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Author Topic: Kaplan prep-is it really needed?  (Read 858 times)

basicgrey7

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Kaplan prep-is it really needed?
« on: May 21, 2009, 12:00:10 AM »
I have purchased the Princeton Review, and the LSAT Super Prep, and The Next 10 Actual Tests. Do I really need to go to a Kaplan program? I am very good at self teaching, would spending 1000+ be worth it?

KaplanLSATInstructor

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Re: Kaplan prep-is it really needed?
« Reply #1 on: May 21, 2009, 12:00:09 PM »
Let me start by offering what might come as a surprising answer:

No -- Kaplan is not necessary.

However, let me qualify that a little bit.

You mentioned that you are good at self-teaching. That's great. However, you only have one book that will provide strategies and the rest are merely books with tests. Unlike in a class, you won't be able to ask questions if you don't understand something. Obviously, you have these message boards (filled with helpful, knowledgable people), but you won't always get consistent feedback.

The true value of a course comes from the instructor (which is why many people strongly recommend doing your research properly and talking to the instructor before choosing a class), free workshops, and the materials provided. In terms of Kaplan, this means access to every single PrepTest from 1-56 plus any unnumbered PrepTests (including February exams and the June 2007). I can provide more info on the materials, workshops and the online reports we provide if you'd like. Feel free to PM me.

In addition, the classes are there not only to introduce strategies and methods for every portion of the test, but also to reinforce those methods and help you master them. And again, the class is a place you get to have all your questions answered.

Classes work extremely well for people who need structure, who need that strong push, who learn better in a classroom environment, and who learn better when working with others. For the many people I've worked with who have seen such great improvements, the cost of the course was worth it.

It's a decision you have to make. Your best bet is to go to a local Kaplan center and talk to an instructor -- not a salesperson, an instructor. And if you do decide to go with a Kaplan course, you can return most of the books you purchased because they simply contain test questions that will come automatically with the Kaplan course.

- Chris

link9124

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Re: Kaplan prep-is it really needed?
« Reply #2 on: May 21, 2009, 12:05:17 PM »
I found Kaplan to be really helpful becuase it kept me on a tight study schedule, Good luck

mdbutler71

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Re: Kaplan prep-is it really needed?
« Reply #3 on: May 21, 2009, 01:17:13 PM »
....you have these message boards (filled with helpful, knowledgable people), but you won't always get consistent feedback.

Yes, I find it particularly helpful when people write every "test be hardest"!

lsatbeard

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Re: Kaplan prep-is it really needed?
« Reply #4 on: May 22, 2009, 12:14:38 PM »
....you have these message boards (filled with helpful, knowledgable people), but you won't always get consistent feedback.

Yes, I find it particularly helpful when people write every "test be hardest"!

You welcome. Me and Julie here for you.

Zoltetov

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Re: Kaplan prep-is it really needed?
« Reply #5 on: May 24, 2009, 12:18:33 AM »
If you need the structure, then you'd probably get a lot out of it.  However, imho, their strategies, especially on the logic games section, are needlessly complicated.  You spend a great deal of time learning differences between the types of logic games, the potential set-up for these different types, etc...  The problem is, you spend time learning all of that, instead of simply learning LSAT tendencies and strategies.  You can spend hours analyzing differences between game types, or you can take the same time and realize that there is a finite list of question types, and they tend to be repeated over and over, despite the differences in game types.  If you focus on learning the rules and making deductions based on the rules, then none of the other stuff really matters. 

I've done thousands of game questions over the years as a private tutor, and rarely has it ever became an issue whether the game was a sequencing, or hybrid, or matching, or grouping, or whatever.  The strategy remains the same, the question types are all similar, and the traps are certainly all the same.  I'd focus on learning those things; tendencies, strategies, traps, and how to properly deduce facts from the rules, and you'll be fine. 

Just my two cents.

While their materials provide mostly decent practice tests and questions, I've found, more often then not, their explanations to be inadequate, and in some cases, useless.  Its all up to you and what you're comfortable with.  I'd investigate local law schools and see if they have recommendations for private tutors.  You can potentially save a lot of money and get a lot more out of it.