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Author Topic: taft law school  (Read 22662 times)

aubray1986

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Re: taft law school
« Reply #40 on: August 20, 2014, 07:02:31 PM »
Taft law school does in fact let you sit for the bar. However, each state to their own is different in the requirements. I currently reside in the state of California where Taft is located. For the last 3 years I have been monitoring the online capabilities of going to a law school online. Though not necessarily approved by the ABA (which is a private organization by the way) here in California graduates of Taft can and do site for the BAR EVERY YEAR.

Recently, i graduated with a DUAL Bachelors Degree from an accredited online degree program through known as Walden University. I found I was able to do much better as it cut out the BS of attending a Brick and Mortar structured system.

In the state of California to practice law many people do not realize you actually do NOT have to attend an ABA school to practice law. In fact many personal friends of mine completed their law degrees by working directly underneath a Judge or already practicing attorney. In California you are required to inform the actual state of your intent to practice law in this method. This information can be found by reading the following link which redirects you to the ACTUAL STATE WEBSITE: https://www.calbarxap.com/ Taft Law school is also accredited.

Though NOT THROUGH THE ABA- They are accredited through Distance Education and Training Council, by having this accreditation student are eligible for Financial Aid which- for those of you who may be unaware means you can ACTUALLY GET A LAW DEGREE, FROM A LAW SCHOOL, AND TAKE THE BAR.

To be a great lawyer I would suggest those of you who read this to learn what is means to actually conduct research. In the event whether you graduated from an ABA school or non= ABA- as an attorney you must set forth a moral obligation to ensure you are obtaining all the FACTS and not just listening to misleading and incorrect feedback from those who may have a personal interest or could be benefiting financially by making misleading or not presenting all the truths.

If you are planning on attending law school ask yourself these 7 questions?
1. What do I want to get out of my education?
2. What is it financially I can truly afford?
3. Where do I want to practice Law?
4. What type of law do I want to practice?
5. Does the state I currently reside in allow distance learning?
6. What are my obligations to my family, friends, or job?
7. Is an online program right for me, or do I require a 'Brick and Mortar' setting?

Success in an online setting requires drive and dedication. You must be able to become self taught, stay true to your outline course, and rely on your own abilities to focused. If you can not successfully maintain your attention to you a computer screen at minimum 25 hours a week, most-likely this learning is not for you.


Maintain FL 350

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Re: taft law school
« Reply #41 on: August 20, 2014, 11:01:11 PM »
I think the seven points you listed are right on point. Distance learning and non-ABA law schools can be the right fit for the right student. It all depends on your goals, where you want to live and practice, and whether you are a highly motivated self starter. If so, I think it can work.

In fact many personal friends of mine completed their law degrees by working directly underneath a Judge or already practicing attorney.

CA is one of the few states that allows study in a judge's chambers or with an attorney, but very few people go this route. The number of individuals sitting for the bar exam via this method is usually in the single digits, and of those only a few pass.

Most people need the experience and structure of a law school (either brick and mortar or DL) to adequately prepare for the bar.

DeltaBravoKS

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Re: taft law school
« Reply #42 on: August 21, 2014, 07:02:07 AM »
Good writing skills, including grammar, are a big plus too!

Maintain FL 350

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Re: taft law school
« Reply #43 on: August 21, 2014, 03:27:43 PM »
Good writing skills, including grammar, are a big plus too!

I agree, and it's especially true when it comes to taking the bar exam. Those graders are blasting through hundreds of essays. If you can't state the answer in a clear, concise manner you're in trouble. 

barprephero

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Re: taft law school
« Reply #44 on: August 21, 2014, 06:45:39 PM »
Good writing skills, including grammar, are a big plus too!

I agree, and it's especially true when it comes to taking the bar exam. Those graders are blasting through hundreds of essays. If you can't state the answer in a clear, concise manner you're in trouble.

