Law School Discussion

taft law school

Re: taft law school
« Reply #90 on: August 13, 2015, 06:35:26 PM »
Two hours may not be ideal, but one could split the difference and live an hour away from each.

Re: taft law school
« Reply #91 on: August 13, 2015, 07:09:42 PM »
Well back when I attended Taft it was about $1000 a year tuition and another $600 a year for the books and outlines.  Another $1000 for FYLSE related costs and maybe $1500 for the bar exam related costs.  So costs also used to be criteria but as I understand it the spread is not  that big anymorebetween DL and ABA law schools.  First full year out in solo practice I netted six figures.

So there are financial calculations there that might help mitigate extreme odds.
Did you have full undergrad prior to enrolling into Taft? Did you do it online or by correspondence? What was your undergrad GPA/Lawschool GPA?
Did you sit the LSAT? If so what score? Did you pass the FXBX and Bar Exam both on your first shot (or at all) and if so what was your MBE score?

Re: taft law school
« Reply #92 on: August 13, 2015, 08:38:46 PM »
I graduated from Taft in 1992.  I had a BA and was working full time for the county govt. when I started in 1988.  Taft did not require a LSAT but I had taken one earlier but dropped out of Golden Gate Law School after a few weeks because I didn't like the lectures.  My GPA at Taft was maybe 2.5 but I passed the FYLSE and Cal Bar on the first try each.  I didn't really pay any attention to the score.  I studied only to pass the FYLSE and Bar.  Within six months I was getting PD conflict and family law cases on a regular basis because I let every attorney in town know I would gladly take any cases they wanted to get rid of. 

I have no affiliation with Taft except as an alumni.

Re: taft law school
« Reply #93 on: August 13, 2015, 09:54:18 PM »
I graduated from Taft in 1992.  I had a BA and was working full time for the county govt. when I started in 1988.  Taft did not require a LSAT but I had taken one earlier but dropped out of Golden Gate Law School after a few weeks because I didn't like the lectures.  My GPA at Taft was maybe 2.5 but I passed the FYLSE and Cal Bar on the first try each.  I didn't really pay any attention to the score.  I studied only to pass the FYLSE and Bar.  Within six months I was getting PD conflict and family law cases on a regular basis because I let every attorney in town know I would gladly take any cases they wanted to get rid of. 

I have no affiliation with Taft except as an alumni.
You didn't mention the LSAT score, only that you sat it.
I still call BS on the rest of it FYI.

Re: taft law school
« Reply #94 on: August 14, 2015, 07:03:53 AM »
"You didn't mention the LSAT score, only that you sat it. I still call BS on the rest of it FYI"

Just trying to be helpful anonymous Pi dude since you asked.  But I am not about to argue with you.

loki13

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Re: taft law school
« Reply #95 on: August 14, 2015, 07:21:54 AM »
LP,

I have no reasons to doubt  your post- after all, on the internet, no one knows you're a dog! That said, one thing did catch my eye-

"Within six months I was getting PD conflict and family law cases on a regular basis because I let every attorney in town know I would gladly take any cases they wanted to get rid of. "

cf.

"First full year out in solo practice I netted six figures."

I have some great deal of difficulty reconciling these two statements based on what I know. First, even had you said that you grossed six figures, I would find that remarkable and difficult to believe. But you wrote that you netted six figures (that is to say, after expenses, filing fees, staff - if any-, phone service, rent, what have you).

Family law and conflict PD cases earn almost no money. Now, I can believe that the rates were a little more beneficial before the state cutbacks of the last recession, but that time period was: a) also a recession, and b) before the most recent expansion in attorney salaries. And to *net* six figures, in your first year, doing discarded (not desirable) family law cases and conflict PD cases.... I don't know what to say. I can't say that it's impossible, but I know a lot of family law practitioners, and people that try to make it starting out, and they work hard- and I've never known any of them to have that success in their first year.

If you're not misremembering, you should really post about how you did it in more detail, because I'm sure there's a lot of people that would love to know about it.

Re: taft law school
« Reply #96 on: August 14, 2015, 08:43:35 AM »
EZ - one man office, cut the overhead, no employees, work 16 hours every day,  never take a vacation,  take every case that walks in the door and try to charge $350 an hour, back then PD conflict was $75 and hour.  SSD and SSI cases also pay big multiples on not so many hours. Never did much PI because too time consuming and too much competition.  20 years ago and no cell phones or email to waste time.  You could do it now too, you just need a flow of clients and a referral network and a plan.  I located my office between the two biggest bars in a one horse town that way the clients could have a drink before and after they met with me.  After I ended up getting killed on taxes, I worked a lot smarter and a lot less. 

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Re: taft law school
« Reply #97 on: August 14, 2015, 09:01:20 AM »
LP-

I have to quibble with a few things. I find it exceptionally hard to believe that a person, straight from Taft Law School and in their first year of practice, was commanding $350/hr in 1992. Perhaps you ... mischarged a client or two. But practitioners in fields quite a bit more lucrative than family law and with 10 years experience get fee reversals for charging $300 an hour.

SSD and SSI cases are time consuming and not very lucrative- they require high volume and take time. I find it relatively difficult to believe that you were seeing quick returns on those in your first year. Moreover, the 9th Cir., even then, was using the lodestar for these claims, and $150/hr for a seasoned practitioner would be a good recovery. See Starr v. Bowen (noting that contingent fee arrangement amounting to $150/hr was acceptable).

I understand that you hustled. I know many people that have hustled and eventually built up a successful practice. I have known precisely no people that have netted six figures in their first year of solo practice in the manner you described.

Re: taft law school
« Reply #98 on: August 14, 2015, 09:01:55 AM »
SSI fee agreements were the lesser of $4000 or 25% past due benefits. You must've had a lot of successful cases with back pay in your first year. How did you become competent in the area?

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Re: taft law school
« Reply #99 on: August 14, 2015, 09:14:55 AM »
"and try to charge $350 an hour,"

As an FYI, there is also the Laffey Matrix.
In 2006-07, an attorney with 1-3 years of experience should command $151/hour in Sacramento, $209/hour in Los Angeles (useful as a benchmark for lodestar calculation in Federal litigation).

I don't feel like doing the math, but- the same attorney would earn $205/hour in DC (equivalent to LA). In 94-95, an attorney with equivalent experience would expect $151 in DC.

I am finding it difficult to reconcile what I know with some of your statements.