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Author Topic: Thread for LSAT 145- 149 scores  (Read 13983 times)

USAFVETERAN

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Thread for LSAT 145- 149 scores
« on: December 30, 2008, 07:58:53 PM »
Ok if you have clicked on this link then you have the same questions and feel the same way as other 145's-149's.  The feeling is gut wretching.  The one question is who the hell will let us throw the doors with these scores.  This thread is for you.  I will begin by stating that I have scored a 146 on the December 08 LSAT.  I have a 4.0 gpa, however this has not been calculated by LSAC or LDAS (whichever does the calculations).  I have several "perks" on my resume/personal statement to include military disabled veteran, small business owner, and co-founder of a non-profit.  I say all this to say that in the end my LSAT is a 146.  This is all that may really matter.  However, I have not been admitted or denied as of yet, so I do not know if my "perks" mean anything.  Speaking of admittance this thread is made for a point of reference for all of us in the lower 30 (percent that is).  As always, as I am sure you have heard, your gpa will be a variable as well as your personal statement etc.  With that said please feel free to post your local law school that will accept us for info purposes. 

In Texas if your score is between 145- 149 you will have a moderate chance at the following:

Texas Southern U.,
South Texas (slightly less),
Saint Mary (San Antonio),
Texas Weselyan (Ft. Worth). 

In the neighboring states of Texas you will have a moderate chance at

Loyola Uni in New Orleans
Oklahoma City Uni

USAFVETERAN

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Re: Thread for LSAT 145- 149 scores
« Reply #1 on: January 01, 2009, 03:22:50 AM »
To get a better idea of where you could go check out this link:
http://www.chiashu.com/schools

USAFVETERAN

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Re: Thread for LSAT 145- 149 scores
« Reply #2 on: January 01, 2009, 12:26:31 PM »
I could not find what you are referring to.  I have not registered as of yet.  Does this matter as far as having this function of LSAC operable?

USAFVETERAN

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Re: Thread for LSAT 145- 149 scores
« Reply #3 on: January 01, 2009, 03:16:31 PM »
Thanks.  This is good information.  More than likely I WILL be retaking the LSAT.  It is good to always know what your options are.  Thanks again.

Sambamc

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Re: Thread for LSAT 145- 149 scores
« Reply #4 on: January 02, 2009, 12:59:41 AM »
I just want to encourage all of these applicant's that I see who obviously excelled in their previous schooling and/or their performance in the work world not to let yourself be held back by a low LSAT score. Retake the test and go to a much better school.

USAFVETERAN

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Stole Your Nose!

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Re: Thread for LSAT 145- 149 scores
« Reply #6 on: January 19, 2009, 03:14:39 PM »
The reason the boards are so rankings-heavy is because the costs of a public law school aren't usually differentiated enough to make a major difference and the costs of a private law school also aren't significantly differentiated by rankings.  However, employment prospects are. 

Almost all of the deans of the major schools have criticized the USNews game, but they continue to play it because the top students often use them to decide where to go, and employers are more likely interview at top-ranked schools.

Also, some of those alternative factors the deans listed don't necessarily make a law program better; those are personal factors that to some people are an asset, to some they are neutral, and to some are actually negative. 

USAFVETERAN

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Re: Thread for LSAT 145- 149 scores
« Reply #7 on: January 19, 2009, 05:13:14 PM »
I put pre law students in three categories-
1.   Ambitious Rider- one who feverously studies the LSAT for the purpose of scoring well enough to get a full ride (hence Ambitious Rider).

2.   Chopped and Screwed- one who feverously studies the LSAT, yet did not get any scholarship money, and who WILL have debt after law school.  Probably ended up in a Tier 3 or 4.  This person has officially been chopped and screwed.

3.    Paid For, All 1ís- one who has his/her education paid for regardless of LSAT score, therefore need not factor in scholarships or debts.  Sees a law education for what it is, a law education, not a ranking or number.  Probably puts less emphasis on rank and more on getting the degree.  One who is probably less driven by money and more driven by passion.   One who knows that regardless of what school you attend it is ultimately up to you to make it, through networking and playing to natural strengths.

Probably the #3 person would wholly agree with the article written.

SavoyTruffleShuffle

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Re: Thread for LSAT 145- 149 scores
« Reply #8 on: January 19, 2009, 05:19:44 PM »
There are definitely more types than "feverish LSAT studiers" and "rich kids."

Stole Your Nose!

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Re: Thread for LSAT 145- 149 scores
« Reply #9 on: January 19, 2009, 07:02:45 PM »
Yeah, that post was just bizarre.  It's lovely that you put yourself in the category three, and think quite highly of yourself and your motivations, but it seems to me just a way of countering your crap LSAT test scores with a "oh, I didn't care about rankings anyway" and "but I've got passion!"

There are lots of wonderful things to gain from a legal education.  But it is professional school.  The goal of professional school is generally to get a job.  And some schools put you in a better position to do that. 

The outside factors don't have anything to do with aren't more likely to matter to people in your arbitrary category 3.  Religious affiliation is more likely to matter to someone who is deeply religious.  International connections are more likely to matter to someone who wants to do int'l law or study abroad. Racial or gender diversity are extraordinarily important for some people, and not for others.