Not really. Unless you are talking a bar review or legal writing class. Just IRAC and you could have English skills that would flunk English1 in Freshman year of high school and still get an A-

bigdaddyju34

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Re: taft law school
« Reply #45 on: February 20, 2015, 11:08:48 AM »
So here we are in 2015. I wanted to post an update to my previous post in regards to Taft. So I started in Aug. 2013 at Taft. I have completed the first year of school at Taft but I have made the decision to not continue at Taft. My reasoning is that now we have ABA accredited hybrid programs that will allow you to complete most of the course online and have 1-2 weeks per semester at the actual campus doing a very rigorous program with many hours put in those 2 weeks. I did not go on to take the CA FYLSX. I made great grades on my homework and tests at Taft and was considered a leader in the chat rooms and discussion boards. I just get it and some do not get it. You have to put the time in or you will never make it. Anyway, I have now applied at William Mitchell for their hybrid program. I weighed my options and determined that it would be much more beneficial for me to attend an ABA program due to the fact that I am in a state that requires it and do not plan on moving to CA just to be an attorney. I thought upon first enrollment with Taft that I would at least see what the first year is like for a student since most people say this is the hardest year. This was a hard year but it can be done and now I do not feel like I would struggle with an ABA education. Taft provides a good education if you want to learn the material, but I did find that if you just want to learn the law, buy some text books on Amazon or somewhere and read them and brief the cases and then get on a discussion board such as this and throw your ideas out there for someone else to critique. That will help you understand if you are getting the concepts right. So all in all, if you want to learn the law and you need a school to do so or if you plan on practicing solo in CA then Taft may be the school for you. I am happy that I attended for one year and while I don't think the cost of this one year is a bargain for what you get, it did give me some experience in first year law so now I know about what to expect from somewhere else. Would I do it again? Absolutely.

HappyStudent

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Re: taft law school
« Reply #46 on: February 20, 2015, 01:23:17 PM »
Thank you for responding to my email and taking the time to write your experience. I wish I could do a hybrid program but I do not have a bachelors degree and a California school is perfect for me because I would like to practice in California after I pass the bar.
Thanks again and I wish you all the luck in your future,
Jahny

doctorlaw

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Re: taft law school
« Reply #47 on: February 20, 2015, 05:47:24 PM »
So here we are in 2015. I wanted to post an update to my previous post in regards to Taft. So I started in Aug. 2013 at Taft. I have completed the first year of school at Taft but I have made the decision to not continue at Taft. My reasoning is that now we have ABA accredited hybrid programs that will allow you to complete most of the course online and have 1-2 weeks per semester at the actual campus doing a very rigorous program with many hours put in those 2 weeks. I did not go on to take the CA FYLSX. I made great grades on my homework and tests at Taft and was considered a leader in the chat rooms and discussion boards. I just get it and some do not get it. You have to put the time in or you will never make it. Anyway, I have now applied at William Mitchell for their hybrid program. I weighed my options and determined that it would be much more beneficial for me to attend an ABA program due to the fact that I am in a state that requires it and do not plan on moving to CA just to be an attorney. I thought upon first enrollment with Taft that I would at least see what the first year is like for a student since most people say this is the hardest year. This was a hard year but it can be done and now I do not feel like I would struggle with an ABA education. Taft provides a good education if you want to learn the material, but I did find that if you just want to learn the law, buy some text books on Amazon or somewhere and read them and brief the cases and then get on a discussion board such as this and throw your ideas out there for someone else to critique. That will help you understand if you are getting the concepts right. So all in all, if you want to learn the law and you need a school to do so or if you plan on practicing solo in CA then Taft may be the school for you. I am happy that I attended for one year and while I don't think the cost of this one year is a bargain for what you get, it did give me some experience in first year law so now I know about what to expect from somewhere else. Would I do it again? Absolutely.
This strikes me as a "good money on top of bad" decision making moment. Where you had to decide whether to "have wasted" a year of 1L with a decent GPA or stay with it at non ABA when ABA was a feasible alternative for you.

I think you made the right choice FYI. I hope they somehow let you transfer in some of your classes. Have you asked them about that option? It seems doubtful but I would still for sure at least ask. Heck, even if you only get one class let in, that's still a win right?

