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Author Topic: The "wonderful" law school experience  (Read 1329 times)

cstewar2

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The "wonderful" law school experience
« on: January 15, 2009, 05:59:30 AM »
jklkjhk

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Re: The "wonderful" law school experience
« Reply #1 on: January 15, 2009, 09:40:06 AM »
Quote
If you have any issues in your personal life that may affect your ability to perform well in law school, you might want to think twice before wasting $1000s of your dollars and time.

I agree with this statement 100%.

My concern here is that you still aren't accepting your responsibility in the drama that played out.  "The rift was not my doing." First, what your roommate did took guts.  As a friend who has had to tell someone that they needed professional help to deal with their problems, it is really scary. (And you are not "playing the psychologist" in telling someone that they need to talk to a real psychologist.) You do it knowing that it jeopardizes your relationship with the person. Saying it in person is completely awkward, and a lot of people choose to do it in writing. While you may think Facebook message is condescending, you should be grateful that your roommate had the guts to let you know that you needed help in the first place. And it was likely her plea for help too... "I can't be your psychologist anymore!" It seems you unreasonably acted out against your roommate and caused a lot of the drama that you are now escaping.  Your personal problems had started to impact your roommate's lives; it is time for you to apologize to them so you can all move on. I also imagine that you are developing quite a lovely reputation at the law school. These people are your network.  You need to clear this up.

The kidney infection excuse is weak. I've had one too. There is no reason you can't study while recuperating, and that's the way the deans saw it too.  The cousin's tragic death is extraordinarily sad.  But I've had that happen too, unfortunately.  It should not have crippled you, and you should have been able to at least read within two weeks or so.  People all around the world go about their daily lives (even if morosely) after the deaths of someone they loved.

You have to own your own role in this.  You seem to think that your "personal problems" are external forces that are causing you these problems, but the problem is more in your internal reaction to the drama.  You create more.  The part that is broken is your reaction, and that's the part that you haven't even begun to fix.


Also, your thread title seems to indicate that your story is not atypical.  A lot of people like law school, do well (or don't, and still like it), make friends, and get good jobs.  It sounds like you were not ready to handle additional personal responsibility with your depression and personal problems, but I don't think that this is a common experience at all. (Or maybe it is? I just don't know very many people who follow stereotypes from Paper Chase.)

Stole Your Nose!

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Re: The "wonderful" law school experience
« Reply #2 on: January 23, 2009, 11:01:52 AM »
You can't post something publicly without expecting others to share their honest reactions to your story. You acknowledge that you were depressed, and I can guarantee that it was obvious to your roomies that you were depressed.  It is perfectly reasonable to suggest that someone who is depressed needs help, and it is also reasonably to suggest that someone who is dealing with a stressful situation (law school after a crappy first semester of grades) while grieving, needs help.  Your drama with your roommate is ridiculous on so many levels. If that's the kind of immature BS that was occupying your time, then you DEFINITELY need to talk to a counselor about prioritizing and dealing with other people. You also need to address the reputation you are likely getting as the psycho-chick in school.  Acknowledging that you needed help and getting it would probably be a good start.

Then there's the other potential problem with your grades. It's easy to blame it on motivation or something you can change, but a lot of people get bad grades because they are at the bottom of the deck at their particular school. If so, then you will need interpersonal skills and a network more than ever.

Sincerely, best of luck to you next semester, I hope you do get some help for the depression, and I hope you are able to do better.  However, you should start to develop a contingency plan for how to get a job if your grades still stay the same.

dbgirl

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Re: The "wonderful" law school experience
« Reply #3 on: January 23, 2009, 06:27:52 PM »
You also need to address the reputation you are likely getting as the psycho-chick in school.  Acknowledging that you needed help and getting it would probably be a good start. 

It seems that you're kicking the OP when she's down. Just because someone is depressed doesn't mean the whole school knows it.  That said, OP I don't see why you take offense by your roomie's suggestion that you get therapy. It's not as if roomie suggested you be locked up in a mental ward.

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Stole Your Nose!

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Re: The "wonderful" law school experience
« Reply #4 on: January 23, 2009, 07:00:28 PM »
Indelicately worded, sure.  But roommates who cause drama are talked about in the rumor mill.  I imagine that the roommates have had to explain to lots of people why they are no longer on speaking terms with OP.

vap

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Re: The "wonderful" law school experience
« Reply #5 on: January 23, 2009, 11:44:24 PM »
OP keeps talking about being a 1L at a third tier school and how this is a "law school experience."

It seems this story really has nothing to do with law school.