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Author Topic: Billing rate to salary ratio??  (Read 7139 times)

SEC_2L

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Re: Billing rate to salary ratio??
« Reply #20 on: February 22, 2009, 11:20:14 AM »
I agree that is probably close to true (your 90% theory), but you have to admit there are plenty of reasons for people not to be that into the lifestyle that BigLaw requires, even if they aren't just completely interested in public interest.

I'm married (but only 24) and don't go to school, or have a big desire to live, on one of the coasts or in a NYC/CHI/DC/LA market. I truly think I would be much happier living in say KC/DAL/MEM/STL and starting out making half of "BigLaw Market" at a smaller (10-100) firm in an area where the cost of living is equivalently half of those major markets...

I really don't think he was trying to be negative or any kind of elitist NZP. Honestly, it seems like you ARE bitter about something because there was nothing in his post to prompt you to attack him like that....

Thanks for sharing your experience DudeMan. I'm not sure I really want BigLaw either (not that I am purporting to even have the option at this point since I am a 1L and not T14) due to the lifestyle, but it is good to hear first-hand from associates like you so that I know the real deal.

Well, I don't jerk around due to the absence of the tool. I don't have a chip on my shoulder simply because I go to a lower tier law school and what's more important I have no desire to work for a biglaw firm because of the crazy hours and dicking around involved in it. Moreover, I don't have time to "jerk around alone in my room on the weekend" because I have kids and a life. I see where you are coming from though ;) Poor dude man, do you want some chocolate chip cookies with milk before bed?  ::)

Just bust your butt and don't rely on OCI alone.  Send out mass direct writes, they pay off.

NZP is obviously bitter about something.  Though, if she's middle-aged with a family and going to some crappy law school it's likely because her husband left her and she's trying to do something with her life, but always falls short. 

Also, 90% of the people on these boards that say they don't want biglaw, could never get it.  Interesting.... lol.

TheDudeMan

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Re: Billing rate to salary ratio??
« Reply #21 on: February 22, 2009, 12:13:01 PM »
I absolutely agree that there are folks out there that don't want Biglaw, but around here, it seems that everyone posting about not wanting it, could never get it.  Those not wanting it tend to be a minority, because even if you don't want a career in Biglaw, it's a fantastic stepping stone for other options as nowhere else will pump that much money into training you as a junior associate.


Miss P

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Re: Billing rate to salary ratio??
« Reply #22 on: February 22, 2009, 12:32:37 PM »
I absolutely agree that there are folks out there that don't want Biglaw, but around here, it seems that everyone posting about not wanting it, could never get it.  Those not wanting it tend to be a minority, because even if you don't want a career in Biglaw, it's a fantastic stepping stone for other options as nowhere else will pump that much money into training you as a junior associate.

i think you oversell BIGLAW! a bit.  what training are you talking about exactly?

I'm sure you all get some valuable training, but it certainly wouldn't help you in doing what I am going to do.  For whatever that's worth.

I also know plenty of people who can work biglaw who chose not to (or who are trying desperately to get out).
That's cool how you referenced a case.

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sheltron5000

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Re: Billing rate to salary ratio??
« Reply #23 on: February 22, 2009, 12:36:46 PM »
The attorneys i've talked to have all told me that if you can get biglaw starting out, you should do it. You cant really go from midlaw to big, so thats your only chance to try it. Plus, working in biglaw shows a willingness to put in long hours doing scuttwork if you have to.

Basically, biglaw is a resume enhancement that you only get one chance at so go do it for a year or two after law school, then decide whether you like it.  
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Miss P

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Re: Billing rate to salary ratio??
« Reply #24 on: February 22, 2009, 12:57:29 PM »
I'm sure you all get some valuable training, but it certainly wouldn't help you in doing what I am going to do.  For whatever that's worth.

i don't understand why you think this.

Well, in part because I know someone who does trainings for the first- and second-year associates at a top firm, and I am sure he does good work.  Also, if nothing else, you develop stamina.

I'm just saying that I would have trouble developing the most important skills for the work I want to do if I worked in a big firm, and I think there are plenty of other people in the same position.  No judgment either way, just different strokes.

The attorneys i've talked to have all told me that if you can get biglaw starting out, you should do it. You cant really go from midlaw to big, so thats your only chance to try it. Plus, working in biglaw shows a willingness to put in long hours doing scuttwork if you have to.

Basically, biglaw is a resume enhancement that you only get one chance at so go do it for a year or two after law school, then decide whether you like it.  

This just doesn't make sense for people who came to law school to do something else.  Yes, sure, it's a resume enhancement in some fields, but different kinds of lawyering require different skills.  If you plan to do direct services for indigent people, for instance, your time would be much better spent interning in a legal services office or learning Spanish.
That's cool how you referenced a case.

Quote from: archival
I'm so far from the end of my tether right now that I reckon I could knit myself some socks with the slack.

sheltron5000

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Re: Billing rate to salary ratio??
« Reply #25 on: February 23, 2009, 05:47:23 PM »
I'm sure you all get some valuable training, but it certainly wouldn't help you in doing what I am going to do.  For whatever that's worth.

i don't understand why you think this.

Well, in part because I know someone who does trainings for the first- and second-year associates at a top firm, and I am sure he does good work.  Also, if nothing else, you develop stamina.

I'm just saying that I would have trouble developing the most important skills for the work I want to do if I worked in a big firm, and I think there are plenty of other people in the same position.  No judgment either way, just different strokes.

The attorneys i've talked to have all told me that if you can get biglaw starting out, you should do it. You cant really go from midlaw to big, so thats your only chance to try it. Plus, working in biglaw shows a willingness to put in long hours doing scuttwork if you have to.

Basically, biglaw is a resume enhancement that you only get one chance at so go do it for a year or two after law school, then decide whether you like it. 

This just doesn't make sense for people who came to law school to do something else.  Yes, sure, it's a resume enhancement in some fields, but different kinds of lawyering require different skills.  If you plan to do direct services for indigent people, for instance, your time would be much better spent interning in a legal services office or learning Spanish.

Miss P, I agree 100 percent. I was speaking generally, y'know for all those of us who aren't sure exactly what specialty we'd like to pursue.

For people who do know, be sure to talk to professors, practitioners, and career counselors who work in your fields. Since there seem to be many ways to get to the position you want faster than the general route that most people go through.
LSN

I'd love to join this LGBT club.  It's the Legos, Gobots, Barbies, and other Toys group, right?  I'll show up with an armful of toys.