Good luck. You may actually have an advantage on your classmates due to your experience.
Trust me...........I'm a "Doctor".

doctorlaw

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Re: taft law school
« Reply #48 on: February 20, 2015, 05:54:42 PM »
Thank you for responding to my email and taking the time to write your experience. I wish I could do a hybrid program but I do not have a bachelors degree and a California school is perfect for me because I would like to practice in California after I pass the bar.
Thanks again and I wish you all the luck in your future,
Jahny

THIS is what I think of when I think of online law school.
"I want to practice in CA" can ABA not practice in CA? If not, its a nonstarter.
"I cant because I don't have a BA" Well...........And? So? First there ARE ABA schools that take less than a BA just FYI on that (trust me, they are out there) Second, if you can't get into ABA then you shouldn't do online. If you can't get at least a 150 LSAT and have the focus to finish a BA then you are a statistic waiting to happen. DON'T BE THAT GUY.
You can do good in online or on campus, but ONLY if you raise yourself up to the ability first. Finish a BA online if you have to. Take LSAT prep and get a good score on it. THEN you will be ready for law school. Otherwise the first year exam is going to chew you up and spit you out and you will have nothing to show for it but wasted time and effort.

Its a seductive trap, criminally so in my view of it. Take people not smart enough to know they aren't smart enough. Feed them a lie about saving money and other false hopes. Don't do it.

That being said IF you are going to do at least enroll in a joint BA/JD program. That way if you don't pass the first year exam you can at least get a BA from it and use that to apply to real law schools. DON'T WALK AWAY WITH NOTHING.
(I can't think of links right now, but Know for a fact I've seen them out there-if other posters can post a few links on such programs that would be great in case future readers can benefit from it)
Trust me...........I'm a "Doctor".

bigdaddyju34

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Re: taft law school
« Reply #49 on: February 21, 2015, 11:21:04 AM »
I understand the posts about not wasting your money or wasting your time and my personal opinion is that i have not wasted anything. I gained valuable experience in coursework required for law and the ideas and concepts it takes to make decisions regarding the law. I have discussed with my admissions counselor about my current coursework and they will not accept any classes as a transfer from a non-ABA approved school. As far as the money goes, yes, saving the amount of one year with Taft would have been good, but I feel like it is a small price to pay to see if a $30k per year education is going to be what I want. I would rather pay $5k than $30k. Money was not my motivating factor in attending Taft and did not really even enter my mind since I could have cared less what it cost, it is the education and what you can do with it that matters most to me. Not that I will in the future but right now I am living comfortably and have set the necessary steps in place to maintain my lifestyle for a long period of time. So while money may be a motivating factor for other students if you are wanting your education bad enough then you will do what it takes. So this is what I weigh when I consider money involved. I live in NC, in state tuition at a location that is a minimum of 3 hours from where I reside is $12k at the least. Then you factor in moving your whole family for 3 years, either renting or buying another house and the cost of living in the urban areas it comes out to about the same as $30k per year for tuition where you can complete your education online and keep your status quo with employment and living arrangements seems to make more financial sense.

In regards to the Bachelors degree, I believe that if you have not finished your degree then you have no business continuing on with law. Sorry if that hurts your ego or feelings but its true. If you can't make it through the basics then you will never make it in law school. As far as the LSAT goes, I am torn in this space. I spent almost 6 months studying for this test and I am glad I did because I do not think I would have scored as high as I did if I did not study. This test is not a test you want to go in blind on. This test concepts that you really do not learn in college unless you were a philosophy major and/or took some formal logic classes. I understand why law schools use this test because you will hear the story from your client and then you must make your deductions from that truth, but I think law schools could come up with a better test that would actually test ability in law rather than critical thinking. Don't get me wrong, I do think there should be a critical thinking section, but come on! All A's are B's and Some B's are C's and Not all C's are D's will really get your mind scrambled and I struggle to find much relevance with law deductions on some of this crap, but it is what it is and you must follow suit. Anyway, that is my two cents on the matters. Did I waste a year of my time by not continuing with Taft? NO. Did I waste money by attending Taft? Not in my eyes, it was a valuable learning experience that will carry with me throughout everything I do, so I find value in that. Are people going to hate on you for your decisions? Always, so take it with stride and learn from it.

Thanks for having this chat and discussion forum!