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Author Topic: December 2009 LSAT hopeful with some questions  (Read 5229 times)

SDD

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December 2009 LSAT hopeful with some questions
« on: February 20, 2009, 09:56:22 AM »
I'm hoping to take the December '09 LSAT, and I've got a couple questions.  I recently grazed over the thread where chucky (I believe?) went from a 147 score to 169, and I'm hoping to do the same thing.  I scored a 149 my first time taking a practice test, with no prior knowledge of what to expect on the test.  I'd like to get into the high 160's with hopes of a top 25 school.  Is it best to take the prep course first, and then begin studying the bibles?  Or will it not matter?  I graduate in May and can have the money saved up for the prep course by summer, but as of right now money's tight and I only have the bibles and about 20 prep tests.  Also am I at a disadvantage taking the December test over the September when it comes to Law School application timing?  Meaning, is the earlier I apply the better?

Once I graduate I also have a predicament.  I'm currently looking into paralegal jobs, but I'm afraid that the hours they require might interfere too much with my LSAT studying, so would it be best for me to just work a part-time job as a waiter/bartender, allowing me the most possible study time? 

I need the highest possible LSAT score.  My GPA is sort of screwed (cumulative~3.3).  There is an upward trend, I just had 3 or 4 crappy semesters when an immediate family member passed away.  Any help is greatly appreciated.  I want to start dominating this test ASAP!!  Thanks everyone.

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Re: December 2009 LSAT hopeful with some questions
« Reply #1 on: February 20, 2009, 10:50:26 PM »
Definitely take a class or hire a tutor, and do it as early in your prep as possible.  Lots of people will give you anecdotes about how they self prepped and did really well.  I self prepped and did better than many of them, and I can tell you beyond a shadow of a doubt that I would have done better had I hired a good tutor.  As an instructor I got better results from students who were blank slates.  Self-prep makes it very easy to form bad habits and wrong ideas about the test, and bad habits die hard.  Books are useful, but they can't look at what you're doing and give you feedback.

Paralegal work won't help your admissions chances and may hurt them (because so many other applicants come from paralegal backgrounds it's hard to stand out).

ohioan

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Re: December 2009 LSAT hopeful with some questions
« Reply #2 on: February 21, 2009, 04:03:39 PM »
As I have learned in this admissions cycle, nothing is more important than your LSAT score. Next would be GPA. You need to score as high as possible on the LSAT and an LSAT prep course is necessary. I could not afford one, but managed to raise my score from 144 to 161 by studying and analyzing my practice tests. Send me a message if you are interested in learning more about my study materials and strategy. Definitely exhaust your independent study first. THen take the prep course. If you figure out your strengths and what does or does not work for you, then you can use the resources of the prep course to fine tune your weak area. Best of luck.

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Re: December 2009 LSAT hopeful with some questions
« Reply #3 on: February 21, 2009, 05:15:16 PM »
Definitely exhaust your independent study first. THen take the prep course.

This is like telling someone to spend a few months at the driving range and THEN hire a golf instructor.  Completely backwards. 

A prep-course is going to give you the basics.  It should come first.  Master the basics, get that strong foundation built, and then fine-tune it all with self-study until test day.

ohioan

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Re: December 2009 LSAT hopeful with some questions
« Reply #4 on: February 21, 2009, 08:49:32 PM »
Definitely exhaust your independent study first. THen take the prep course.

This is like telling someone to spend a few months at the driving range and THEN hire a golf instructor.  Completely backwards. 

A prep-course is going to give you the basics.  It should come first.  Master the basics, get that strong foundation built, and then fine-tune it all with self-study until test day.

I disagree, and I spoke from experience. Study on your own first to learn your strengths/weaknesses, then try to improve as much as you can. say you improve from 149 to 157. If you are consistently scoring 157, then you know that your prepcourse should improve above that. If you take the prep course first and improve to 157, you would not have gained as much. This comes from experinece, but hey, do what you want. Golf analogy to LSAT? And if you expect a prepcourse to give you basics, you underestimate its purpose and value. For $1200+ it is supposed to help you improve your weaknesses and maintain your strengths, at least that is what the CAF does. Think about it. If you have not improved your strengths and minimized your weaknesses as much as you could, then you will ultimately not get as much out of it as you could, hence you will not score as high as you could on the lsat. I have a 2.83 GPA and I am going to a great law school. 'nuff said. Cheers, and good luck. :D

Mitchell

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Re: December 2009 LSAT hopeful with some questions
« Reply #5 on: February 21, 2009, 09:42:22 PM »
I have a 2.83 GPA and I am going to a great law school. 'nuff said.

Great law school with a 2.83 and a 161 means you're either black, Mexican, or lying.
Mmmmmmmitchell

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Re: December 2009 LSAT hopeful with some questions
« Reply #6 on: February 21, 2009, 10:01:46 PM »
Golf analogy to LSAT?

Analogizing a learned skill to a learned skill?  How ridiculous!

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And if you expect a prepcourse to give you basics, you underestimate its purpose and value.

Um, I taught LSAT for years.  Classes cover the basics.  Not JUST the basics, but they're not going to start day one with the expectation that you know jack about what you're doing.

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If you have not improved your strengths and minimized your weaknesses as much as you could, then you will ultimately not get as much out of it as you could, hence you will not score as high as you could on the lsat.

If you develop bad habits before the class starts, you'll have more weaknesses to worry about minimizing.  And if struggling with books was a good alternative to live instruction, people wouldn't have paid $1200 to take my class.

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I have a 2.83 GPA and I am going to a great law school.

Congratulations.

ohioan

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Re: December 2009 LSAT hopeful with some questions
« Reply #7 on: February 22, 2009, 08:49:55 PM »
I have a 2.83 GPA and I am going to a great law school. 'nuff said.

Great law school with a 2.83 and a 161 means you're either black, Mexican, or lying.

None of the three, but thanks for sharing your prejudice.

ohioan

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Re: December 2009 LSAT hopeful with some questions
« Reply #8 on: February 22, 2009, 08:52:01 PM »
Best of luck to your students.

DerekShiHarvard

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Re: December 2009 LSAT hopeful with some questions
« Reply #9 on: March 01, 2009, 07:03:56 PM »
Definitely exhaust your independent study first. THen take the prep course.

This is like telling someone to spend a few months at the driving range and THEN hire a golf instructor.  Completely backwards. 

A prep-course is going to give you the basics.  It should come first.  Master the basics, get that strong foundation built, and then fine-tune it all with self-study until test day.

I really disagree with this. I think this is how it should go.

Diagnostic > Powerscore Bibles > Several practice tests to find weaknesses > Tutor to address weakness > Fine-tune your strategy by banging out as many practice tests as possible.
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