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Author Topic: Thomas M. Cooley Vs. Nova Southeastern AAMPLE program  (Read 15461 times)

Ninja1

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Re: Thomas M. Cooley Vs. Nova Southeastern AAMPLE program
« Reply #10 on: March 01, 2009, 04:35:39 AM »
AAMPLE if not retake the LSAT.
I'mma stay bumpin' till I bump my head on my tomb.

cannotpick

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Re: Thomas M. Cooley Vs. Nova Southeastern AAMPLE program
« Reply #11 on: March 01, 2009, 09:26:57 AM »
What section is difficult for you to understand? I am simply asking for knowledge (from past experiences) pertaining to this type of decision. So you think I shouldn't attend law school for reasons to you not being able to understand my post? Or because of my choices?  I appreciate your comments.
I think it is important to be honest and frank because too many people hastily make the choice to go to law school. So, please don't take my comments as mean. Here's why I don't think you should go to law school: (1) these are not good schools (so bad that you aren't even guaranteed a legal job after graduating; (2) you are paying full tuition or close to it; (3) your writing ability is sub-par (your post with filled with incorrectly used cliches); and (4) there's no reason to believe you will do well once you are there because your GPA and LSAT are both low.

I just don't think this is a wise investment. I'm sure you have plenty of other talents and suggest that you pursue those rather than entering an already bloated legal market.
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azlaw09

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Re: Thomas M. Cooley Vs. Nova Southeastern AAMPLE program
« Reply #12 on: March 01, 2009, 10:49:50 AM »
^^^Good Avice. Cooley has a brutal curve and forces out  1/3 or so of the first year class. Chances are high that you might blow a year of tuition and get the boot at the end of 1l. Further, a Cooley JD will get you nothing but the ability to sit for the bar and start a solo. If starting a solo is your goal, then go for it. 

These "AMMPLE" programs sound like scams to make money for the schools. I would probably take it over Cooley though. This costs 3k ( I think  that's what you said) to have roughly a 1/2 chance of making it. A year of Cooley tuition to have a 2/3 or so chance of surviving is probably much costlier.

Your best bet is really to study your ass off for the LSAT and retake. Breaking 150 will probably give you some much better options.


randyers09

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Re: Thomas M. Cooley Vs. Nova Southeastern AAMPLE program
« Reply #13 on: March 01, 2009, 11:15:37 AM »
OP,


Don't listen to all of these haters. If you want to go to law school, do it! I live about an hour from Lansing and Cooley. If you intend to stay in Michigan after graduating from Cooley it will not be as impossible as the rest of the posters here make it sound to get a job. I interned at the Prosecutor's office in my county. EVERY single attorney in that office was a Cooley graduate. The Chief Assistant Prosecutor, who is only 9 years out of Cooley, just got hired in the United States District Attorney's office. If you plan on doing this kind of work you will be fine. Cooley graduates overwhelm public service jobs. Many private attorneys are also Cooley graduates. I am not sure what your prosepects would be upon leaving Michigan....

As for the AAMPLE program, I do not know *&^% about that, so I am not going to comment on something that I don't know.

Weigh your options carefully, I like Lansing and often go there to visit. I have visited Cooley's campus, Applied, got accepted, but decided not to go there because I want to leave Michigan. If you have any questions feel free to send me a message and I will help you out. Whatever you decide I wish you the best of luck.

SASS

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Re: Thomas M. Cooley Vs. Nova Southeastern AAMPLE program
« Reply #14 on: March 01, 2009, 11:41:36 AM »
Please, please have no false expectations wherever you decide to go. The reality is you will have limited opportunities coming out of Cooley. You may have some public service positions to you (note, not all some are very competitive). You have to consider, 1) you are stuck in Michigan for a long time and 2) you have some serious restrictions on jobs. That is simply the truth.

If you want to be in Florida, at least try to go to a FL school. I would still try to figure out how to avoid any T4. I speak from experience. I attended at T4 and was lucky enough to transfer to a T20 so I know from experience the quality of educations and the job prospects cannot be compared. It's like apples and oranges.

