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Author Topic: Creative uses for my useless degree brainstorming session!  (Read 6719 times)

NYCFed

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Re: Creative uses for my useless degree brainstorming session!
« Reply #10 on: April 29, 2009, 05:14:39 PM »
Quote
Considered federal law enforcement?  Although, if you don't want to just push paper, you may want to avoid the FBI.

With base pay + locality + 25% LEAP, most investigation types jobs pay over 50k starting out and early pay increases come fairly quickly.

There are tons of agencies, DEA, ATF, ICE, USSS, DSS (Diplomatic Security Service, if you want to or wouldn't mind living in Maputo), NCIS, AFOSI, etc
Can you go into greater detail about what I would be qualified to do here?  I don't have any police/military training, I'm not old, and I don't have any kind of science or semi-science background.  Would I still be a reasonable candidate for these organizations?  And can you give me an idea of what I would be doing?  Assessing/interpreting intelligence?  Being a "field" agent and basically a federal cop?  Detective or quasi-detective?  What are the exit options like?
This is definitely something that interests me, but I know so little about it.

A JD should be enough to at least get an interview with any of those agencies as an 1811 criminal investigator (or, if you prefer, "special agent").
There is a lot of variety there, and each agency has different tasks, and the work in one office may be different from the work in the same agency in another office.  You could be doing anything from kicking down doors as part of a raid to poring through website logs to build a case (which you could then use to get an arrest warrant and possibly execute the warrant).

These jobs typically are noncompetitive promotions to GS-13, and you can retire with 25 years at any age, or just 20 years and age 50, so going route leaves you ample time to start a second career while drawing a pension.  Also, you can wear shades, like this guy http://www.state.gov/cms_images/0125.jpg

Another great thing about any of these is that you can take your time for retirement and leave calculations with you if you go from one federal government job to another, and you usually keep your base salary.  So if, for example, you developed a good relationship with a US Attorney's office working as an investigator, you could get hired with them as an assistant US attorney, and not be starting from scratch, salary-wise.

www.911jobforums.com/forumdisplay.php?f=58 and officer.com are good places for agency specific information and rumors, as well as the agency websites themselves.

dischord

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Re: Creative uses for my useless degree brainstorming session!
« Reply #11 on: April 30, 2009, 11:54:05 PM »
I think you really need to reframe this question . . . I mean, the career tradeoff is certainly a significant concern, but the deciding factor IMHO really should be whether or not you want to join the military.  And I don't mean, like, oh physical training might be cool.

Yes, I know that being an officer, and certainly being an attorney, in the military is quite different from being your average 17 y.o. recruit in active combat.  But they flat out own you until you've done your time, and they can (and perhaps, or even likely, will, given the current state of affairs) deploy you.  Even though they don't put you in active combat, you may end up in some very dangerous places and seeing things that are quite upsetting.  The take on it I've gotten from family who did long-term service is that it was a really valuable experience in many ways.  But they've cautioned a couple of my friends who were considering similar options (officer school or JAG) that if they weren't 100% committed to the idea of being in the military they definitely shouldn't go. 

(As an aside, I hope no one takes this as anything other than politically neutral).
At least I can f-ing think.

NYCFed

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Re: Creative uses for my useless degree brainstorming session!
« Reply #12 on: May 01, 2009, 07:56:14 AM »
Marine Corps OCS is an awesome experience, I did PLC between my first two years of college.  Quantico is much more enjoyable than Parris Island, and much more physically demanding.
You don't have to think of it as giving years of your life away just for going to Quantico.  If you're there and you decide it's not for you, I believe you can still voluntarily drop out after the first few weeks.  I'm sure no one wants to go thinking they may quit, but it may help alleviate some of the cons of deciding so quickly.
Also, Veteran's preference will be a big help in getting any government jobs after you get out.

dischord

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Re: Creative uses for my useless degree brainstorming session!
« Reply #13 on: May 01, 2009, 09:23:31 AM »

The "owning your life" part is what concerns me the most.  I am (very) good at "getting over bad things" but I would prefer having freedom and stuff.  I like good meals, sleeping 8 hours, and having my own room. 


Yeah, also, if you have any issues with authority this might not be the best idea . . . and I'd be more concerned about the total lack of choice you'd have coming out of school and for years after.  I don't know anything about your personal life, how old you are, etc. but a lot can happen in two years . . . you might decide you really want to stay in the city you're in now, you might decide you really want to live in California, someone in your family might get sick and you want to move home . . . who knows.  But if you take this offer, once you're out, you're going wherever the Marines tell you, and it will be for a long time and it may not be somewhere pleasant.  You just don't know.

Maybe you should talk to your dad/your family.  I mean, I'm sure you have, but if I were considering this I think that my dad's opinion would carry the most weight having done it himself.  (Although I'm pretty sure my dad would tell me I absolutely shouldn't go, but that's mostly because my reaction to being told what to do is usually along the lines of "Oh yeah?  @#!* YOU."  :D)

Anyway, good luck.  I think it might be a really great experience, but they don't throw in all of those perks for nothing.  For people who are suited for it, it's the best thing that's ever happened to them, but for people who aren't, it's absolute hell.

OH, and also re: the quoted text -- you won't generally get any of that stuff doing Biglaw, so I think you've sort of created a false dichotomy.  They own you in their own way.
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Matthies

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Re: Creative uses for my useless degree brainstorming session!
« Reply #14 on: May 01, 2009, 10:15:16 AM »
If what you really want is to be a midlaw/big law lawyer why donít you just start networking. Now, you got 2 years to get yourself ingrained in the working legal community. Who you know beats what grades you get if you know the right people. Networking is allot easier path to mid law then the other things you have been talking about.
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