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Author Topic: ADVICE for Incoming-1Ls  (Read 2897 times)

MrDiggler

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Re: ADVICE for Incoming-1Ls
« Reply #10 on: January 20, 2009, 10:48:55 PM »
First post sums it up well. But I just want to emphasis that briefing is the biggest waste of time you can engage in. Thanks.
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Slumdog Lovebutton

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Re: ADVICE for Incoming-1Ls
« Reply #11 on: January 21, 2009, 07:49:05 AM »
First post sums it up well. But I just want to emphasis that briefing is the biggest waste of time you can engage in. Thanks.

meh, depends on the class.  I had a professor who didn't allow laptops in class, and his lessons were all structured around the one or two cases we'd be asked to read per class.  I found that the most efficient way to take and organize class notes was to brief the cases the night before, print them out, then take notes on the back of each brief.

especially as a 1L, briefing during the first semester helped me process the cases better and understand what it was I was supposed to be picking out of them.  I stopped briefing for two of my three classes at different points in the semester, but I didn't think it was a waste of time while I was doing it.
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no634

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Re: ADVICE for Incoming-1Ls
« Reply #12 on: January 24, 2009, 11:06:01 PM »
Also, I don't think that facts of the cases matter AT ALL.  My exams were all essays were I applied the general rules and principles of the law to a specific fact pattern the teacher created.  This style is used by many law schools.  While the fact pattern sometimes bore resemblance to cases we read in class, the teacher did not expect us to cite the cases and wanted us only to apply the principles of the case to the hypothetical.  On my outline, I had one sentence for every case (which summarized the holding and facts) and one or two bullet points, as needed, to capture specific rules or "big ideas" contained within the case.


Generally good advice but case facts matter for certain professors (esp. Constitutional Law). If the professor will want you to reason by analogy or reference cases, they'll tell you... hopefully.

Also, DO THE READING...most professors cold call students and many (at least at my school) deduct points from your grade if your are unprepared.


no634

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Re: ADVICE for Incoming-1Ls
« Reply #13 on: January 24, 2009, 11:07:13 PM »
Here's four simple tips to doing well in law school.
1) Do ALL the reading. The teacher is assigning the material for a reason... and if you're a FT student without a job, then there's no excuse for not getting the reading done.
2) Make your own outline. Making your own outline forces you to incorporate all the material yourself and figure out how it all goes together. You can use someone else's outline as a guide, or as a 2nd outline, but you need to really assemble the material for yourself.
3) Don't rely on unassigned supplements. I've seen far too many people rely on Crunchtime and E&E and other supplements rather than actually putting in the work on the assigned material. If you want an explanation of something you didn't understand, then maybe a 'Mastering Torts' will be helpful, but remember... these are SUPPLEMENTS, not REPLACEMENTS for the actual cases.
4) Pay attention to the cases listed in the notes section of the differetn casebooks, or any footnoted case that's more than just a citation. I've seen professors grab the facts from a footnote case and use that as the basis for an exam question.
Good luck,
Rob

Good advice, just don't get too caught up in the footnotes. Certain books have sprawling footnotes with tons of hypos that tend to bog students down rather than help.

JD-Maybe

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Re: ADVICE for Incoming-1Ls
« Reply #14 on: January 27, 2009, 03:29:52 AM »
Do the reading!!!  Don't get carried away with supplements and do your own outline.  Study groups will be hard to coordinate at first but it all falls into place eventually.  Look for people who compliment your learning style that way what you miss they know and vice versa.  Don't share your grades and be nice to everyone!

Slumdog Lovebutton

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Re: ADVICE for Incoming-1Ls
« Reply #15 on: January 27, 2009, 12:47:15 PM »
Do the reading!!!  Don't get carried away with supplements and do your own outline.  Study groups will be hard to coordinate at first but it all falls into place eventually.  Look for people who compliment your learning style that way what you miss they know and vice versa.  Don't share your grades and be nice to everyone!

this just about sums it up, IMO.
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MrDiggler

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Re: ADVICE for Incoming-1Ls
« Reply #16 on: January 29, 2009, 04:22:03 PM »
Find people like JD-Maybe and get their outlines.
Making your own is a waste of time - why recreate the wheel?
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mtbrider59

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Re: ADVICE for Incoming-1Ls
« Reply #17 on: January 29, 2009, 04:35:39 PM »
I'd have to agree with most of the posts, get ready to read a lot and make sure you're prepared for each class and engage in ACTIVE listening. At least weekly synthesize your weekly class notes and materials to your own outline. You should use Supplements exactly for that to supplement. Really what you need to do is develop your own system for what helps you learn, listen to advice here and elsewhere and try different things. Unfortunately, you won't really know how effective you've been until you make it through your first round of exams. The key is to remember that time is a scarce commodity and use it wisely. I stopped formal briefing after my second week as it just took too much time and instead developed my own systemm of book pencil briefing along with selected note taking, it was faster and more efficient- and just what I needed in order to follow the discussion in class

Thistle

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Re: ADVICE for Incoming-1Ls
« Reply #18 on: January 29, 2009, 04:46:46 PM »
First post sums it up well. But I just want to emphasis that briefing is the biggest waste of time you can engage in. Thanks.

meh, depends on the class.  I had a professor who didn't allow laptops in class, and his lessons were all structured around the one or two cases we'd be asked to read per class.  I found that the most efficient way to take and organize class notes was to brief the cases the night before, print them out, then take notes on the back of each brief.

especially as a 1L, briefing during the first semester helped me process the cases better and understand what it was I was supposed to be picking out of them.  I stopped briefing for two of my three classes at different points in the semester, but I didn't think it was a waste of time while I was doing it.



i had a professor who didnt allow laptops in class.  he was the most boring person on the planet and i never heard a word he said.

i spent the first hour of class doing the daily nyt crossword, and the second hour either doodling pictures of law students committing suicide or playing hangman with the girl next to me.

i bought the book but never took the plastic off.

i was top paper.


the moral is, your mileage may vary.  i havent read, briefed, or made outlines from scratch since second semester of 1L year.  as for outlines from upperclassmen, they have proven to be invaluable to whatever success i have had.
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