Law School Discussion

Introductory logic book

Introductory logic book
« on: April 15, 2009, 01:59:48 PM »
I have heard that a great, effective way to prep for the LSAT was to pick up an introductory logic book.  Any reccomendations or personal experience?

Re: Introductory logic book
« Reply #1 on: April 16, 2009, 02:00:39 PM »
By all means, study logic for its own sake. It cannot hurt, but truth tables, venn diagrams, etc. are outside the scope of the LSAT. You would be better off sitting down with a LSAT tutor or taking a LSAT course if you can afford them or buying all of Powerscore's LSAT Bibles and taking a bunch of practice tests.

Re: Introductory logic book
« Reply #2 on: April 16, 2009, 03:07:16 PM »
I'm using the Powerscore Bibles now.  I believe even Powerscore recommends finding an intro to logic book.

Re: Introductory logic book
« Reply #3 on: April 16, 2009, 05:27:26 PM »
An intro to Logic book would have helpful information, but it would also contain information which is beyond the scope of the LSAT. If you knew what to zone in on within the logic book, then I suppose it couldn't really hurt to look through it, but if you ended up spending time studying material irrelevant to the LSAT, then not only might it not help your score, but it could hurt it, because the time you're spending trying to understand concepts that you will not need to know for the LSAT, could have been spent trying to understand concepts that you will need to know.


phreejazz

Re: Introductory logic book
« Reply #4 on: April 16, 2009, 05:51:32 PM »
I have heard that a great, effective way to prep for the LSAT was to pick up an introductory logic book.  Any reccomendations or personal experience?

I agree with the other person who posted, formal logic is a worthy study in and of itself.  Most of it is beyond what is needed or all that helpful for the LSAT, though the *training* of logic is a bonus.  Here's where I can see some help from studying formal logic: quickly symbolizing contrapositives.  In the Logical Games sections I looked at, if any of the game 'rules' had a series of conditional statements (like: if Henry is bald then Mary must be in the fourth row) the questions and their answers quite often dealt directly with the contrapositives of those conditional statements.  Not a big deal, and might save a few seconds on the test, perhaps.

EarlCat

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Re: Introductory logic book
« Reply #5 on: April 16, 2009, 08:57:58 PM »
I don't know about an intro logic book, but in my experience (anecdotal evidence alert), students who had taken formal logic in college had more trouble from "overthinking" LSAT questions than students who didn't.

Re: Introductory logic book
« Reply #6 on: April 17, 2009, 04:15:04 PM »
I believe
Belief never entails truth.

Look at page 199 of the LR Bible to the side; it basically says that even though some discussions in a formal logic text are interesting many subjects do not apply to the LSAT.

I am trying to help you out. If you want a better LSAT score then only study the types of logic you will be tested on. Do not muddle your mind with a bunch of concepts that will actually be counterproductive on the test. Instead, you should practice as many LSAT problems as possible and forget about working out of a formal logic/critical thinking text.

Re: Introductory logic book
« Reply #7 on: April 17, 2009, 07:35:55 PM »
No matter what your situation, you only have so much free time to prepare for the test.  I think studying for the test itself would be a much better use of it.

Re: Introductory logic book
« Reply #8 on: April 20, 2009, 09:20:02 PM »
I have heard that a great, effective way to prep for the LSAT was to pick up an introductory logic book.  Any reccomendations or personal experience?

ExamKrackers.com has a good introductor book for studying the LSAT logic games.

Re: Introductory logic book
« Reply #9 on: April 20, 2009, 10:55:37 PM »
Unnecessary.