Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
;

Author Topic: Where to go if I don't get into a t-14  (Read 3463 times)

bt

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 428
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: Where to go if I don't get into a t-14
« Reply #10 on: January 08, 2009, 12:00:46 AM »
Much of the V100 is skewed towards the East Coast, so this data might be helpful.

http://lawfirmaddict.blogspot.com/

(scroll down to "Vault 100 Placement" for what I'm referring to)

Michigan is your better bet, but I imagine if you're top 1/3 at UT you have a good shot at east coast biglaw.  At Michigan it's more like top 1/2, though you may be able to be even lower than that.

UFBoldAsLove

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 1545
  • Go Gators.
    • View Profile
Re: Where to go if I don't get into a t-14
« Reply #11 on: January 08, 2009, 12:28:18 AM »
Michigan is a whole new ball game. In your situation, I would probably go with Mich - even at full sticker.
Vandy 1L... really?

woeisme

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 474
  • Untouchable
    • View Profile
    • LSN
Re: Where to go if I don't get into a t-14
« Reply #12 on: January 08, 2009, 01:09:18 AM »
Yeah, Michigan is going to have better biglaw options than Texas. Have you heard from Penn, Cornell, or Duke yet? They place well in NE big law. I'd consider those too, perhaps before MIchigan if you're set on moving east.
Cornell Law School Class of 2011 ... ftw.

hdg315

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 12
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: Where to go if I don't get into a t-14
« Reply #13 on: January 08, 2009, 05:48:23 PM »
Waiting to hear back from all three of those (penn, cornell, duke).  Also, waitlisted at both GULC and UVA.

AmyWaxFanClubPresident

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 308
    • View Profile
Re: Where to go if I don't get into a t-14
« Reply #14 on: January 08, 2009, 05:51:40 PM »
I'd take Penn over Mich (well, I did), and the current data being studied on xoxo backs this up.  No way I'd take Cornell or Duke over Mich for northeast placement.  Duke does pretty well, but Cornell isn't close.

Yeah, Michigan is going to have better biglaw options than Texas. Have you heard from Penn, Cornell, or Duke yet? They place well in NE big law. I'd consider those too, perhaps before MIchigan if you're set on moving east.
"This semester I will plunge you into the slough of despair, and when you are at your most desolate and are ready to give up, I will give you some light" - Professor Amy Wax

woeisme

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 474
  • Untouchable
    • View Profile
    • LSN
Re: Where to go if I don't get into a t-14
« Reply #15 on: January 08, 2009, 06:56:59 PM »
I'd take Penn over Mich (well, I did), and the current data being studied on xoxo backs this up.  No way I'd take Cornell or Duke over Mich for northeast placement.  Duke does pretty well, but Cornell isn't close.

Wait, notheast? Seriously. This is false, actually. Cornell places better than both Mich and Duke. Do your research.
Cornell Law School Class of 2011 ... ftw.

AmyWaxFanClubPresident

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 308
    • View Profile
Re: Where to go if I don't get into a t-14
« Reply #16 on: January 09, 2009, 11:02:43 AM »
I understand you have to defend your school, but are you seriously saying Cornell places better in NYC then Duke and Mich?  In addition to the date below, lawfirmaddict doesn't even back you up.  Where are you getting your data?

1. Yale (191)

2. Harvard (157)

3. Chicago (139)

4. Stanford (127)

5. Columbia (123)

6. NYU (88)

7. Penn (82)

8. Virginia (79)

9. GULC (71)

10. Boalt (68)

11. Michigan (65)

12. Duke (61)

13. Cornell (39)

14. NU (29)

I'd take Penn over Mich (well, I did), and the current data being studied on xoxo backs this up.  No way I'd take Cornell or Duke over Mich for northeast placement.  Duke does pretty well, but Cornell isn't close.

Wait, notheast? Seriously. This is false, actually. Cornell places better than both Mich and Duke. Do your research.

"This semester I will plunge you into the slough of despair, and when you are at your most desolate and are ready to give up, I will give you some light" - Professor Amy Wax

SavoyTruffleShuffle

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 146
    • View Profile
Re: Where to go if I don't get into a t-14
« Reply #17 on: January 09, 2009, 11:40:41 AM »
They may be getting their data from this NLJ report that's been posted a million times

http://pdfserver.amlaw.com/nlj/composite.pdf

If they are getting it from that, they're correct in saying Cornell places slightly better than Michigan, although Duke seems to defeat them both pretty handily

AmyWaxFanClubPresident

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 308
    • View Profile
Re: Where to go if I don't get into a t-14
« Reply #18 on: January 09, 2009, 11:45:12 AM »
But placement is not the % of grads that work somewhere due to self-selection. Mich sends a significant amount to DC & Cali, and some to Texas.  A Mich grad working at Wilmer in DC could have easily worked in NY (not to mention at a V5 firm).  On the other hand, Cornell's placement outside NY is abysmal.

They may be getting their data from this NLJ report that's been posted a million times

http://pdfserver.amlaw.com/nlj/composite.pdf

If they are getting it from that, they're correct in saying Cornell places slightly better than Michigan, although Duke seems to defeat them both pretty handily
"This semester I will plunge you into the slough of despair, and when you are at your most desolate and are ready to give up, I will give you some light" - Professor Amy Wax

SavoyTruffleShuffle

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 146
    • View Profile
Re: Where to go if I don't get into a t-14
« Reply #19 on: January 09, 2009, 11:57:56 AM »
Yeah, I don't actually know the methodology used for that particular chart. It's just an example of how someone could think Cornell places better than Michigan. It's essentially impossible to come up with a hypothetical "What if everyone who went to X Law School and Y Law School were competing with each other for jobs in Job Market Z." Regions of employment are (at least partially) self-selected. Even comparing national employment at elite firms leaves out those who could have gotten those jobs but opted for government or public interest or clerkships. I'd be happy to hear an explanation of a legitimate way to really measure/compare placement possibilities without the presence of all those uncertainties. If someone knows, that's info I'd love to have.