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Author Topic: 2L Scheduling  (Read 758 times)

nomargfan5

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2L Scheduling
« on: May 14, 2009, 08:11:10 PM »
I need some help. I'm scheduling tonight and am not sure if there are classes you should take together or if a combination of classes would be too much for one semester to handle. Ignoring when finals are, which 5 classes would you take in a semester?   here are my choices:

1. Evidence
2. Basic Federal Income
3. Labor Law
4. Corporations
5. Pro Rep
6. Family Law
7. Trusts & Estates
8. Admin Law
9. White Collar Crime

Diet Yomajesty

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Re: 2L Scheduling
« Reply #1 on: May 14, 2009, 08:15:37 PM »
What do you want to be when you grow up?
How were your grades last year?
Do you care what your grades are like next year?
Does your school have a forced curve for classes with a certain number of enrolled students?
Do you have a way to check enrollment counts for these upcoming classes?
Do you have access to the grade distributions for past offerings of these classes?
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Not so much because you resemble Erik Estrada, more so because you have the personality of cardboard.

nomargfan5

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Re: 2L Scheduling
« Reply #2 on: May 14, 2009, 08:22:36 PM »
WOW. I have not considered any of these questions at all, except what I want to do when I grow up. I am interested in Labor Law, so that is up there for that reason.

I was an average student

I do care what my grades are like next semester

I have no idea actually about the forced curve for classes with a certain number of enrolled students, but i can see why that would be an important consideration

I do have a way to check the enrollment counts

I do not have access to grade distributions for past offerings of these classes


Diet Yomajesty

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Re: 2L Scheduling
« Reply #3 on: May 14, 2009, 09:07:29 PM »
If you can find a copy of your student handbook (maybe on your intranet if not among your files), it might (should, I dare say) talk about the forced curve.

If you can find that, check the current enrollments and try to get at least 1 or 2 classes that are below the forced curve. Most of your classmates will be trying to stuff in as many pre-reqs as possible next semester, so many of the ones you listed will be quite full. Not much you can do to avoid that, but you could always consider leaving some of the non-essentials for your 3rd year, after you've had your 2L year to boost your GPA as much as possible. Maybe like Trusts & Estates and Admin Law, if you don't plan to take anything for which those are pre-reqs. What is Pro Rep?
Does your school offer any wee small classes that sound kind of specialized and/or boring, but with a very low enrollment cap and maybe a paper to write instead of a final exam? Wouldn't hurt to add in one or two of those, if you prefer papers to exams.

Income Tax is what a lot of people at my school save their pass/fail option for. I probably will too. :D
Quote from: Tim Mitchell
You could leave a cardboard cutout of Erik Estrada at the front counter and I guarantee you no one would ever know the difference.
Not so much because you resemble Erik Estrada, more so because you have the personality of cardboard.

wrhssaxensemble

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Re: 2L Scheduling
« Reply #4 on: May 18, 2009, 09:08:43 AM »
Most of your classmates will be trying to stuff in as many pre-reqs as possible next semester, so many of the ones you listed will be quite full. Not much you can do to avoid that, but you could always consider leaving some of the non-essentials for your 3rd year, after you've had your 2L year to boost your GPA as much as possible. Maybe like Trusts & Estates and Admin Law, if you don't plan to take anything for which those are pre-reqs. What is Pro Rep?
Does your school offer any wee small classes that sound kind of specialized and/or boring, but with a very low enrollment cap and maybe a paper to write instead of a final exam? Wouldn't hurt to add in one or two of those, if you prefer papers to exams.

Income Tax is what a lot of people at my school save their pass/fail option for. I probably will too. :D

I agree completely. I am in the JD-MBA program so I have more flexibility as far as which classes I take when but less flexibility when it comes to credit numbers. I want to do either transactional work or estate planning so ordered my courses accordingly...

Fall 2L- Basic Tax, Trusts and Estates, Advanced Contracts, MBA Courses

Spring 2l- Lawyer's Professional Responsibility (which I think is what he meant by Pro Rep), Business Organizations (Corps, LLC's partnerships, agency, sole proprietorships), Business Tax (subchapters S,C and K) and MBA Courses

Next Fall (3L)- Evidence (I put this last since I dont really see myself as much of a litigator), judicial externship, bankruptcy, estate and gift tax and 2 MBA courses

Next Spring (3L) tenative- UCC/Commercial Law, Estate and Financial Planning, Advanced Bankruptcy, elder law, MBA courses

Fall (4L) tenative- Secured Transactions, Business Planning, either Admin or Alternative Dispute Resolution and Trial Practice (just in case)


so I was/will be able to take all of my school's core courses except maybe Admin which I am debating whether to take at all.... I would definately recommend scheduling in such a way that T&E is added to your harder semester because it is a relatively easy course... Tax isn't too bad either if you have the right professor; if you don't it can be unbearable

I heard evidence, admin and UCC are tough and Bus Orgs was tough for me but that had more to do with the professor than anything else

I agree about the smaller classes too... great way to bump up your GPA and rank... plus your school might have a list of grade distributions for each course that would  be helpful to look at to determine how specific professors generally grade.