Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
;

Author Topic: networking  (Read 623 times)

cconnoll

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 48
    • AOL Instant Messenger - tgrdbsktprep31
    • View Profile
    • Email
networking
« on: March 19, 2009, 05:16:06 PM »
Im a newbie to this, but here goes:

I am moving to San Diego in August to attend Cal Western. I know that outside of my schools rank, my ability to network is imperative.

any advice any 1L's, 2L's or 3L's can give on the best routes to network @ school, in the city, at events etc......on the assumption that the person is pretty unfamiliar with the school, city etc. (im moving from UofO in eugene to Cal Western in San Diego)


thanks a ton

 8)

beaverfuzz

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 88
    • View Profile
Re: networking
« Reply #1 on: March 20, 2009, 10:17:35 PM »
Join the California bar association if it has a student membership. Even if it doesn't, contact the practice section(s) in which you are interested and ask for information on their upcoming continuing legal education sessions. Often you can attend these events for practically nothing (if not entirely free) and mingle with practicing attorneys.

I have also had luck searching for alumni from my undergrad and law school and asking them for an informational interview. Many are very willing to help.

Good luck.

linquest

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 999
    • View Profile
Re: networking
« Reply #2 on: March 28, 2009, 12:10:45 AM »
Don't be afraid to approach attorneys at events, that's simply the biggest hurdle!  Keep tabs on alumni events at your school.  That's the easiest way to meet attorneys, especially those willing to mentor you and help you get a job.  They have a vested interested in seeing that students from their school do well on the job market--it enhances the school's reputation as well as theirs.  Be active in student orgs, though you don't necessarily need to be in a leadership role.  Inviting attorneys to speak at events on campus is a good way to network.

If you go to events like the CLEs beaverfuzz suggested, you can approach the speakers and thank them for their presentation before casually "interviewing" them.  You might research the speakers a bit beforehand so you can ask good questions.  Same with conferences--if you can get an attendance list beforehand, see if anyone's coming from organizations that you're interested in working for and keep an eye out for namebadges.  Of course, don't get stalkerish or get into interrogation mode, LOL
Fed gov't atty