latinlord

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Re: Thomas M. Cooley Vs. Nova Southeastern AAMPLE program
« Reply #15 on: March 01, 2009, 11:55:28 AM »
Hey!! I feel your pain trust me! My numbers were bad 3 years ago (check out my old school lsn profile)
  I got into both program.. U can do both, sign up for cooley, and do the ammple program, if you don't get into ammple, you start cooley...
   Other schools you apply to are on my list from my lsn profile, you should apply to all the ones I got into. Do not give up! Cooley can open the doors to a law degree the rest of up to you once you enter those doors.
   I interviewed with an attorney who went to cooley, he now makes close to a million a year and has a very sucessful personal injury firm.
   Also cooley has like 40 people transfer out... You can be one of those 40 to tranfer to alocation that is better for you. I moved to Indiana for two years! I am not a midwesterner! This year I got published by a law review, and  I am now visiting Villanova for my last year and starting this May (1 week after I graduate from my J.D program) i'm getting my LL.M in trial advocacy at Temple Law... You can do it! I did it! You just have to fight! I wish you the best.. Don't let the haters on here get you down!
   GO FOR IT!!! hit me up if you got questions! good luck!
Graduated from Indiana Law - Indianapolis!!
Was a 3rd year Visiting Student at Villanova University School of Law.
Graduated from Temple University Beasley School of Law - LL.M in Trial Advocacy Candidate 2010
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nealric

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Re: Thomas M. Cooley Vs. Nova Southeastern AAMPLE program
« Reply #16 on: March 01, 2009, 12:50:05 PM »
Quote

Don't listen to all of these haters. If you want to go to law school, do it! I live about an hour from Lansing and Cooley. If you intend to stay in Michigan after graduating from Cooley it will not be as impossible as the rest of the posters here make it sound to get a job. I interned at the Prosecutor's office in my county. EVERY single attorney in that office was a Cooley graduate. The Chief Assistant Prosecutor, who is only 9 years out of Cooley, just got hired in the United States District Attorney's office. If you plan on doing this kind of work you will be fine. Cooley graduates overwhelm public service jobs. Many private attorneys are also Cooley graduates. I am not sure what your prosepects would be upon leaving Michigan....

There is a difference between being a hater and encouraging a sober evaluations of the OP's options. I think most of the posts here have been the latter.

Cooley is a gigantic law school. Sheer numbers dictate there will be a large number of Cooley grads practicing in the region. However, that does NOT change the fact that a majority of those who matriculate at Cooley never become practicing attorneys. As long as the OP is aware of the risk, and chooses to take it, that's not a problem. Cooley gave him/her a chance. But the success of certain specific graduates is a terrible way to evaluate the school.

I'm sure there are people who graduated from Harvard Law who are homeless alcoholics. Does that mean one should avoid Harvard because people who graduate from there become homeless alcoholics? Likewise, the fact that a Cooley grad became an AUSA does not mean one should go to Cooley and expect similar success.
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Matthies

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Re: Thomas M. Cooley Vs. Nova Southeastern AAMPLE program
« Reply #17 on: March 01, 2009, 02:03:41 PM »
What section is difficult for you to understand? I am simply asking for knowledge (from past experiences) pertaining to this type of decision. So you think I shouldn't attend law school for reasons to you not being able to understand my post? Or because of my choices?  I appreciate your comments.
I think it is important to be honest and frank because too many people hastily make the choice to go to law school. So, please don't take my comments as mean. Here's why I don't think you should go to law school: (1) these are not good schools (so bad that you aren't even guaranteed a legal job after graduating; (2) you are paying full tuition or close to it; (3) your writing ability is sub-par (your post with filled with incorrectly used cliches); and (4) there's no reason to believe you will do well once you are there because your GPA and LSAT are both low.

I just don't think this is a wise investment. I'm sure you have plenty of other talents and suggest that you pursue those rather than entering an already bloated legal market.

Sigh. I disagree with both idea and comments in this thread. There are two types of law students that do well, those that work very hard to do so, and those that work very hard to get into schools that make it easier for them to do well. The latter far outnumber the former, but there are former success stories. Only the OP knows what type of person he/she is, a fighter or a roll over and play dead (i.e. see students side of board: ďIím at top 20 had five bids OCI and did not get a job shoot self?Ē). Iím not saying the odds will not be against the OP, they certainly are. But there have been against many of us, yet two of us, myself and latinlord over came both to be successful. That has nothing to do with the school, it has to do with whatís inside the OP. And only the OP knows if they are enough of a fighter to beat the odds, most people arenít, but a few are. And for those few I say go where you can and make the best of it.

I fit all the things you say make a bad LS candidate. (1) I donít go to a good school, (2) I paid full tuition (and worked to offset that while going to LS), (3) I am a horrible writer, I have sever dyslexia, did not learn to read or write my own name till I was 10 years old, yet Iíve been published in law reviews several times, as well as local bar publications (4) I had horrible numbers, 150/2.9. So bad that I had to convince a school to let me try law classes before the JD, so I started an LLM/MLS and took advanced law classes against 2 and 3Ls under the same testing conditions without having the first year of law school, and I smoked them, getting a 3.65 GPA in 24 credits and taking highest grade in the class twice. That got me into the JD program, where Iím now ranked 13th in my class and have several job offerings for when I graduate in May with the JD and the LLM/MLS.
 
