Law School Discussion

Feelin dwon a bit --looking for non trad support

squireJons

  • ***
  • 16
  • beware the law school scam
    • View Profile
    • lawschoolscam.blogspot.com
Re: Feelin dwon a bit --looking for non trad support
« Reply #10 on: April 18, 2009, 11:33:08 AM »
consider yourself lucky, eddie. This will give you more time to do research about how there are far fewer jobs that applicants for them and how there is far less work for all the solos than there are solos.

Don't do it. Just don't do it.

Re: Feelin dwon a bit --looking for non trad support
« Reply #11 on: April 18, 2009, 01:29:04 PM »
consider yourself lucky, eddie. This will give you more time to do research about how there are far fewer jobs that applicants for them and how there is far less work for all the solos than there are solos.

Don't do it. Just don't do it.

Your logic does not make sense. There are always fewer jobs than there are applicants for them, which is why there will always be a positive unemployment rate. If we followed your logic, then nobody should complete any level of education.

Re: Feelin dwon a bit --looking for non trad support
« Reply #12 on: April 18, 2009, 01:45:27 PM »
I'd definitely recommend a prep course. I like kaplan, but I suspect they are all pretty good. Plan to take the sept. lsat, but cancel if you aren't where you need to be on carefully timed practice tests. The timing is crucial and what makes the test hard, practice with a timer and be strict. Try to get to a point where you can consistently finish all the sections in less time than allotted, that way if a timekeeper screws up a little or something is a bit more difficult than expected on test day, you'll still be ok.

Most people do score worse on the real thing than practice, but I think that may be due to most people fudging the timing a bit when practicing. Also how you deal with stress will matter a lot. I practiced with very strict timing and I tend to do really well under stress. My actual score was better than any of my practice scores. Of course, YYMV.

squireJons

  • ***
  • 16
  • beware the law school scam
    • View Profile
    • lawschoolscam.blogspot.com
Re: Feelin dwon a bit --looking for non trad support
« Reply #13 on: April 18, 2009, 01:55:52 PM »
consider yourself lucky, eddie. This will give you more time to do research about how there are far fewer jobs that applicants for them and how there is far less work for all the solos than there are solos.

Don't do it. Just don't do it.

Your logic does not make sense. There are always fewer jobs than there are applicants for them, which is why there will always be a positive unemployment rate. If we followed your logic, then nobody should complete any level of education.


well, seeing as how I am a practicing lawyer and you are a law school applicant, guess which one of us is more knowledgeable about the facts on the ground?


Re: Feelin dwon a bit --looking for non trad support
« Reply #14 on: April 18, 2009, 03:20:36 PM »
consider yourself lucky, eddie. This will give you more time to do research about how there are far fewer jobs that applicants for them and how there is far less work for all the solos than there are solos.

Don't do it. Just don't do it.

Your logic does not make sense. There are always fewer jobs than there are applicants for them, which is why there will always be a positive unemployment rate. If we followed your logic, then nobody should complete any level of education.


well, seeing as how I am a practicing lawyer and you are a law school applicant, guess which one of us is more knowledgeable about the facts on the ground?



Our respective positions within a given field have no relevance to the logic of your argument. You are saying that the OP should not go into the field of law because there are fewer jobs than applicants for those jobs. This is not isolated to the field of law and, as I pointed out, is true of the labor market as a whole. I never stated that you were wrong on that fact, so knowledge about "the facts on the ground" is irrelevant. I am not going to reiterate my argument because you can simply scroll up and read it again. So, please use the education you received in law school to point out where my argument fails. Otherwise, do not try to win an argument by use of your position.

OingoBoingo

  • ****
  • 517
  • Simply the best band from the 80's
    • View Profile
Re: Feelin dwon a bit --looking for non trad support
« Reply #15 on: May 25, 2009, 12:49:55 PM »
Focus on doing the best that you can. 145 is not a bad place to start. I did not end up with much higher before attending a T3. Now that I have my JD and a job, I can say that the LSAT really is a worthless measure of potential. Focus on what you want law school to do for you and go to a place (rankings be damned) that will allow you to do just that.....

