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Author Topic: How difficult can it really be... seriously?  (Read 15687 times)

k0em9u

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Re: How difficult can it really be... seriously?
« Reply #30 on: April 03, 2009, 04:45:11 PM »
Is Law School harder than college? Yes.

Is Law School the hardest thing you'll ever do in your life? @#!* no.

This is just a result of how ridiculously bad undergrad studies are in this country, sorry. Law school is no harder than you'd expect a professional school to be. Yes, it's going to be a full time occupation 5 days a week, 7 days a week when LRW *&^% is due.

For anyone that has ever done anything other than high school and college, (i.e. had a career) there is no reason to be frightened by law school. I went through 1L with both a family and a social life, I still had time to go party, go catch some NBA and MLB games (football is *&^% anyway), I traveled away for several weekends. In short, I maintained a completely normal life while doing very well in 1L. There is no reason to worry and no reason to freak out.

There were certain people in my class that spent essentially every waking hour studying, but come end of semester none of them did better than those of us who approached it in a more, well, sane approach.

One note to keep in mind though; your professors are going to tell you time after time not to spend your money on supplements/commercial outlines. They are f-ing with your heads. As far as I am considered the supplements are more important than the case books. Hell, you can look up the cases on Lexis/Westlaw/Wikipedia. The supplements will teach you what actually matters.

It's a full time study. No more. No less.

Sue me female dog, I know a lawyer.

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Re: How difficult can it really be... seriously?
« Reply #31 on: April 03, 2009, 04:58:44 PM »
Good post.

Two lessons:

1. Ignore everything your professor says about studying and grades.  They're professors.  They don't know *&^% about what it's like to be in the trenches, worrying about a real job.

2. Learn how to write a good exam.  This is the be all, end all of law school.  Law school = exam.  Exam = law school.  Nothing else matters.

k0em9u

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Re: How difficult can it really be... seriously?
« Reply #32 on: April 03, 2009, 11:16:49 PM »
Sadly, that needs confirmation. The one thing that shocked me in law school was the bull they are feeding you. And I'm not talking about inflated employment statistics, just... the whole package.

Get LEEWS (www.leews.com). It will help you miles when it comes to exam taking. Your professor will tell you not to obsess about black letter law. This is bull. And this is also where supplements really come in helpful. For every single page you read, think about how this is relevant to your exam not how it will help you get questions right in class. Even if your professor is Kingsfield redux, the exam is what is important. And while I only have experience from 1 law school I have to say, the Socratic method doesn't seem to be what it used to be. I haven't had any professors that go out of their way to be a male private part to anyone.

One thing you should take for granted though; if you have to pass when a professor calls on you, you better be damn well prepared next class. But I'm gonna assume that to be common sense.

Oh, yeah, most important thing about law school. It's perfectly fine to get drunk on Thursdays.
Sue me female dog, I know a lawyer.

contrarian

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Re: How difficult can it really be... seriously?
« Reply #33 on: April 08, 2009, 06:46:16 PM »

And I am well spoken, and generally no one in my school would suspect that this is my position in the class. I got a C- in a 5 credit property class 1L year (the prof said "I probably would have given you a B if I had graded this early, but it must have been one of the last exams I looked at.").  My confidence was shaken by being in the middle of the class (literally a B average) after the first semester, so my grades kept falling. 


If that was indeed written on your exam, then you should argue that you do indeed deserve the B.  This is basically the professor stating that people may have, and probably were, given better grades and you given a worse one for the wholly arbitrary fact of in what order the exams were graded.  Such an admission makes not only your grade suspect, but calls into question the fairness that the professor gives to each and everyone of the papers he grades. 

bl825

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Re: How difficult can it really be... seriously?
« Reply #34 on: April 13, 2009, 07:15:22 PM »
Shut up, LawDog.

Why couldn't you write a law school exam, Alfalfa?  Nervousness?  Inability to spot issues?  I don't entirely believe you.

I am going to have so much fun creaming you arroggant phonies. Just like I did in undergrad...you are next.

