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Author Topic: Typing skills?  (Read 928 times)

Kels

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Typing skills?
« on: May 29, 2009, 07:31:58 PM »
If it is required that you type your tests in law school, I am guessing that it is of the up-most importance to be a skilled typer before going to school. Is this correct?

But then again, even if you don't have to type your tests, a person writing by hand is not going to be able to keep up with a skilled typer. And from what I hear speed is everything on law school tests, because of the crazy time constraints.

So if I really suck at typing (i.e. I just peck with my pointers), should I learn how to type ASAP?

NYCFed

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Re: Typing skills?
« Reply #1 on: May 29, 2009, 07:53:28 PM »
You probably should, if not for law school then for your career.  If you're seen typing like that by a potential employer as a summer associate or by a client while practicing it probably won't build confidence in your skills.  There are a few free typing tutor apps and webpages you can try.  But I haven't used any commercial software like Mavis Beacon in well over a decade.

And FYI, the word is "utmost."

Kels

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Re: Typing skills?
« Reply #2 on: May 29, 2009, 08:02:34 PM »
You probably should, if not for law school then for your career.  If you're seen typing like that by a potential employer as a summer associate or by a client while practicing it probably won't build confidence in your skills.  There are a few free typing tutor apps and webpages you can try.  But I haven't used any commercial software like Mavis Beacon in well over a decade.

And FYI, the word is "utmost."

ha ha thanks

TruOne

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Re: Typing skills?
« Reply #3 on: May 29, 2009, 08:59:58 PM »
It doesn't really matter. A lot of students in my class hand-wrote their exams simply b/c they had hand-wrote their notes all year long and didn't want to break the rhythm.

I would've hand-wrote my exams except I've become so addicted to typing that my hand starts cramping if I write too fast for too long.

A potential client or Partner would not care HOW you type a brief or memo. All the care is that it is ACCURATE and TURNED IN ON TIME

Do you know how many Lawyers can't tell you the difference between the Shift button and the Caps-lock key on a keyboard? Typed law school exams is only a recent phenomena. Ask any Lawyer/Professor that graduated 6-10 years ago, they'll tell you that "typing" your exam was only for the select few that actually brought laptops to school.
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NYCFed

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Re: Typing skills?
« Reply #4 on: May 30, 2009, 02:23:16 PM »
It doesn't really matter. A lot of students in my class hand-wrote their exams simply b/c they had hand-wrote their notes all year long and didn't want to break the rhythm.

I would've hand-wrote my exams except I've become so addicted to typing that my hand starts cramping if I write too fast for too long.

A potential client or Partner would not care HOW you type a brief or memo. All the care is that it is ACCURATE and TURNED IN ON TIME

Do you know how many Lawyers can't tell you the difference between the Shift button and the Caps-lock key on a keyboard? Typed law school exams is only a recent phenomena. Ask any Lawyer/Professor that graduated 6-10 years ago, they'll tell you that "typing" your exam was only for the select few that actually brought laptops to school.

Your emphasis suggests you think I was implying a non traditional typist would be unemployable, where I only meant to suggest that the benefits of learning to type well would extend beyond law school.  I should have been clearer in demonstrating that there are other benefits in terms of saved time.

Firms had computers long before students carrying laptops became a norm, and before that they had typewriters and word processors.  You will probably do a lot of typing so a few minutes a day working on typing now can save you hours later.


Ninja1

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Re: Typing skills?
« Reply #5 on: May 31, 2009, 06:49:57 AM »
Generally, I think even slow typers are able to finish their tests without a problem, so typing speed probably won't be a deal breaker on most tests. However, some tests, like my torts exam and its absurd amount of issues, basically turn into typing contests where you can almost rank everyone's grades by their typing speeds.

Where I think typing speed matters most is in note taking. I type pretty fast and still sometimes miss stuff. Even if you take really concise notes, the parts worth writing usually come in chunks that are easy to miss parts of. And then you have the occasional professor that basically wants you to write everything they said over the course of the semester on the test, which means you'll be wanting to literally write down almost everything they say.
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