I would have been successful if I went to Cooley, or if I went to Yale, because, just like LatianLord, I was never going to roll over and play dead. Granted, people like me and LL are few and far between, but they are out there, and I will always encourage them to go for it, IF THEY ARE THAT TYPE, because if they listen to the common wisdom, mostly from the roll over type, they will never succeed. So the question is, OP are you willing to work that hard, to never give up, to pick yourself up off the ground, to have people say you canít make it but prove them wrong? If you can answer yes, honestly, to all those questions, then go for it. If you canít, then donít. Thr roll over type will get killed at schools like those. Either give up on law school or keep re-taking the LAST until you can get into a law school that will do more for you than you can do for yourself.

*In clinical studies, Matthies was well tolerated, but women who are pregnant, nursing or might become pregnant should not take or handle Matthies due to a rare, but serious side effect called him having to make child support payments.

randyers09

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Re: Thomas M. Cooley Vs. Nova Southeastern AAMPLE program
« Reply #18 on: March 01, 2009, 02:12:03 PM »
What section is difficult for you to understand? I am simply asking for knowledge (from past experiences) pertaining to this type of decision. So you think I shouldn't attend law school for reasons to you not being able to understand my post? Or because of my choices?  I appreciate your comments.
I think it is important to be honest and frank because too many people hastily make the choice to go to law school. So, please don't take my comments as mean. Here's why I don't think you should go to law school: (1) these are not good schools (so bad that you aren't even guaranteed a legal job after graduating; (2) you are paying full tuition or close to it; (3) your writing ability is sub-par (your post with filled with incorrectly used cliches); and (4) there's no reason to believe you will do well once you are there because your GPA and LSAT are both low.

I just don't think this is a wise investment. I'm sure you have plenty of other talents and suggest that you pursue those rather than entering an already bloated legal market.

Sigh. I disagree with both idea and comments in this thread. There are two types of law students that do well, those that work very hard to do so, and those that work very hard to get into schools that make it easier for them to do well. The latter far outnumber the former, but there are former success stories. Only the OP knows what type of person he/she is, a fighter or a roll over and play dead (i.e. see students side of board: ďIím at top 20 had five bids OCI and did not get a job shoot self?Ē). Iím not saying the odds will not be against the OP, they certainly are. But there have been against many of us, yet two of us, myself and latinlord over came both to be successful. That has nothing to do with the school, it has to do with whatís inside the OP. And only the OP knows if they are enough of a fighter to beat the odds, most people arenít, but a few are. And for those few I say go where you can and make the best of it.

I fit all the things you say make a bad LS candidate. (1) I donít go to a good school, (2) I paid full tuition (and worked to offset that while going to LS), (3) I am a horrible writer, I have sever dyslexia, did not learn to read or write my own name till I was 10 years old, yet Iíve been published in law reviews several times, as well as local bar publications (4) I had horrible numbers, 150/2.9. So bad that I had to convince a school to let me try law classes before the JD, so I started an LLM/MLS and took advanced law classes against 2 and 3Ls under the same testing conditions without having the first year of law school, and I smoked them, getting a 3.65 GPA in 24 credits and taking highest grade in the class twice. That got me into the JD program, where Iím now ranked 13th in my class and have several job offerings for when I graduate in May with the JD and the LLM/MLS.
 
I would have been successful if I went to Cooley, or if I went to Yale, because, just like LatianLord, I was never going to roll over and play dead. Granted, people like me and LL are few and far between, but they are out there, and I will always encourage them to go for it, IF THEY ARE THAT TYPE, because if they listen to the common wisdom, mostly from the roll over type, they will never succeed. So the question is, OP are you willing to work that hard, to never give up, to pick yourself up off the ground, to have people say you canít make it but prove them wrong? If you can answer yes, honestly, to all those questions, then go for it. If you canít, then donít. Thr roll over type will get killed at schools like those. Either give up on law school or keep re-taking the LAST until you can get into a law school that will do more for you than you can do for yourself.





great advice.... just curious what school do you go to? I have the same exact numbers.

Matthies

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Re: Thomas M. Cooley Vs. Nova Southeastern AAMPLE program
« Reply #19 on: March 01, 2009, 02:17:17 PM »
Denver, part-time.
*In clinical studies, Matthies was well tolerated, but women who are pregnant, nursing or might become pregnant should not take or handle Matthies due to a rare, but serious side effect called him having to make child support payments.