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Author Topic: Soon-to-be-1L: What materials do I bring to class in law school?  (Read 3489 times)

Esco

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Re: Soon-to-be-1L: What materials do I bring to class in law school?
« Reply #10 on: May 11, 2009, 01:34:46 PM »
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mtbrider59

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Re: Soon-to-be-1L: What materials do I bring to class in law school?
« Reply #11 on: May 11, 2009, 02:09:14 PM »
Also bring:
1) an open mind, cause if you're adamantly stuck to one opinion on something, the prof will probably nail you for it
2) a sense of humor, not all of it has to be serious, sometimes a lighter viewpoint can reveal nuances you might not otherwise find in taking it all serious,
and 3) a thick skin- you'll likely at some point be criticized or told you're wrong by the prof- take it in stride its part of the learning experience
and finally 4)respect for your classmates- they're all intelligent or they wouldn't be there plus you're likely to learn as much if not more from them than the prof

Denny Shore

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Re: Soon-to-be-1L: What materials do I bring to class in law school?
« Reply #12 on: June 08, 2009, 05:00:57 PM »
Also bring:
1) an open mind, cause if you're adamantly stuck to one opinion on something, the prof will probably nail you for it
2) a sense of humor, not all of it has to be serious, sometimes a lighter viewpoint can reveal nuances you might not otherwise find in taking it all serious,
and 3) a thick skin- you'll likely at some point be criticized or told you're wrong by the prof- take it in stride its part of the learning experience
and finally 4)respect for your classmates- they're all intelligent or they wouldn't be there plus you're likely to learn as much if not more from them than the prof

I agree with most of this, especially the respect bits.  However, not every law student in intelligent.  I was once asked by a female classmate if I was a "stewardess" (I'm a dude) because of my rolling book bag.  Stewardess' are called flight attendants now, which wasn't my issue.  My issue was that stewardess' are ALL female.

I also had a fellow classmate scream at a professor during class because he told her to stop asking for help from people around her, he asked HER a question, not her and her friends.

And I think every law student has a story about that person in law school who stayed clueless all semester, claimed to be studying 10 hours a day when they were really at the bars when they weren't in class, and ended up gone because they didn't have any idea what everyone else had learned.  Pretending to be smart doesn't make you smart.  I've known far too many people who got amazing grades in college by slacking their way through it.  Law students are not always intelligent.

I would add one:
respect for your professors.  Trust me, their job is tough.

TarHeels2929

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Re: Soon-to-be-1L: What materials do I bring to class in law school?
« Reply #13 on: June 19, 2009, 11:41:19 AM »
I would recommend not buying/using any of the Legalines/Casebook summaries, at least for your first year.  The whole point of law school, aside from torture, is to train you to think like a lawyer.  This means it is important for you to learn how to read a case, pick out the issue, pertinent facts, the law used, and how the law was applied.  It seems really tough in the beginning but if you stick with it, you will find it becomes much easier throughout the semester.  In my opinion, these casebook summaries only hinder your ability to learn because they are doing some of the work for you.  I'm sure most of us are paying out the ass for law school, so why not get all you can out of it?  Also, it will pay off come exam time because most essays are just one big case brief where you have to issue spot and then apply the law to the facts. 

Just a suggestion... either way, good luck with law school

eat it

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Re: Soon-to-be-1L: What materials do I bring to class in law school?
« Reply #14 on: June 20, 2009, 10:23:33 AM »

I agree with most of this, especially the respect bits.  However, not every law student in intelligent.  I was once asked by a female classmate if I was a "stewardess" (I'm a dude) because of my rolling book bag.  Stewardess' are called flight attendants now, which wasn't my issue.  My issue was that stewardess' are ALL female.


She was calling you a girl because you have a rolling bag.  Dumbass.  And I find it fascinating that you're calling other people stupid and you don't know the difference between the possessive and plural form of "stewardess".

eat it

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Re: Soon-to-be-1L: What materials do I bring to class in law school?
« Reply #15 on: June 20, 2009, 04:01:45 PM »
You forgot to point out that a lot of people skip class, don't study, go to bars, and do well.  So I'm thinking we ought to insult this guy's social life.