See you in class or Moot Court.  ;)

This is funny because every time I see one of LawDog's posts my thoughts are, word for word: "What an arrogant phony!"

;)
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lawness

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Re: How difficult can it really be... seriously?
« Reply #35 on: April 15, 2009, 09:17:31 AM »
Sadly, that needs confirmation. The one thing that shocked me in law school was the bull they are feeding you. And I'm not talking about inflated employment statistics, just... the whole package.

Get LEEWS (www.leews.com). It will help you miles when it comes to exam taking. Your professor will tell you not to obsess about black letter law. This is bull. And this is also where supplements really come in helpful. For every single page you read, think about how this is relevant to your exam not how it will help you get questions right in class. Even if your professor is Kingsfield redux, the exam is what is important. And while I only have experience from 1 law school I have to say, the Socratic method doesn't seem to be what it used to be. I haven't had any professors that go out of their way to be a male private part to anyone.

One thing you should take for granted though; if you have to pass when a professor calls on you, you better be damn well prepared next class. But I'm gonna assume that to be common sense.

Oh, yeah, most important thing about law school. It's perfectly fine to get drunk on Thursdays.

Can anyone seriously attest to LEEWS? I am contemplating using this.

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Re: How difficult can it really be... seriously?
« Reply #36 on: April 15, 2009, 01:19:34 PM »
No. 

Listen, guys: you either have it or you don't.  I'm sorry to break it to you, but law school exam-taking is about formulating quick arguments and seeing things quickly and more clearly than your peers.  No amount of study will change your grades, beyond the minimum required to vaguely understand the BLL.

And this is coming from someone who partially bought all this bull about GTM last year.

Matthies

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Re: How difficult can it really be... seriously?
« Reply #37 on: April 15, 2009, 02:17:18 PM »
No. 

Listen, guys: you either have it or you don't.  I'm sorry to break it to you, but law school exam-taking is about formulating quick arguments and seeing things quickly and more clearly than your peers.  No amount of study will change your grades, beyond the minimum required to vaguely understand the BLL.

And this is coming from someone who partially bought all this bull about GTM last year.

Wally one thing that might help you to “get it” is go back to reading the cases, I think you said you stopped doing that. The reasoning in them is there to teach you the thinking part that can’t be learned by reading supplements or how to books. You just get it by seeing it over and over so many times its changes the way you “think” about things. Once you got that part you can skip reading them, but I dare say they are more valuable than knowing the BLL by heart just for how they reason out the answer to the problem at hand. Its that reasoning by doing, in this case reading, that teaches your reason on the tests. Like the case method or hate it, it does work for teaching through osmosis the thinking like a lawyer part, as long as you understand that’s the point to reading them in the first place, you can look up and get a clearer BL rule elsewhere, they are there to teach you the WHY not the WHAT.
*In clinical studies, Matthies was well tolerated, but women who are pregnant, nursing or might become pregnant should not take or handle Matthies due to a rare, but serious side effect called him having to make child support payments.

,.,.,.;.,.,.

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Re: How difficult can it really be... seriously?
« Reply #38 on: April 15, 2009, 02:25:21 PM »
Eh.  There are only a few tropes that come up again and again, like the intent behind a statute, or how the law might apply to the facts.

Case method is pretty much useless, IMO.

mbw

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Re: How difficult can it really be... seriously?
« Reply #39 on: April 15, 2009, 03:34:20 PM »
No. 

Listen, guys: you either have it or you don't.  I'm sorry to break it to you, but law school exam-taking is about formulating quick arguments and seeing things quickly and more clearly than your peers.  No amount of study will change your grades, beyond the minimum required to vaguely understand the BLL.

And this is coming from someone who partially bought all this bull about GTM last year.

Sigh.

Wally, it really is unfortunate that law school has been such a disappointment to you, but I think you shouldn't generalize your own experience to everyone's.  There are some people to "have it", some who are able to learn it, and, well, some who may not be able to learn it, for whatever reason.  Just because you may not be in the second category doesn't mean it doesn't exist.
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