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Author Topic: Hofstra law v. Saint John's law  (Read 1645 times)

blahblah140

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Hofstra law v. Saint John's law
« on: April 08, 2009, 10:12:54 AM »
I have been admitted into both Hofstra and Saint John's, and have yet to receive an award letter from either. Saint John's has admitted me into their summer program, in which I have to take tort law and get at least a B- in order to be fully enrolled for the fall semester.  Is it worth the risk? Or should I reserve my seat at Hofstra? 

*I am also waiting on Cardozo and Rutgers-Newark.

RobWreck

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Re: Hofstra law v. Saint John's law
« Reply #1 on: April 08, 2009, 03:59:57 PM »
What you have from St. John's is one of their probationary admits... it's not that hard to pull a B- or better in the summer class, and it does lighten up your load for the fall semester. Several people in the PT program were admitted under those circumstances... then again, I wouldn't know about any that weren't offered such admissions. The curve is fairly generous... I *believe* that only about 20% of the curve is below a B-.
As for recieving any sort of award letter, I don't think they send them out seperately... I recieved mine from Hofstra & St. John's in the acceptance letter. With the probationary admit @ St. John's, you can pretty much forget about getting any sort of scholarship money there. As for Hofstra, maybe you can get a few bucks from them.
As for whether you should go w/ St. John's or Hofstra, you should probably visit both schools and check them out for yourself. Hofstra is the Long Island law school... so don't expect much in the way of job opportunity outside of Long Island. SJU has more connections within NYC (and strangely, Miami), so you do have more options there. Take a look at clinical opportunities as well. I will say that Hofstra has/had some good teachers... one of SJU's Contracts professors was formerly at Hofstra and one of the Property professors is a visting professor from Hofstra.
Good luck,
Rob

St. John's University School of Law '11
Part-time PM Division
Admitted in NY

k0em9u

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Re: Hofstra law v. Saint John's law
« Reply #2 on: April 08, 2009, 08:35:39 PM »
Your school preference should certainly look like: Cardozo > Rutgers > StJohns > Hofstra

That B- thing sounds weird. Is this a curved class? If so, it seems a bit sketchy to me. If it's not, I'm sure a B- is a walk in the park.

I would guess that even if it is curved, they are using a really flat curve to pretty much have everyone in the Bsomething range, but you would want to look into this.
Sue me female dog, I know a lawyer.

Laythesmack23

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Re: Hofstra law v. Saint John's law
« Reply #3 on: April 08, 2009, 09:04:04 PM »
Tort Law is Easy... I'm getting an B+, A-. Should be no problem if you got accepted to both schools. Good Job, and Congrat's on your acceptance.

k0em9u

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Re: Hofstra law v. Saint John's law
« Reply #4 on: April 08, 2009, 09:23:41 PM »
The entire concept of a curved grade really means that easy or hard doesn't matter. If they have a curve that says x amount of people will fail, then x will fail, whether the exam is easy as shits or the worst ever.
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bryan9584

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Re: Hofstra law v. Saint John's law
« Reply #5 on: April 09, 2009, 11:05:22 AM »
Usually the question is not who fails, its usually who gets the A's and who gets the C's while the rest fall in between. (occasionally there are D's and F's, but my theory is you have to be either completely stupid or just not do any work at all to fail a class)

k0em9u

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Re: Hofstra law v. Saint John's law
« Reply #6 on: April 09, 2009, 04:55:36 PM »
Usually the question is not who fails, its usually who gets the A's and who gets the C's while the rest fall in between. (occasionally there are D's and F's, but my theory is you have to be either completely stupid or just not do any work at all to fail a class)

In the scenario of the OP however, getting less than B- = failing, since he would be without a law school seat.
Sue me female dog, I know a lawyer.

blahblah140

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Re: Hofstra law v. Saint John's law
« Reply #7 on: April 09, 2009, 07:59:39 PM »
Quote from: bryan9584 on Today at 12:05:22 PM
Usually the question is not who fails, its usually who gets the A's and who gets the C's while the rest fall in between. (occasionally there are D's and F's, but my theory is you have to be either completely stupid or just not do any work at all to fail a class)


In the scenario of the OP however, getting less than B- = failing, since he would be without a law school seat



exactly...so while I am pretty sure I can get above a B-, in the event that something crazy happens and I don't I wont go anywhere...and I think that looming reality makes my other choices (Hofstra, hopefully Rutgers and Cardozo) much more appealing.

k0em9u

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Re: Hofstra law v. Saint John's law
« Reply #8 on: April 09, 2009, 09:01:51 PM »
Well, Rutgers and Cardozo should be winners in either case. I can see an argument being made both ways for St Johns vs Rutgers, but Cardozo is a good bit ahead.
Sue me female dog, I know a lawyer.