Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
;

Author Topic: Syracuse Law: Past, Present and Future  (Read 14635 times)

BeauEnigma

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 11
    • View Profile
Re: Syracuse Law: Past, Present and Future
« Reply #40 on: April 04, 2009, 10:34:57 PM »
Hey, I went to the ASD on April 3rd. Overall I came away more impressed than I had expected, especially because the facilities weren't as bad as people on here and other websites seemed to report. All of the classrooms that we saw (which represented all types of classrooms; large lecture to small meeting rooms) were very comfortable with good sized wheely chairs that had excellent support, nice marker boards that had multiple layers, overhead projectors, LCD projectors, great lighting, plugs under the table for recharging computers (with access at every seat) and good sight-lines to the board and other students. The mock courtrooms were especially nice, great wooden detail and a good representation of an actual courtroom in terms of setup (as well as usable doors representing the judges chambers and the holding area). On the first floor of one of the two main buildings there was a very large locker room for students to use. Lockers are assigned one the first day of classes and students keep them for all three years. One of our tour guides commented on how convenient they were because the books can get heavy and you don't need to bring them home all of the time, also in the winter you can store boots and have nice comfortable shoes waiting for walking to class. There are also several student lounge areas, a really great cafe (so you don't have to leave the COL buildings if you don't want to), LCD panel TVs for watching keeping on top of March Madness and study carols.

The library is one element that you often hear comments about on the web, and something that US News uses to create its rankings. While it is true that the library is not the newest of facilities, I really didn't find it as bad as the rumors. There are multiple printers and copiers (ALL free and easily hooked to your computer to print your own stuff), various group study rooms, two large silent rooms (one with great natural light as it is situated in the atrium), and a plethora of resources (including a floor of international law resources). The staff there were incredibly friendly and the hours are created in such a way that it really is there when you need it. The librarian even said that they give out their email, phone number, fax, and other contact information so that when they aren't around you can contact them for help. The only real down side is that there is a very slight 80's tang to the atrium area and the construction of the "newest" addition to the library.

Offices for various student resources are quite convenient, more so than at many other schools. This is mainly because the law school is really situated in two buildings that are linked together. Right outside of the library is the financial aid and admissions office, and down the hall from that (literally a yard or two away) is the career development department. We interacted with both departments twice at the ASD and both times I found them to be direct and helpful. Ann Myers in particular was quite refreshing; instead of blowing steam and saying that jobs will be thrown at you at Syracuse, she made it very clear that if you do not make the effort to meet with them, they cannot help you. She reiterated several times that she hates when students say "I don't want to bother you, but can you help me with this?" She said it was her job to be bothered and we must bother her as often as we desire. She was very approachable when I talked to her later and seemed to genuinely care about helping people find the jobs. I've heard some complaints online about how "worthless" that department is, but after meeting with her and rereading those comments, I believe that those complainers probably never really met with Career Development on a regular basis. Ever student that we talked to said that they are incredibly efficient and helpful, but each one made it very clear that you must meet with them to establish a relationship, otherwise they can't do anything for you.

I don't really know what else to say at the moment, but if anyone has specific questions, fire away! I am still waiting to hear back from one school, but Syracuse really did surprise me.

Bogart

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 15
    • View Profile
Re: Syracuse Law: Past, Present and Future
« Reply #41 on: April 05, 2009, 10:18:52 AM »
That was an awesome description of the college!  I was fortunate enough to take a tour a few months ago and I came away with a lot of the same thoughts that you did; particularily in regards to the class and courtrooms which I found to be as good as any other.  One question I do have is concerning the library, did they mention when they will start construction?  The reason I ask is more for my architectural interest than in any dislike for the library, which I found had everything that is needed; plus, to efficiently study all you need is a table and chair.  Lastly, did you interact with any other students, 1l, visitors, or otherwise? and if so what was the general vibe?  Thanks for any input.

Remarq

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 254
    • View Profile
Re: Syracuse Law: Past, Present and Future
« Reply #42 on: April 05, 2009, 05:44:07 PM »
Hey, I went to the ASD on April 3rd. Overall I came away more impressed than I had expected, especially because the facilities weren't as bad as people on here and other websites seemed to report. All of the classrooms that we saw (which represented all types of classrooms; large lecture to small meeting rooms) were very comfortable with good sized wheely chairs that had excellent support, nice marker boards that had multiple layers, overhead projectors, LCD projectors, great lighting, plugs under the table for recharging computers (with access at every seat) and good sight-lines to the board and other students. The mock courtrooms were especially nice, great wooden detail and a good representation of an actual courtroom in terms of setup (as well as usable doors representing the judges chambers and the holding area). On the first floor of one of the two main buildings there was a very large locker room for students to use. Lockers are assigned one the first day of classes and students keep them for all three years. One of our tour guides commented on how convenient they were because the books can get heavy and you don't need to bring them home all of the time, also in the winter you can store boots and have nice comfortable shoes waiting for walking to class. There are also several student lounge areas, a really great cafe (so you don't have to leave the COL buildings if you don't want to), LCD panel TVs for watching keeping on top of March Madness and study carols.

