Law School Discussion

What Nobody Tells You About LS Applications -- But They Should

win200

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Re: What Nobody Tells You About LS Applications -- But They Should
« Reply #10 on: January 24, 2009, 07:24:03 PM »
This is probably a hopelessly naive question, but I've put the entirety of my energy into getting in to law school, and now that I've been accepted at at least one, I'm starting to become neurotic about getting a job AFTER law school. Of course this is an impossibly broad question, but what exactly DO firms tend to look for besides class ranking? I'm a DYNAMITE interviewer, but I'm just terrified of getting a J.D. and only being able to make $50,000. Just any thoughts on what one should do during law school (besides get good grades) to maximize employment potential would be great.

Re: What Nobody Tells You About LS Applications -- But They Should
« Reply #11 on: January 24, 2009, 08:05:21 PM »
This is probably a hopelessly naive question, but I've put the entirety of my energy into getting in to law school, and now that I've been accepted at at least one, I'm starting to become neurotic about getting a job AFTER law school. Of course this is an impossibly broad question, but what exactly DO firms tend to look for besides class ranking? I'm a DYNAMITE interviewer, but I'm just terrified of getting a J.D. and only being able to make $50,000. Just any thoughts on what one should do during law school (besides get good grades) to maximize employment potential would be great.

Where are you going to law school?

Nobody is a great interviewer.  They simply think they are, which makes them all the more arrogant.  The trick is to "click" with your interviewer, not wow them with huzzah.  If you were interviewing with some of the attorneys with which I've interviewed, too much zest would have been awkward and ding-worthy.

goaliechica

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Re: What Nobody Tells You About LS Applications -- But They Should
« Reply #12 on: January 24, 2009, 08:09:41 PM »
This is probably a hopelessly naive question, but I've put the entirety of my energy into getting in to law school, and now that I've been accepted at at least one, I'm starting to become neurotic about getting a job AFTER law school. Of course this is an impossibly broad question, but what exactly DO firms tend to look for besides class ranking? I'm a DYNAMITE interviewer, but I'm just terrified of getting a J.D. and only being able to make $50,000. Just any thoughts on what one should do during law school (besides get good grades) to maximize employment potential would be great.

Where are you going to law school?

Nobody is a great interviewer.  They simply think they are, which makes them all the more arrogant.  The trick is to "click" with your interviewer, not wow them with huzzah.  If you were interviewing with some of the attorneys with which I've interviewed, too much zest would have been awkward and ding-worthy.

Disagree. Being a good interviewer often means you know how to read people and respond accordingly, as well as just being generally personable and professional, not always being full of "zest," or something. And some people are definitely better at that than others.

Although I agree that it's kind of douchey to proclaim yourself to be a "DYNAMITE interviewer"  ::)

Miss P

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Re: What Nobody Tells You About LS Applications -- But They Should
« Reply #13 on: January 24, 2009, 08:24:33 PM »
Disagree. Being a good interviewer often means you know how to read people and respond accordingly, as well as just being generally personable and professional, not always being full of "zest," or something. And some people are definitely better at that than others.

Absolutely.

Re: What Nobody Tells You About LS Applications -- But They Should
« Reply #14 on: January 24, 2009, 08:43:03 PM »
Disagree. Being a good interviewer often means you know how to read people and respond accordingly, as well as just being generally personable and professional, not always being full of "zest," or something. And some people are definitely better at that than others.

Absolutely.

That's what I meant to say.  Thank you.

Re: What Nobody Tells You About LS Applications -- But They Should
« Reply #15 on: January 24, 2009, 08:58:47 PM »
so you are saying if you are in a T1 school and have a good resume and interview well you should be able to be just as competitive as someone from a T14 school come job time? Or, for someone with great WE and proven abilities at work the prestige fo a T14 may not be as necessary than someone with less on their resume? I don't really want to get a JD and take a pay cut afterwards. But not having to put up the T14 money to be able to make good money would be most awesome.

win200

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Re: What Nobody Tells You About LS Applications -- But They Should
« Reply #16 on: January 24, 2009, 10:30:03 PM »
This is probably a hopelessly naive question, but I've put the entirety of my energy into getting in to law school, and now that I've been accepted at at least one, I'm starting to become neurotic about getting a job AFTER law school. Of course this is an impossibly broad question, but what exactly DO firms tend to look for besides class ranking? I'm a DYNAMITE interviewer, but I'm just terrified of getting a J.D. and only being able to make $50,000. Just any thoughts on what one should do during law school (besides get good grades) to maximize employment potential would be great.

Where are you going to law school?

Nobody is a great interviewer.  They simply think they are, which makes them all the more arrogant.  The trick is to "click" with your interviewer, not wow them with huzzah.  If you were interviewing with some of the attorneys with which I've interviewed, too much zest would have been awkward and ding-worthy.

Disagree. Being a good interviewer often means you know how to read people and respond accordingly, as well as just being generally personable and professional, not always being full of "zest," or something. And some people are definitely better at that than others.

Although I agree that it's kind of douchey to proclaim yourself to be a "DYNAMITE interviewer"  ::)


Well, I am kinda douchey.   :P

I just tend to do well speaking extemporaneously in one-on-one situations like that. I can pivot easily off of difficult or unexpected questions, and I actually really enjoy interviewing, which I think helps.

win200

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Re: What Nobody Tells You About LS Applications -- But They Should
« Reply #17 on: January 24, 2009, 10:34:37 PM »
This is probably a hopelessly naive question, but I've put the entirety of my energy into getting in to law school, and now that I've been accepted at at least one, I'm starting to become neurotic about getting a job AFTER law school. Of course this is an impossibly broad question, but what exactly DO firms tend to look for besides class ranking? I'm a DYNAMITE interviewer, but I'm just terrified of getting a J.D. and only being able to make $50,000. Just any thoughts on what one should do during law school (besides get good grades) to maximize employment potential would be great.

Where are you going to law school?

Nobody is a great interviewer.  They simply think they are, which makes them all the more arrogant.  The trick is to "click" with your interviewer, not wow them with huzzah.  If you were interviewing with some of the attorneys with which I've interviewed, too much zest would have been awkward and ding-worthy.

I'm not sure where I'll be going yet. I kinda shortchanged myself on my first round of applications; I didn't realize how much ground a 173 can make up, so I've sent out some reach applications. Part of the reason I asked the question I did is I'm trying to gauge whether or not to go to a lower-ranked T1 school in the region I definitely want to practice in (Lewis & Clark), or, if all goes well, a much higher-ranked school like William & Mary or Fordham. I'm assuming, also, that if I get into a T14 school by some miracle I'd be nuts to pass it up in favor of L&C.