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Author Topic: Entertainment law  (Read 1071 times)

Live Free or Die

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Entertainment law
« on: December 29, 2008, 10:41:06 PM »
I already posted this in another thread, but I'm toying with the idea of going into music industry law. Is there anyone who could talk about what exactly music industry lawyers do? I assume it has a lot to do with contracts and copyrights, but I want to hear what other people have to say. Additionally, I know LA schools like USC and UCLA are great for entertainment law, but are there good entertainment law schools on the east coast? Additionally, what are employment opportunities like on the east coast versus the west coast in the entertainment field? Thanks!

itzjulz

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Re: Entertainment law
« Reply #1 on: December 30, 2008, 12:55:04 AM »
Tom: See my post on your other thread for some basics :)

There are good schools for entertainment law on the east coast (New York, specifically): NYU, Columbia, Fordham, Cardozo.  If the school doesn't have a lot of courses specific to entertainment/media law, make sure they have strong transactional/contract course options - that's what's important :)

Also lots of firms and other in-house opportunities on the east coast.  Between positions at firms, you've also got networks like MTV, labels (Sony, among others), and plenty of other places where you're likely to find in-house lawyers (ASCAP, for example)
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Live Free or Die

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Re: Entertainment law
« Reply #2 on: December 30, 2008, 01:42:25 AM »
Tom: See my post on your other thread for some basics :)

There are good schools for entertainment law on the east coast (New York, specifically): NYU, Columbia, Fordham, Cardozo.  If the school doesn't have a lot of courses specific to entertainment/media law, make sure they have strong transactional/contract course options - that's what's important :)

Also lots of firms and other in-house opportunities on the east coast.  Between positions at firms, you've also got networks like MTV, labels (Sony, among others), and plenty of other places where you're likely to find in-house lawyers (ASCAP, for example)

Thanks a lot for the help - it is much appreciated  :)

Would my chances of getting an entertainment job be severely diminished if I went to a general T14 school like Duke, Cornell, or Georgetown that isn't really known for entertainment law? My apps have already been sent out, and I mostly just applied to T14 schools because I wasn't sure about any specialties (and I'm still not sure). I also don't anticipate an NYU or Columbia acceptance :(

itzjulz

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Re: Entertainment law
« Reply #3 on: December 30, 2008, 10:23:28 AM »
I don't think your chances at an entertainment law job would be killed by going to another T14 that doesn't specialize in it.  Look for solid IP and contracts curricula.  Your only disadvantage might be that entertainment firms might not recruit as much at those schools for internships or summer associates - That just means it might be more competitive for you, and you'll have to do some digging to find those jobs on your own.

I don't know *too* much about Duke, Cornell, and Georgetown, as I wasn't really considering them myself.  You might consider talking to someone from admissions and asking them what they recommend.  I got an honest answer from a rep at the Chicago Forum from one of the schools in the San Fran bay area (I don't remember which one), who told me their IP program is heavily geared towards patent law, because of their proximity to Silicon Valley and the computer industry there.  Good to know ahead of time, as I currently have no interest in the patent issues involving supercomputer microchips and whatnot.  In the other thread about this topic, one poster pointed out the importance of IP law - he's right, but it still pays to find out exactly what you're going to be learning.  When I was in undergrad in Detroit, a lot of the work in courses I took for my business minor ALL related to the auto industry, which I have no interest in.  Computer chips and poorly made cars - no thank you. :)
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