The library is one element that you often hear comments about on the web, and something that US News uses to create its rankings. While it is true that the library is not the newest of facilities, I really didn't find it as bad as the rumors. There are multiple printers and copiers (ALL free and easily hooked to your computer to print your own stuff), various group study rooms, two large silent rooms (one with great natural light as it is situated in the atrium), and a plethora of resources (including a floor of international law resources). The staff there were incredibly friendly and the hours are created in such a way that it really is there when you need it. The librarian even said that they give out their email, phone number, fax, and other contact information so that when they aren't around you can contact them for help. The only real down side is that there is a very slight 80's tang to the atrium area and the construction of the "newest" addition to the library.

Offices for various student resources are quite convenient, more so than at many other schools. This is mainly because the law school is really situated in two buildings that are linked together. Right outside of the library is the financial aid and admissions office, and down the hall from that (literally a yard or two away) is the career development department. We interacted with both departments twice at the ASD and both times I found them to be direct and helpful. Ann Myers in particular was quite refreshing; instead of blowing steam and saying that jobs will be thrown at you at Syracuse, she made it very clear that if you do not make the effort to meet with them, they cannot help you. She reiterated several times that she hates when students say "I don't want to bother you, but can you help me with this?" She said it was her job to be bothered and we must bother her as often as we desire. She was very approachable when I talked to her later and seemed to genuinely care about helping people find the jobs. I've heard some complaints online about how "worthless" that department is, but after meeting with her and rereading those comments, I believe that those complainers probably never really met with Career Development on a regular basis. Ever student that we talked to said that they are incredibly efficient and helpful, but each one made it very clear that you must meet with them to establish a relationship, otherwise they can't do anything for you.

I don't really know what else to say at the moment, but if anyone has specific questions, fire away! I am still waiting to hear back from one school, but Syracuse really did surprise me.


Thank you so much, BE. That was great. I have a question similar to Bogarts, SUCOL is #4 on Princeton Review's most competitive students list. Did you get the feeling that students were cutthroat?

BeauEnigma

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 11
    • View Profile
Re: Syracuse Law: Past, Present and Future
« Reply #43 on: April 05, 2009, 06:14:42 PM »
Bogart,

In regards to library construction, I don't really have any information on that. In fact, this is something that has been frustrating me as well. From time to time you hear mention of this new library and facilities renovation planned for the future, but I have not had any direct source confirmation. Like you, I am incredibly interested in the design for my own architectural interest. One student on TLS (or some other blog) had said it was going to be designed by the guy that designed the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame... but that too has yet to be confirmed by anyone. Although, the spoke nothing of these future plans, I can't complain too much because I didn't ask.

My interaction with other visitors was, unfortunately, fairly limited for several reasons. There seemed to be a very introspective atmosphere during the ASD, possibly because a majority of the visitors are still undecided and were thinking quite a bit about what was being said. The second reason, and perhaps I was the only one that felt this way, but a large number (at least 80%) brought parents along which made it unnecessary for anyone to meet new people because they already had someone to share their feelings with throughout the event. While I do understand that for some it seemed logical to bring your parents to the ASD, I chose not to for several reasons: this is my decision 100%, I am funding this by myself, and I knew that if I brought them I wouldn't meet new people. I guess I expected others to do the same, and perhaps I was wrong in expecting more of a social atmosphere that really is more appropriate at orientation. I don't think the lack of interaction should give the impression that it will be a particularly unsocial class, but rather that they are a very thoughtful group of people, serious about making the right decision and still on the fence at this point. In the end I did meet this awesome girl from Virginia who came alone as well and was also interested in International Law and a dual degree at Maxwell. We exchanged email addresses and are going to let each other know our decision.

The weirdest vibe was during the question and answer sessions. I had very specific international law questions, and I've been emailing that department quite a bit, so I really didn't have that many general questions that would be appropriate for these sessions. Unfortunately, others seemed to have the same problem so there were more awkward silences then I think the faculty, staff, and student presenters had expected. This is either because people were too nervous to speak in public, or had done their homework and didn't have that many questions.

