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Author Topic: ITT: i discuss midlaw  (Read 4477 times)

uh huh.

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Re: ITT: i discuss midlaw
« Reply #20 on: February 17, 2009, 01:36:32 PM »
And let me add that getting hands-on experience may be one of the things that you mention in your cover letter and/or interview with a MidLaw firm. I think that if you are particularly accomplished and coming from a higher-ranked school, you really have to sell MidLaw partners on why you're willing to forego more money in BigLaw to be at their firm - talking about hands-on experience and client/partner exposure is definitely one way to do that.

Remarq

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Re: ITT: i discuss midlaw
« Reply #21 on: February 17, 2009, 01:42:54 PM »
Are the people you work with T14ers or are they top 1/4 students from local schools? What kind of people get midlaw jobs?

Matthies

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Re: ITT: i discuss midlaw
« Reply #22 on: February 17, 2009, 01:57:25 PM »
I agree with everything Uh huh has said, and most of what Bot Bot said. But I think its important to add contacts are key. The clerking I did and interviews I got all came from people I knew who recommend me. Since most midlaw firms donít do OCI they rely heavily on word of mouth recommendations. Getting someone you know and they know to make the introduction and speak on your behalf can be really helpful.

Also talking about friend you have in common during the interview helps make it more personal. All this takes due diligence, but you will be surprised by how small the legal community really is, someone you know will likely know someone at the firm your targeting (assuming you have taken the time in law school to meet several lawyers and judges). Knowing people is how the law gets done at midlaw firms anyway.
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uh huh.

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Re: ITT: i discuss midlaw
« Reply #23 on: February 17, 2009, 02:45:58 PM »
Are the people you work with T14ers or are they top 1/4 students from local schools? What kind of people get midlaw jobs?

It's funny - I was just talking about this the other day with one of my co-workers. The thing that I really like about my firm is that we have people from all over the place - T14 through T4 (in fact, two of our most well-known partners are from a T3 school). I can't really compare the first-year class because, well, I'm the only one, lol. What I will say is that every single person who works for the firm has an impressive bio in terms of their accomplishments; and I'm talking about stuff beyond being on law review. The people in my firm are interesting, have done some amazing things in their lives, and many came to the law as a second career. That said, almost all have law school accomplishments that "look good" on the website, but those range from moot court to clinical work to journal work (it's pretty broad). I think the firm wants people who can "do" and not just spew legaleze. And I think think they've achieved that.

Talk Is Cheap

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Re: ITT: i discuss midlaw
« Reply #24 on: February 18, 2009, 05:21:21 PM »
Uh Huh has sold me on midlaw.

Assuming I can find one with a proper salary in my secondary market of choice.

Sounds heavenly, though, compared to all of the horror stories about biglaw. Really makes you wonder why so many people submit to the punishment. I guess prestige and lateraling opportunities do say a lot.

Naked Promise

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Re: ITT: i discuss midlaw
« Reply #25 on: February 18, 2009, 07:34:31 PM »
Uh Huh has sold me on midlaw.

Assuming I can find one with a proper salary in my secondary market of choice.

Sounds heavenly, though, compared to all of the horror stories about biglaw. Really makes you wonder why so many people submit to the punishment. I guess prestige and lateraling opportunities do say a lot.

I think it's all about competition. There's a great law review article in Vanderbilt's LR about this. I don't remember the citation, but it's a good one.

I don't think many students realize what they are getting into and/or choose to ignore reality. If you think about it, we law students are bred to compete from the beginning. We start with the LSAT which we all know isn't competitive at all. Then the admissions cycle hits and it takes it up another few notches. We are all compared based on our numbers. Then law school comes and the same thing happens. We compete for the highest grades. Those that get to the top feel good and want to stay that way. Then job searches come along and we all think the money and "prestige" is the way to go. Plus our classmates will think we are super prestidigiouss too! It doesn't stop there. You get to the law firm and you end up competing with other associates for the few partner slots. You all try to outbill each other, etc. Those that actually get to partner just keep competing for the biggest paychecks/bonuses. Then they get to the end of life and realize they have a whole bunch of money, five ex-wives, a bunch of children that won't talk to them and no happiness.

That's just my opinion anyway.

uh huh.

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Re: ITT: i discuss midlaw
« Reply #26 on: February 19, 2009, 10:02:52 AM »
I think it's all about competition. . . . I don't think many students realize what they are getting into and/or choose to ignore reality.

I think that when one has not worked in the pressure-cooker before, it's impossible to really know how draining and miserable it can be. See, I fell for the money/prestige thing, too, when I was 22. I spent 12 years in a highly competitive, corporate-climbing, ulcer-causing business before I went to law school, and I was well aware of the contract I'd be signing with the devil if I went into BigLaw. I redefined what "success" meant to me when I began law school - it is no longer about getting to the top of some perceived mountain or "winning" or being "prestigeous" or even making a crap-load of money. Success for me now is about constantly learning new things, doing excellent work for my clients, and being respected by my colleagues for the product I put out. I trust that the money will come with the quality of my output, and I will be able to pay my bills comfortably. So in seeking to fulfill my new definition of success, I looked for a firm that matched my goals, and it so happened that MidLaw was where I found that (and I was prepared to take a job in SmallLaw if necessary to find the right match). I have the benefit of past experience that guided me in my choices. I believe that is why many of my younger brethren do not quite understand what they will be sacraficing for a BigLaw job.

Talk Is Cheap

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Re: ITT: i discuss midlaw
« Reply #27 on: February 24, 2009, 11:15:46 PM »
I think it's all about competition. . . . I don't think many students realize what they are getting into and/or choose to ignore reality.

I think that when one has not worked in the pressure-cooker before, it's impossible to really know how draining and miserable it can be. See, I fell for the money/prestige thing, too, when I was 22. I spent 12 years in a highly competitive, corporate-climbing, ulcer-causing business before I went to law school, and I was well aware of the contract I'd be signing with the devil if I went into BigLaw. I redefined what "success" meant to me when I began law school - it is no longer about getting to the top of some perceived mountain or "winning" or being "prestigeous" or even making a crap-load of money. Success for me now is about constantly learning new things, doing excellent work for my clients, and being respected by my colleagues for the product I put out. I trust that the money will come with the quality of my output, and I will be able to pay my bills comfortably. So in seeking to fulfill my new definition of success, I looked for a firm that matched my goals, and it so happened that MidLaw was where I found that (and I was prepared to take a job in SmallLaw if necessary to find the right match). I have the benefit of past experience that guided me in my choices. I believe that is why many of my younger brethren do not quite understand what they will be sacraficing for a BigLaw job.

This was illuminating...thank you!

OnTheRoad

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Re: ITT: i discuss midlaw
« Reply #28 on: April 27, 2009, 08:57:46 PM »
bump, in case anyone is still around. I'm headed to a midlaw firm to summer this year, and love everything that I've seen about it so far.

I'm wondering if any of you know anything about partner pay at midlaw? Any sense of where it is?

Number81

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Re: ITT: i discuss midlaw
« Reply #29 on: April 28, 2009, 02:26:39 AM »
I'm really interested in the above question too. Also, are the people who get biglaw (say top 10% or whatever) the ones who have the ability to get midlaw or do midlaw firms go deeper in to the class. I'm talking about non-T14 students.

Can anyone shed some light on this question?  (I hope I didn't skip over the answer!)

According to what I understand, biglaw = grades, merits, and being normal in the interview.  Small firms = networking.  Is midlaw somewhere in between or what?
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