to start(same for Taft online) http://www.cooley.edu you can apply online for free and they are ABA approved.

This forum has a "distanec learning law school" section if you want to read some of the posts there too. Just dont fall for Novus, they claim to be a school but arent accredited and cant let you sit the bar anywhere. They'll try to lie to you, dont fall for it.

Good to know, I will have to check all of this out for my state.  I am in Texas and don't plan on moving.  I am currently in a very rural area and am working to put together a foundation that gives assistance to at risk families and victims of domestic abuse for whom legal services are usually out of their reach financially.  We will also be working closely with the county courts to assist first time Juvenile offenders to help hopefully stop them from becoming repeat offenders.  It's a large undertaking and of course circles back to my goal of getting my JD.