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Author Topic: Likelihood of landing a patent job coming out of a tier 2 school  (Read 1346 times)

vonska

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Hi, I'm currently an undergrad at USC, double-majoring in math and philosophy. My cumulative GPA is 3.84 and I've been scoring in the low to mid-160's on my LSAT diags (with 164 being my most recent diag). I've been thinking about applying to some joint JD-Masters of Computer science programs with the hopes of getting into software patents. Obviously, given my scores, I probably won't be landing into any tier 1 joint programs, however I don't mind going to either Syracuse or Santa Clara for such programs. My only concern is the likelihood of landing a patent job upon graduating. What are the chances? And if bad, how bad?

Any feedback would be REALLY appreciated. Thanks in advance.

AmyWaxFanClubPresident

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Re: Likelihood of landing a patent job coming out of a tier 2 school
« Reply #1 on: January 25, 2009, 01:43:32 PM »
Not great, comp sci is not a highly recruited degree for patent work.  Not to mention that not all comp sci degrees make you eligible to sit for the patent bar.  You should look into that.
"This semester I will plunge you into the slough of despair, and when you are at your most desolate and are ready to give up, I will give you some light" - Professor Amy Wax

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Re: Likelihood of landing a patent job coming out of a tier 2 school
« Reply #2 on: January 25, 2009, 03:29:07 PM »
Unfortunately, because you undergrad major isn't CompSci, you are going to have a harder time sitting for the exam. You will have to get in course by course, most likely under the "engineering" track, which I think requires 42 hours of course work, including 8 hours of Calc based Physics with a lab (note: if you AP'ed out of Calc based Physics, you might be in trouble because you don't have the lab requirement). Some of your CompSci class might qualify, some may not. You really need to check out, and read carefully, the qualifications to sit for the exam on uspto.gov.

EE or CompEng degree is very highly sought after. CompSci I'm not too sure about. I know in interviews I was often asked how much hardware engineering I remembered (I have a CompEng Masters with Software Engineering work experience). Honestly, if you want to go joint, I might think about doing Comp Engineering instead (if available). More of your classes will qualify for the patent exam, plus it will be good for you to get some hardware exposure. I didn't have trouble finding a great job, even in this economy, due to my background (My school and grades are very good, but not excellent. my numbers coming in were 3.87/164).
 

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Re: Likelihood of landing a patent job coming out of a tier 2 school
« Reply #3 on: January 25, 2009, 03:59:12 PM »
Yes make sure you actually qualify.  CompSci is not highly needed.  Why?  First, a lot of software is copyrightable, not patentable.  Second, there is much less technical knowledge needed for processing software patents.  Third, most engineering/science people either know how to program or will learn enough about it when they start working

Unfortunately, because you undergrad major isn't CompSci, you are going to have a harder time sitting for the exam. You will have to get in course by course, most likely under the "engineering" track, which I think requires 42 hours of course work, including 8 hours of Calc based Physics with a lab (note: if you AP'ed out of Calc based Physics, you might be in trouble because you don't have the lab requirement). Some of your CompSci class might qualify, some may not. You really need to check out, and read carefully, the qualifications to sit for the exam on uspto.gov.

EE or CompEng degree is very highly sought after. CompSci I'm not too sure about. I know in interviews I was often asked how much hardware engineering I remembered (I have a CompEng Masters with Software Engineering work experience). Honestly, if you want to go joint, I might think about doing Comp Engineering instead (if available). More of your classes will qualify for the patent exam, plus it will be good for you to get some hardware exposure. I didn't have trouble finding a great job, even in this economy, due to my background (My school and grades are very good, but not excellent. my numbers coming in were 3.87/164).
 
"This semester I will plunge you into the slough of despair, and when you are at your most desolate and are ready to give up, I will give you some light" - Professor Amy Wax

rodya

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Re: Likelihood of landing a patent job coming out of a tier 2 school
« Reply #4 on: January 25, 2009, 06:36:16 PM »
In the interest of saving some space I had the same question but with a BS and MS in Chemical Engineering.  Should have the patent bar done by September when I start school.  I've narrowed it down to Temple, Brooklyn, or Drexel (I'm intrigued by the co-op program and liked the school)

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Re: Likelihood of landing a patent job coming out of a tier 2 school
« Reply #5 on: January 25, 2009, 08:36:36 PM »
I'd recommend taking the patent bar after 1L.  In general I'm a huge supporter of Temple because of its placement/cost ratio, but it may be the wrong decision in this situation.  There just isn't any technical IP work (other than Woodcock) in Philly.  For the same reasons, but with no presence outside Philly, I wouldn't recommend Drexel.  This may be the rare situation where I'd suggest paying more for Brooklyn as it will give you access to firms with IP groups.

