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ritkaa

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logic game must be true questions
« on: February 06, 2009, 07:14:25 PM »
I am pretty good at answering the must be true questions that also give some background info but I am terrible at answering those that in a single sentence say: "which of the following mus be true?" And no other info.

Can someone explain the procedure? Thanks!
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zippyandzap

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Re: logic game must be true questions
« Reply #1 on: February 06, 2009, 07:17:34 PM »
I am pretty good at answering the must be true questions that also give some background info but I am terrible at answering those that in a single sentence say: "which of the following mus be true?" And no other info.

Can someone explain the procedure? Thanks!
Rita

they're looking for a deduction that can be made from the setup alone.

LawDog3

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Re: logic game must be true questions
« Reply #2 on: February 06, 2009, 08:48:26 PM »
I am pretty good at answering the must be true questions that also give some background info but I am terrible at answering those that in a single sentence say: "which of the following mus be true?" And no other info.

Can someone explain the procedure? Thanks!
Rita

If it occurs in a logic game, the thing you must remember is that the information they ask for is true no matter what; it's based on the info given for the setup. If you cannot answer the question, it means you have not fully analyzed the constraints and their implications.

Be sure to do this before delving into the questions, because the MBT logic game question you ask about should be the easiest question to answer, other than the "orientation question"(usually, but not always, the first question of a game - designed t give the examinee a feel for the game)

Be sure to extrapolate the rules beyond the information given. If you get into the habit of doing this, LG will be easy and fun.

Here's a simple example:

Seven cars, a Bentley, a Cadillac, a Delorean, a Farrari, a Jaguar, a Lexus, and a Mercedes, are lined up in numerical order from  #1 to #7, from left to right. Each car sits in one and only one slot. The car types are as follows:

The Cadillac sits in the fourth slot

The Delorean always sits directly next to the Cadillac

The Farrari never occupies the first or last slot in the lot

The Delorean always sits in a lower-numbered slot than the Jaguar, which always sits in a higher numbered slot than the slot directly to the right of the Cadillac.

What do we know right off the bat?

#1) The Delorean is going to drive a lot of this game, as will the Jag and Farrari. The Delorean is always in slot #3 or #5. That's in stone. So you know you have at least two diagrams, with two distinct scenarios, to draw.

But there's more: We also know that the Jaguar is always in slot #6 or #7. So we have how many possible scenarios? Keep in mind that the Cadillac is always in slot #4.

One in which the Delorean is is #3 while the Jag is in #6 (1,2,5 and 7 are open)
One in which the Delorean is in #3 while the Jag is in #7 (1,2,5 and 6 are open)
One in which the Delorean is in #5 while the Jag is in #6 (1,2,3 and 7 are open)
One in which the Delorean is in #5 while the Jag is in #7 (1,2,3 and 6 are open)

Now what are your independents/floaters?

The Bentley
The Ferrari (which is always going in #2-#6). BTW, always re-state negative rules as positives. F: not #1 & not #7 = F: #2-#6
The Lexus
The Mercedes
   
What are their possible slots within the four scenarios? Run through it.

Well, in that first scenario, you already know that the Ferrari has to occupy #2 or #5)

But you should also notice something else distinctive right away:

Any of the floaters can park in slot #2,#3, #5 or #6 (indeed, it MBT that the Fararri occupies one of these)

So an example of a "complete and accurrate list" question (CBT) is already answered, as well as a potential MBT question

You also know that it MBT that the Bentley, Lexus or Mercedes occupies #1.

It also MBT that at least two of those four floaters sits left of the Cadillac.


We know all of this before even attempting to answer a question.

The work you are doing up-front answers the MBT questions, that's why you shouldn't dive into the questions so quickly; you will answer three or four questions without doing any work. 

When you have trouble with a "naked" MBT question, you have not done all of your analysis. It is not necessary to write every possible observation down when doing the setup, but you should certainly write down the immediate implications of the rules given (go as far as you comfortably can), which would be those four diagrams and the floaters' possible slots. It takes some work, but in the end, it's much faster because you can just pick your answer with little or no chugging and plugging of the variables. This is how games are finished quickly.