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Author Topic: Forging Letters of Recommendation a crime?  (Read 3564 times)

realstreetrat

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Forging Letters of Recommendation a crime?
« on: March 26, 2009, 05:47:16 PM »
Is forging Letters of Recommendation a crime once a person has entered a program?

This doesn't seem to fit the, 'False Academic Credentials' since it is not forging a degree, certificate, etc.

Thoughts?

'blueskies

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Re: Forging Letters of Recommendation a crime?
« Reply #1 on: March 26, 2009, 05:48:40 PM »
It's certainly unethical
awkward follows you like a beer chasing a shot of tequila.

just Trev

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Re: Forging Letters of Recommendation a crime?
« Reply #2 on: March 26, 2009, 05:57:27 PM »
ethical schmethical...

that's what i always say.

realstreetrat

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Re: Forging Letters of Recommendation a crime?
« Reply #3 on: March 26, 2009, 06:04:51 PM »
Sounds unethical, but how about unlawful?

Since it is not a transcript, degree completion, etc -- it seems to not fit into the 'False Academic Credential' realm.

Thoughts?

rekopter

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Re: Forging Letters of Recommendation a crime?
« Reply #4 on: March 26, 2009, 06:31:46 PM »
I wouldn't do it. It's probably not a crime but that doesn't mean that a bar  wouldn't seriously frown on it.

heartbreaker

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Re: Forging Letters of Recommendation a crime?
« Reply #5 on: March 26, 2009, 07:21:20 PM »
Quote
The Law School Admission Council has established procedures for dealing with instances of possible candidate misconduct or irregularities on the LSAT or in the law school admission process. Misconduct or irregularity in the admission process is a serious offense with serious consequences. Intent is not an element of a finding of misconduct or irregularity. Misconduct or irregularity is defined as the submission, as part of the law school admission process, including, but not limited to, regular, transfer, and visiting applications, of any information that is false, inconsistent, or misleading, or the omission of information that may result in a false or misleading conclusion, or the violation of any regulation governing the law school admission process, including any violation of LSAT test center regulations.

Examples of misconduct and irregularities include, but are not limited to, submission of an altered or a nonauthentic transcript; submission of an application containing false, inconsistent, or misleading information; submission of an altered, nonauthentic, or unauthorized letter of recommendation; falsification of records; impersonation of another in taking the LSAT; switching of LSAT answer sheets with another; taking the LSAT for purposes other than applying to law school; copying on, or other forms of cheating on, the LSAT; obtaining advance access to test materials; theft of test materials; working, marking, erasing, reading, or turning pages on sections of the LSAT during unauthorized times; submission of false, inconsistent, or misleading information to the Law School Data Assembly Service (LSDAS); submissions of false, inconsistent, or misleading statements or omissions of information requested on the LSAT & LSDAS Registration Form or on individual law school application forms; falsification of transcript information, school attendance, honors, awards, or employment; or providing false, inconsistent, or misleading information in the financial aid/scholarship application process. A charge of misconduct or irregularity may be made prior to a candidateís admission to law school, after matriculation at a law school, or after admission to practice.

When alleged misconduct or irregularity brings into question the validity of LSAC data about a candidate, the school may be notified of possible data error, and transmission of LSAT scores and LSDAS reports will be withheld until the matter has been resolved by the Law School Admission Councilís Misconduct and Irregularities in the Admission Process Subcommittee. The Council will investigate all instances of alleged misconduct or irregularities in the admission process in accordance with the LSAC Rules Governing Misconduct and Irregularities in the Admission Process.

A subcommittee representative will determine whether misconduct or an irregularity has occurred. If the subcommittee representative determines that a preponderance of the evidence shows misconduct or irregularity, then a report of the determination is sent to all law schools to which the individual has applied, subsequently applies, or has matriculated. Notation that a misconduct or irregularity report is on file is also included on LSAT & LSDAS Law School Reports. Such reports are retained indefinitely. In appropriate cases, state and national bar authorities and other affected persons and institutions may also receive notification. Individual law schools and bar authorities determine what action, if any, they will take in response to a finding of misconduct or irregularity. Such action may include the closing of an admission file, revocation of an offer of admission, dismissal from law school through a schoolís internal disciplinary channels, or disbarment. Thus, a finding of misconduct or irregularity is a very serious matter. More information regarding misconduct and irregularity procedures may be obtained by writing to:

heartbreaker

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Re: Forging Letters of Recommendation a crime?
« Reply #6 on: March 26, 2009, 07:23:07 PM »
In other words, it may not be a "crime" (as in, you probably will not face legal penalties or jail time) but if you think dismissal from school or disbarment is somehow worse than having to pay a fine...best of luck to you.

realstreetrat

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Re: Forging Letters of Recommendation a crime?
« Reply #7 on: March 26, 2009, 07:25:13 PM »
If dismissed for falsifying Letters of Recommendation, and having accepted finaid -- would criminal action follow?

heartbreaker

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Re: Forging Letters of Recommendation a crime?
« Reply #8 on: March 26, 2009, 07:27:21 PM »
If dismissed for falsifying Letters of Recommendation, and having accepted finaid -- would criminal action follow?

Depends on the school's internal policy.

What is your preoccupation with "criminal action" all about?

If you are dismissed from law school for a misconduct violation, your chances for admission to the bar are all but shot.

Matthies

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Re: Forging Letters of Recommendation a crime?
« Reply #9 on: March 26, 2009, 08:02:30 PM »
Figure out what state your school is located in

Look up said states criminal code online

Find Forgery

Read statute

Interpret

Decide if you need a lawyer

Forge check to pay lawyer
*In clinical studies, Matthies was well tolerated, but women who are pregnant, nursing or might become pregnant should not take or handle Matthies due to a rare, but serious side effect called him having to make child support payments.