Edit:  For those reading at a T10 school, don't feel like you need to take the patent bar before OCI.  However, it is important for students that need the edge at their school's OCI.

In the interest of saving some space I had the same question but with a BS and MS in Chemical Engineering.  Should have the patent bar done by September when I start school.  I've narrowed it down to Temple, Brooklyn, or Drexel (I'm intrigued by the co-op program and liked the school)
"This semester I will plunge you into the slough of despair, and when you are at your most desolate and are ready to give up, I will give you some light" - Professor Amy Wax

vonska

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Re: Likelihood of landing a patent job coming out of a tier 2 school
« Reply #6 on: January 26, 2009, 03:23:30 PM »
thanks everyone. I appreciate your taking the time to write all this.

vonska

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Re: Likelihood of landing a patent job coming out of a tier 2 school
« Reply #7 on: January 26, 2009, 03:36:03 PM »
Also while were at it, does anyone know any schools that offer joint JD Masters of engineering program. I know Syracuse does. What other schools do?

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Re: Likelihood of landing a patent job coming out of a tier 2 school
« Reply #8 on: January 26, 2009, 05:23:30 PM »
Not sure, but I should mention 2 things.  First, if you have all the pre-reqs done to gain admission to a Masters in Engineering, you are probably eligible to sit for the bar already.  Second, if you don't have the prior course work (yet still can get in), the masters will be worthless.

Edit: Let me clarify this.  A masters does not qualify you to sit for the patent bar without a bachelors in the subject unless you also have the undergrad classes needed.  Generally,
24 semester hours in physics. Only physics courses for physics majors will be accepted. OR
32 semester hours in a combination consisting of the following:
 8 semester hours of chemistry or 8 semester hours of physics, and
 24 semester hours in biology, botany, microbiology, or molecular biology.
The 8 semester hours in chemistry or 8 semester hours of physics must be obtained in two
sequential courses, each course including a lab.  Only courses for science or engineering
majors will be accepted OR
30 semester hours in chemistry. Only chemistry courses for chemistry majors will be accepted. OR
40 semester hours in a combination consisting of the following:
8 semester hours of chemistry or 8 semester hours of physics, and
32 semester hours of chemistry, physics, biology, botany, microbiology, molecular biology, or
engineering.  (For Computer Science, see other acceptable course work.)
The 8 semester hours of chemistry or 8 semester hours of physics must be obtained in two
sequential courses, each course including a lab.  Only courses for science or engineering
majors will be accepted.  For Computer Science, see other "Other Acceptable Course
Work."
 



Also while were at it, does anyone know any schools that offer joint JD Masters of engineering program. I know Syracuse does. What other schools do?
"This semester I will plunge you into the slough of despair, and when you are at your most desolate and are ready to give up, I will give you some light" - Professor Amy Wax

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Re: Likelihood of landing a patent job coming out of a tier 2 school
« Reply #9 on: January 26, 2009, 07:16:02 PM »
Just to add to this: I have a Masters in Computer Engineering, and as of right this second I can't sit for the exam. Why? I AP'ed out of Physics, so I didn't have 8 hours of Calc Based Physics in undergrad, and my master's program accepted my AP credit for their program. So, I'm taking Physics now. Good times!

I think this is sort of bizarre, but that is the way it is. Also if you degree isn't EXACTLY one of the ones on their list, it doesn't count for the bachelor's degree option (but you still may be able to get in through the course by course option).

Now, I think saying the Master's is "worthless" is a bit of a stretch. You most likely will get the courses you need while getting the degree (but not in Comp Sci, because I think they need to be "engineering" courses, they have a list of things that would qualify). However, poster above is correct in saying that a Master's degree in a technical field doesn't not qualify you for the exam.