Law School Discussion

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Author Topic: Reading in Law School  (Read 1638 times)

Matthies

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Re: Reading in Law School
« Reply #10 on: February 18, 2009, 02:02:08 PM »
Dude, as a junior, seriously, go enjoy your life.  You are 2 years from entering law school.  Focus on the LSAT right now and go from there.

I don't think its unreasonable for him/her to think about this stuff now while taking a law type class in undergrad, maybe if more people did that, took that type class, we would have fewer clamssates who realize after 1L law school/law really are not for them. I'm assuming he is using these tips in his law class now.
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TheDudeMan

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Re: Reading in Law School
« Reply #11 on: February 18, 2009, 02:19:51 PM »
Did you ever take a "law school type class" in undergrad?  I did and they are a joke.  If anything, they get you excited about law school.  They are nothing like the bitter reality.


nealric

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Re: Reading in Law School
« Reply #12 on: February 18, 2009, 02:31:50 PM »
Quote
Did you ever take a "law school type class" in undergrad?  I did and they are a joke.  If anything, they get you excited about law school.  They are nothing like the bitter sweet sweet reality.

Fixed it for ya  ;)
Georgetown Law Graduate

Chief justice Earl Warren wasn't a stripper!
Now who's being naive?

TheDudeMan

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Re: Reading in Law School
« Reply #13 on: February 18, 2009, 03:00:19 PM »
And no forced curve or same exam structure I imagine...

,.,.,.;.,.,.

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Re: Reading in Law School
« Reply #14 on: February 18, 2009, 05:52:30 PM »
I didn't bother with any law school classes in UG, so I'll defer to Bosco and DudeMan on what they're like, but I can tell you that most cases are not 40 pages.  The few cases that I've encountered with that length are eminent domain cases, and actually reading Lucas v. South Carolina or Loretto v. Teleprompter sounds like a recipe for burn-out.  You can get the holding of these fairly straightforward cases -- regulatory takings or total takings -- in five minutes, without the long-winded SCOTUS reasoning.

Reading cases is the easy part of law school.  The hard part is figuring out exams.  Trust me, you shouldn't worry about this at all.

UnbiasedObserver

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Re: Reading in Law School
« Reply #15 on: February 18, 2009, 11:25:04 PM »
I took a con law class in undergrad and it was very similar to the con law class I took here, except a little less in depth.

Same here.  To be fair, though, my con law professor in UG was also an attorney who loved to talk about law school. 

UnbiasedObserver

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Re: Reading in Law School
« Reply #16 on: February 19, 2009, 07:59:23 AM »
Yeah my UG prof had taught LS con law before, and he tried to make it as similar as possible.  He did an alright job.

That's good to see. 

UnbiasedObserver

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Re: Reading in Law School
« Reply #17 on: February 19, 2009, 08:00:19 AM »
I don't think its unreasonable for him/her to think about this stuff now while taking a law type class in undergrad, maybe if more people did that, took that type class, we would have fewer clamssates who realize after 1L law school/law really are not for them. 

This is a very good point.  There are enough depressed lawyers today. 

TheDudeMan

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Re: Reading in Law School
« Reply #18 on: February 19, 2009, 09:00:42 AM »
I took a con law class in undergrad and it was very similar to the con law class I took here, except a little less in depth.

Same here.  To be fair, though, my con law professor in UG was also an attorney who loved to talk about law school. 

Yeah my UG prof had taught LS con law before, and he tried to make it as similar as possible.  He did an alright job.

The thing is, you can't replicate the most important part of law school.  A class full of driven, intelligent people, competing for grades on a forced curve with one issue spotting exam determining their fate.

Matthies

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Re: Reading in Law School
« Reply #19 on: February 19, 2009, 10:45:16 AM »
I took a con law class in undergrad and it was very similar to the con law class I took here, except a little less in depth.

Same here.  To be fair, though, my con law professor in UG was also an attorney who loved to talk about law school. 

Yeah my UG prof had taught LS con law before, and he tried to make it as similar as possible.  He did an alright job.

The thing is, you can't replicate the most important part of law school.  A class full of driven, intelligent people, competing for grades on a forced curve with one issue spotting exam determining their fate.

This is all true, and I see your point, but I think an into to law class in UG, even if not on the same level as a real class in LS, could be helpful to some people in deciding if they really want to do that kind of reading, briefing, thinking in law school for 3 years. I think there is a major difference between UG/Grad school in general and law school, one is academic, the other professional. A lot of my classmates thought law school was going to be intellectually stimulating in an academic way, rather than a teach you to think like a lawyer way, and thus where disappointed when they got there (because they never did any research on what it was really like). Personally Id like to see more folks take a class in UG if for nothing else then to let them know its a professional school not an academic experience.

*In clinical studies, Matthies was well tolerated, but women who are pregnant, nursing or might become pregnant should not take or handle Matthies due to a rare, but serious side effect called him having to make child support payments.