Oingo

gzl

Re: Feelin dwon a bit --looking for non trad support
« Reply #16 on: May 26, 2009, 01:44:45 AM »
consider yourself lucky, eddie. This will give you more time to do research about how there are far fewer jobs that applicants for them and how there is far less work for all the solos than there are solos.

Don't do it. Just don't do it.

Your logic does not make sense. There are always fewer jobs than there are applicants for them, which is why there will always be a positive unemployment rate. If we followed your logic, then nobody should complete any level of education.


well, seeing as how I am a practicing lawyer and you are a law school applicant, guess which one of us is more knowledgeable about the facts on the ground?



And being unable to fit known facts into simple elementary logic, I'd be worried about your ability to fit them to the law.  If this level of thought is the competition out there, the OP has little to worry about.

Re: Feelin dwon a bit --looking for non trad support
« Reply #17 on: June 02, 2009, 08:01:04 AM »
For those of you that are currently working full time, but hope to go to law school how are you preparing for the LSAT?  I was out of work for a few months from back surgery, and I got the brilliant idea that I should go to law school.  I bought the Kaplan LSAT book, and started reading it and practicing.  Mind you, it was difficult since pain killers tend to make you sleepy, but I tried, and found I enjoyed taking the practice tests.  I never did get to the point of taking a real practice test with the set time limits, because I had to go back to work and haven't been back into my book since.  (that was 4 years ago!)

The desire is still there, although I've done a great job of convincing myself that I just need to stay in this job and pay my bills, and how will I do that if I'm in school?
So, I am ready to get the heck out of a job I hate and am back to thinking about Law school.

How are you guys studying if you are working full time, and have family obligations?

I have no children, only pets that require a lot of my time to expel their energy, and then I'm tired too.  I could make myself study for an hour or two every night, and I will once I finally make that decision this is what I'm meant to do. 

Any help on how you study for the test and work, and fulfill your family commitments is greatly appreciated!

Re: Feelin dwon a bit --looking for non trad support
« Reply #18 on: June 02, 2009, 10:11:03 AM »
I am not saying that I am a good example, but I was working full time, and often traveling for work, while I was attempting to study for the LSAT. I didn't put as much study time in as most, but found that for me the best thing was to set aside time (1-2 hours) every other day for the three to four weeks leading up to the test. I would work on one section a night. I took the test twice, the second time I focused my studying on the areas that needed work. I also have two dogs that require alot of exercise, but did manage to find some time. However, I can tell by reading this blog that I had very minimal studying compared to most others, but it worked for me.

OingoBoingo

  • ****
  • 517
  • Simply the best band from the 80's
    • View Profile
Re: Feelin dwon a bit --looking for non trad support
« Reply #19 on: June 15, 2009, 08:58:13 PM »
Congratulations on the baby-on-the-way!

As far as encouragement - I'd just like to echo the words about baby's first year.  I'll be 30 when I start law school this coming year, and I have two kids.  I love 'em both to death, but I am glad that our youngest will be close to one year old by the time I start school.  Four years in, it's become obvious to me that parenthood will never be 'easy.'  It is certainly rewarding.  But the first year of a child's life can be particularly challenging, and your entire family will likely find itself in transition.  If you were to take on law school and new parenthood at the same time, you could easily end up shortchanging yourself, your family, and your legal education all at once.

So don't be discouraged.  This year's LSAT score may have put you in good position to get a great start on both parenthood and your legal career.

We had our first child at the end of my first semester. It was a very difficult period. While I cannot in good faith recommend doing it, our family is proof that it can be done. I graduated in May and as I study for the bar, our family is expecting a second child late in the fall. Good luck to all on the LSAT!

Oingo