While I was not able to get a good grasp on the vibe of the future 1L class, I was able to get a great vibe from the current students. EVERYONE that we met was really helpful and friendly, more importantly these students weren't all "Student Ambassadors" who basically make it their job to act that way, these were all people that genuinely like the school and wanted to share that. As expected, the 1Ls all looked slightly disheveled and tired, the 2Ls were a bit better, and the 3Ls all looked like professionals. We sat in on a 1L Property Law class, which was way more interesting than I thought in part because of the teacher and also because of the case they chose (something about a will dispute) for their midterm that they were going over. The woman that taught it was so direct and to the point, dragging the facts out of people and rarely giving them the answer, while adding a little humor from time to time. The students had a whole range of outfits, from casual to business casual, but I didn't see any pajamas. Everyone was on Facebook when the class started (hilarious), but they minimized the window when the professor began to speak. Those that dared distract themselves with it were later called on and humiliated a little with some humor. Overall, the idea of a friendly and fun community (something Syracuse claims sets them apart from a lot of the other law schools) was proven. One student said that there is some competition, but that it is all placed inwards..."students compete with themselves more than each other," she noted the plethora of study groups people form and how they even help each other finish midterms and finals.


BeauEnigma

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 11
    • View Profile
Re: Syracuse Law: Past, Present and Future
« Reply #44 on: April 05, 2009, 06:27:06 PM »
Remarq,

I did sense that students were very serious about their studies, but I really didn't feel that it was cutthroat. One of the student ambassadors that I emailed said that the only real competitive group are the international law students, primarily because they have to later compete with the bigger IL schools and have to meet high grade expectations. While the 1L grading curve can create competition, the students we spoke with said there are no moments of people ripping pages out of books or sending around computer viruses to sabotage others. Almost every student we talked to mentioned some group of friends that they study with and do papers with. I think this is all because of SUCOL's emphasis on the importance of networking, making alumni connections, and staying connected in a positive way to keep your career moving forward. It is a fact that the guy next to you in law school today could be a partner in the firm that you want to be a part of tomorrow.

Hope that helps!

GhostofTomJoad

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 72
    • View Profile
Re: Syracuse Law: Past, Present and Future
« Reply #45 on: April 07, 2009, 04:47:08 AM »
Remarq,

I did sense that students were very serious about their studies, but I really didn't feel that it was cutthroat. One of the student ambassadors that I emailed said that the only real competitive group are the international law students, primarily because they have to later compete with the bigger IL schools and have to meet high grade expectations. While the 1L grading curve can create competition, the students we spoke with said there are no moments of people ripping pages out of books or sending around computer viruses to sabotage others. Almost every student we talked to mentioned some group of friends that they study with and do papers with. I think this is all because of SUCOL's emphasis on the importance of networking, making alumni connections, and staying connected in a positive way to keep your career moving forward. It is a fact that the guy next to you in law school today could be a partner in the firm that you want to be a part of tomorrow.

Hope that helps!

I'd just like to thank you for your insights and thoughtful posts about SU Law.  I didn't have a chance to go to ASD due to work obligations but I have researched SU Law fairly extensively.  I was admitted for fall of '09 but I am currently deciding between SU and Seton Hall Law.  My primary selection criteria will probably be employment prospects.  I wish you the best of luck at SU Law! 

bdc

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 147
    • View Profile
Re: Syracuse Law: Past, Present and Future
« Reply #46 on: April 07, 2009, 12:25:08 PM »
The ASD is what hooked me to the school.  They did a great job of selling me on SU.  In addition, the students are no more cutthroat than any other school I would imagine.  You will always have the few snobby types but other than that I did not see it as an issue.  Its a great school and I have found that it is looked pretty well here on the west coast.  Probably because of the basketball program but who cares.  It is expensive but the classrooms are a nice as any other school and some of the programs are well worth it.  The clinics, the externships and the certificate programs are great.

Ninja1

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 3089
  • ☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: Syracuse Law: Past, Present and Future
« Reply #47 on: April 07, 2009, 11:41:36 PM »
How's the orange level? It seems like they play up the color enough in their materials to make you go blind (applied and accepted last year, but decided not to attend when better options materialized, still like the school overall). Thoughts?
I'mma stay bumpin' till I bump my head on my tomb.

Remarq

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 254
    • View Profile
Re: Syracuse Law: Past, Present and Future
« Reply #48 on: April 11, 2009, 04:22:59 PM »
Is anyone concerned that the Cuse won't be in the top 100 this year? This was the first year they were T2 in a while. Thoughts on them either staying at 100 or moving up?

I don't know if I'll attend if they drop to T3.

Ninja1

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 3089
  • ☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: Syracuse Law: Past, Present and Future
« Reply #49 on: April 11, 2009, 05:06:04 PM »
Is anyone concerned that the Cuse won't be in the top 100 this year? This was the first year they were T2 in a while. Thoughts on them either staying at 100 or moving up?

I don't know if I'll attend if they drop to T3.

It really doesn't matter much. Everyone knows they come in right around 100 every year, it's just the difference of if they come in at 98 or 102. NBD.
I'mma stay bumpin' till I bump my head on my tomb.