Also, as far as Legalines go, they are mainly helpful as review at the end of the semester--just, yeah, not as a daily substitute for the casebook.

I stopped reading his post after the misused apostrophes.  I don't know a single person who claimed to study 10 hours a day while they were really at the bar.  I know a few people who were often at bars, but they certainly didn't claim to work hard.  Mostly you get kids saying they studied 10-12 hours when they actually studied 6.

In conclusion, that guy is an idiot.

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Re: Soon-to-be-1L: What materials do I bring to class in law school?
« Reply #16 on: June 20, 2009, 07:30:24 PM »
Also bring:
1) an open mind, cause if you're adamantly stuck to one opinion on something, the prof will probably nail you for it
2) a sense of humor, not all of it has to be serious, sometimes a lighter viewpoint can reveal nuances you might not otherwise find in taking it all serious,
and 3) a thick skin- you'll likely at some point be criticized or told you're wrong by the prof- take it in stride its part of the learning experience
and finally 4)respect for your classmates- they're all intelligent or they wouldn't be there plus you're likely to learn as much if not more from them than the prof

I agree with most of this, especially the respect bits.  However, not every law student in intelligent.  I was once asked by a female classmate if I was a "stewardess" (I'm a dude) because of my rolling book bag.  Stewardess' are called flight attendants now, which wasn't my issue.  My issue was that stewardess' are ALL female.

I also had a fellow classmate scream at a professor during class because he told her to stop asking for help from people around her, he asked HER a question, not her and her friends.

And I think every law student has a story about that person in law school who stayed clueless all semester, claimed to be studying 10 hours a day when they were really at the bars when they weren't in class, and ended up gone because they didn't have any idea what everyone else had learned.  Pretending to be smart doesn't make you smart.  I've known far too many people who got amazing grades in college by slacking their way through it.  Law students are not always intelligent.

I would add one:
respect for your professors.  Trust me, their job is tough.

I'm sure it must be tough to have to publish three, if not four, law review articles before earning tenure.  Also, they grade all those exams twice a year! 

Denny Shore

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Re: Soon-to-be-1L: What materials do I bring to class in law school?
« Reply #17 on: June 26, 2009, 05:41:43 PM »

I agree with most of this, especially the respect bits.  However, not every law student in intelligent.  I was once asked by a female classmate if I was a "stewardess" (I'm a dude) because of my rolling book bag.  Stewardess' are called flight attendants now, which wasn't my issue.  My issue was that stewardess' are ALL female.


She was calling you a girl because you have a rolling bag.  Dumbass.  And I find it fascinating that you're calling other people stupid and you don't know the difference between the possessive and plural form of "stewardess".


Since you weren't there, how can you say what she meant?
For my own amusement, allow me to provide my recollection of the actual discussion instead of everyone relying on your fallacious assumptions.  Funny how you call me stupid, then reflect your own stupidity by jumping to a conclusion based on absolutely nothing more than what I wrote.
her (upon seeing my rolling bag): Are you a stewardess?
me: what?
her: you know, your bag.  Are you a stewardess?
me: How could I attend law school full time while being a stewardess?
her: You could totally do that!
me: nope.  Plus, how could I be a stewardess if that term is the female version of the word steward?
her: Oh my god, whatever.
me: All stewardesses are female, are you calling me a woman?
her: no, I'm asking if you are a flight attendant.
me: no.  I am not a flight attendant.  I am especially not a female flight attendant.
That's about how the convo went.
As for your ridiculously childish nitpicking, blow me.  This is a forum, not a grammar competition.  If you enjoy the idea of picking on people for grammatical mistakes, perhaps you would like to revise your erroneous sentence structure.  The word "Dumbass." is not a sentence and it is improper to being a sentence with the word "And".  Just pointing that out makes me feel like a feminine hygiene product.
Additionally, I have other anecdotal evidence that speaks to the person in questions stupidity, but that's not important right now.  What is important is that you have proven to be a grade A feminine hygiene product.  Congratulations!  Your post has accidentally proven my point - there are a lot of people unworthy of respect that are either currently or planning to attend law school.  Sometimes that can be attributed to their intelligence and sometimes that comes down to the fact that some people (read: folks like you) think they are smarter than everyone else and choose to pretend that others around them are morons when, in fact, they are childish buffoons with low self esteem and poor social skills.
Now, go find other posts with spelling, punctuation, or grammatical errors.  Please notice them, get all worked up about it, and then shut the f*(k up about it.  Lest we forget, this is an online forum, not a law journal.  Get your head out of your ass and grow up a bit please.  Ok?  Thanks!

