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Author Topic: Real-estate law  (Read 493 times)

contrarian

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Real-estate law
« on: February 26, 2009, 11:12:42 PM »
Present economic conditions aside...

I'm looking at the schools that I'm closely considering, and notice that they offer only a few courses in real-estate law when the entire field seems rich for course content.  Real-estate transactions, litigation, zoning, environmental, issues with common-ownership owned real-estate (condo's and townhouse associations), leasing, etc. 

One of the schools I'm considering (JMLS) is one of two in the country that have specialized programs for real-estate.  While looking at the breadth of courses available at the three other Chicago part-time schools their real-estate focused courses seems rather sparse. 

Your thoughts?

argo

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Re: Real-estate law
« Reply #1 on: February 28, 2009, 08:45:55 PM »
Present economic conditions aside...

I'm looking at the schools that I'm closely considering, and notice that they offer only a few courses in real-estate law when the entire field seems rich for course content.  Real-estate transactions, litigation, zoning, environmental, issues with common-ownership owned real-estate (condo's and townhouse associations), leasing, etc. 

One of the schools I'm considering (JMLS) is one of two in the country that have specialized programs for real-estate.  While looking at the breadth of courses available at the three other Chicago part-time schools their real-estate focused courses seems rather sparse. 

Your thoughts?

I doubt you'll have any trouble doing real estate-related work no matter what level school you attend or at what level firm you practice.  Real estate is about the most ubiquitous (and least intellectually challenging) of all the fields.  Trust me, I worked in RE finance.
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iahurricane

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Re: Real-estate law
« Reply #2 on: February 28, 2009, 11:10:28 PM »
Present economic conditions aside...

I'm looking at the schools that I'm closely considering, and notice that they offer only a few courses in real-estate law when the entire field seems rich for course content.  Real-estate transactions, litigation, zoning, environmental, issues with common-ownership owned real-estate (condo's and townhouse associations), leasing, etc. 

One of the schools I'm considering (JMLS) is one of two in the country that have specialized programs for real-estate.  While looking at the breadth of courses available at the three other Chicago part-time schools their real-estate focused courses seems rather sparse. 

Your thoughts?

I doubt you'll have any trouble doing real estate-related work no matter what level school you attend or at what level firm you practice.  Real estate is about the most ubiquitous (and least intellectually challenging) of all the fields.  Trust me, I worked in RE finance.

Hey Argo when you said you worked in RE finance do you mean as an attorney or before you went to law school? I have a lot of questions if you worked as a real estate attorney, as that is what I want to do after law school.

argo

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Re: Real-estate law
« Reply #3 on: March 01, 2009, 12:56:49 AM »
Not as an attorney - as an analyst after undergrad.  I worked with many RE attorneys, though.  So, feel free to PM maybe I'll be of some help.
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"And that is what is so great about the Internet. It enables pompous blowhards to connect with other pompous blowhards in a vast circle-jerk of pomposity."

-Bill Maher