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Author Topic: taft law school  (Read 21284 times)

aubray1986

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Re: taft law school
« Reply #40 on: August 20, 2014, 07:02:31 PM »
Taft law school does in fact let you sit for the bar. However, each state to their own is different in the requirements. I currently reside in the state of California where Taft is located. For the last 3 years I have been monitoring the online capabilities of going to a law school online. Though not necessarily approved by the ABA (which is a private organization by the way) here in California graduates of Taft can and do site for the BAR EVERY YEAR.

Recently, i graduated with a DUAL Bachelors Degree from an accredited online degree program through known as Walden University. I found I was able to do much better as it cut out the BS of attending a Brick and Mortar structured system.

In the state of California to practice law many people do not realize you actually do NOT have to attend an ABA school to practice law. In fact many personal friends of mine completed their law degrees by working directly underneath a Judge or already practicing attorney. In California you are required to inform the actual state of your intent to practice law in this method. This information can be found by reading the following link which redirects you to the ACTUAL STATE WEBSITE: https://www.calbarxap.com/ Taft Law school is also accredited.

Though NOT THROUGH THE ABA- They are accredited through Distance Education and Training Council, by having this accreditation student are eligible for Financial Aid which- for those of you who may be unaware means you can ACTUALLY GET A LAW DEGREE, FROM A LAW SCHOOL, AND TAKE THE BAR.

To be a great lawyer I would suggest those of you who read this to learn what is means to actually conduct research. In the event whether you graduated from an ABA school or non= ABA- as an attorney you must set forth a moral obligation to ensure you are obtaining all the FACTS and not just listening to misleading and incorrect feedback from those who may have a personal interest or could be benefiting financially by making misleading or not presenting all the truths.

If you are planning on attending law school ask yourself these 7 questions?
1. What do I want to get out of my education?
2. What is it financially I can truly afford?
3. Where do I want to practice Law?
4. What type of law do I want to practice?
5. Does the state I currently reside in allow distance learning?
6. What are my obligations to my family, friends, or job?
7. Is an online program right for me, or do I require a 'Brick and Mortar' setting?

Success in an online setting requires drive and dedication. You must be able to become self taught, stay true to your outline course, and rely on your own abilities to focused. If you can not successfully maintain your attention to you a computer screen at minimum 25 hours a week, most-likely this learning is not for you.


Maintain FL 350

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Re: taft law school
« Reply #41 on: August 20, 2014, 11:01:11 PM »
I think the seven points you listed are right on point. Distance learning and non-ABA law schools can be the right fit for the right student. It all depends on your goals, where you want to live and practice, and whether you are a highly motivated self starter. If so, I think it can work.

In fact many personal friends of mine completed their law degrees by working directly underneath a Judge or already practicing attorney.

CA is one of the few states that allows study in a judge's chambers or with an attorney, but very few people go this route. The number of individuals sitting for the bar exam via this method is usually in the single digits, and of those only a few pass.

Most people need the experience and structure of a law school (either brick and mortar or DL) to adequately prepare for the bar.

DeltaBravoKS

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Re: taft law school
« Reply #42 on: August 21, 2014, 07:02:07 AM »
Good writing skills, including grammar, are a big plus too!

Maintain FL 350

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Re: taft law school
« Reply #43 on: August 21, 2014, 03:27:43 PM »
Good writing skills, including grammar, are a big plus too!

I agree, and it's especially true when it comes to taking the bar exam. Those graders are blasting through hundreds of essays. If you can't state the answer in a clear, concise manner you're in trouble. 

Gunner.

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Re: taft law school
« Reply #44 on: August 21, 2014, 06:45:39 PM »
Good writing skills, including grammar, are a big plus too!

I agree, and it's especially true when it comes to taking the bar exam. Those graders are blasting through hundreds of essays. If you can't state the answer in a clear, concise manner you're in trouble.

Not really. Unless you are talking a bar review or legal writing class. Just IRAC and you could have English skills that would flunk English1 in Freshman year of high school and still get an A-