Denny Shore

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Re: Soon-to-be-1L: What materials do I bring to class in law school?
« Reply #18 on: June 26, 2009, 05:46:06 PM »
Also bring:
1) an open mind, cause if you're adamantly stuck to one opinion on something, the prof will probably nail you for it
2) a sense of humor, not all of it has to be serious, sometimes a lighter viewpoint can reveal nuances you might not otherwise find in taking it all serious,
and 3) a thick skin- you'll likely at some point be criticized or told you're wrong by the prof- take it in stride its part of the learning experience
and finally 4)respect for your classmates- they're all intelligent or they wouldn't be there plus you're likely to learn as much if not more from them than the prof

I agree with most of this, especially the respect bits.  However, not every law student in intelligent.  I was once asked by a female classmate if I was a "stewardess" (I'm a dude) because of my rolling book bag.  Stewardess' are called flight attendants now, which wasn't my issue.  My issue was that stewardess' are ALL female.

I also had a fellow classmate scream at a professor during class because he told her to stop asking for help from people around her, he asked HER a question, not her and her friends.

And I think every law student has a story about that person in law school who stayed clueless all semester, claimed to be studying 10 hours a day when they were really at the bars when they weren't in class, and ended up gone because they didn't have any idea what everyone else had learned.  Pretending to be smart doesn't make you smart.  I've known far too many people who got amazing grades in college by slacking their way through it.  Law students are not always intelligent.

I would add one:
respect for your professors.  Trust me, their job is tough.

I'm sure it must be tough to have to publish three, if not four, law review articles before earning tenure.  Also, they grade all those exams twice a year! 
Excellent point.  However, you may be underestimating how difficult it is to teach the law to a class full of students, many of whom believe that they are extremely smart and that law school is merely a formality.  Teaching can be very difficult.  Teachers require patience, the ability to communicate exceptionally well, and a well developed sense for how well their students understand the material as presented.  That said, many law school profs (in my experience) are terrible teachers.  Regardless, it is a solid idea to show them respect, especially in light of the fact that they have control over your grades.  At my school, teachers can raise or lower a grade by up to a full letter based on classroom participation, meaning disrespectful students (there are some) can be dinged a grade for being insufferable pricks....

Denny Shore

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Re: Soon-to-be-1L: What materials do I bring to class in law school?
« Reply #19 on: June 26, 2009, 05:49:27 PM »
You forgot to point out that a lot of people skip class, don't study, go to bars, and do well.  So I'm thinking we ought to insult this guy's social life.

Also, as far as Legalines go, they are mainly helpful as review at the end of the semester--just, yeah, not as a daily substitute for the casebook.

I stopped reading his post after the misused apostrophes.  I don't know a single person who claimed to study 10 hours a day while they were really at the bar.  I know a few people who were often at bars, but they certainly didn't claim to work hard.  Mostly you get kids saying they studied 10-12 hours when they actually studied 6.

In conclusion, that guy is an idiot.
I guess since YOU don't know anyone like that, none exists.
You are going to make an incredibly bad lawyer if you continue to assume everyone's life experience simply MUST be the same as yours...
Keep proving your own idiocy.  That's sure to work in your favor.  Here's an idea!  Why not use fallacious logic to argue every point anyone makes?  That way, when you piss everyone else off, this forum can be all yours!
Genius!