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Author Topic: Question regarding my practice LSAT score  (Read 1739 times)

unclechester

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Question regarding my practice LSAT score
« on: December 22, 2008, 02:27:39 AM »
I searched online about my current quandary and I haven't found anything helpful thus far.

Here is my question:

Within the past couple of months I have gained an interest in law. In October, my school offered a Kaplan sponsored practice LSAT event which I attended. Prior to taking the test, I had almost no idea what would be on it, including the "traps" of the exam and that certain questions would be harder than others which test takers should initially avoid and then retrace their steps to tackle the harder questions later on. I did not know this. I ended up receiving a 144 which I was very very upset about. However, I am optimistic that I can raise this. My question to you all is what sort of increase should I expect after studying a practice LSAT book. I am coming to you because I know that many of you have much more experience with the test than I do. Maybe you can help me? thanks.

jarvis batman mcdyess

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Re: Question regarding my practice LSAT score
« Reply #1 on: December 22, 2008, 05:42:07 AM »
i mean, i don't think there is a solid answer.  there are so many variables involved.

obviously that test is designed so you do bad (just throwing you in there having never seen the question types before, having never practiced timing implies probable failure on your part).  that way, they [any testing agency that does this] can better demonstrate the "benefit" that their service provides.

personally, i would throw that 144 out the window and after feeling moderately comfortable with the test, try taking it once more to get a better baseline score.

as for your question - i don't know what type of practice book you have, but trying to improve incrementally is not a bad idea (focus on improving one section before another depending on your weaknesses).  i think it is very possible for anyone to score in the 160s on this test if they prepare the right way, regardless of how low their starting score was.

i would at least expect to improve 10 points since you have so much room to move up, but i would set my target even higher to 15 or 20 points, then go from there.

DerekShiHarvard

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Re: Question regarding my practice LSAT score
« Reply #2 on: December 26, 2008, 09:15:24 PM »
Well, the Kaplan diagnostic means nothing. It is not a real LSAT. Disregard it and take one on your own.
Links:
PowerScore Bibles
Law School Numbers
LSAT Proctor DVD


The shadow proves the sunshine - press on fellow applicants!

senseless

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Re: Question regarding my practice LSAT score
« Reply #3 on: December 27, 2008, 03:27:24 AM »
I searched online about my current quandary and I haven't found anything helpful thus far.

Here is my question:

Within the past couple of months I have gained an interest in law. In October, my school offered a Kaplan sponsored practice LSAT event which I attended. Prior to taking the test, I had almost no idea what would be on it, including the "traps" of the exam and that certain questions would be harder than others which test takers should initially avoid and then retrace their steps to tackle the harder questions later on. I did not know this. I ended up receiving a 144 which I was very very upset about. However, I am optimistic that I can raise this. My question to you all is what sort of increase should I expect after studying a practice LSAT book. I am coming to you because I know that many of you have much more experience with the test than I do. Maybe you can help me? thanks.

Give yourself 2 years at an average of 15 hours/week to prepare for the LSAT. Once you get on track, adjust accordingly. If you feel comfortable before 2 years passes, take the LSAT when you know you are ready. Look at several different established techniques, developing your own in the process. It goes without saying that you should use nothing but real LSAT questions for your training, unless you really know what you're doing.

zippyandzap

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Re: Question regarding my practice LSAT score
« Reply #4 on: December 27, 2008, 10:34:41 AM »
I searched online about my current quandary and I haven't found anything helpful thus far.

Here is my question:

Within the past couple of months I have gained an interest in law. In October, my school offered a Kaplan sponsored practice LSAT event which I attended. Prior to taking the test, I had almost no idea what would be on it, including the "traps" of the exam and that certain questions would be harder than others which test takers should initially avoid and then retrace their steps to tackle the harder questions later on. I did not know this. I ended up receiving a 144 which I was very very upset about. However, I am optimistic that I can raise this. My question to you all is what sort of increase should I expect after studying a practice LSAT book. I am coming to you because I know that many of you have much more experience with the test than I do. Maybe you can help me? thanks.

Give yourself 2 years at an average of 15 hours/week to prepare for the LSAT. Once you get on track, adjust accordingly. If you feel comfortable before 2 years passes, take the LSAT when you know you are ready. Look at several different established techniques, developing your own in the process. It goes without saying that you should use nothing but real LSAT questions for your training, unless you really know what you're doing.

2 years for one test  :o
You can do half your UG in that time and later 2/3 of LS in 2 years.
Something doesn't smell right with this.


I studied about 7 hours per week for 6 weeks for the first one, and did 10 practice tests for the second one.  It depends on the person.

booyakasha45

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Re: Question regarding my practice LSAT score
« Reply #5 on: December 27, 2008, 03:34:12 PM »
I studied for 3 months over the summer and did 29 tests. The real thing was my 30th. 2 years seems excessive.

jobq48

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Re: Question regarding my practice LSAT score
« Reply #6 on: December 27, 2008, 08:33:13 PM »
I agree about the 2 years being excessive. It was by far not the smartest decision of my life, but I only really preped for the LSAT for 6 solid weeks and increased 11 points from my diagnositic. 2-3 months of some good studying and anyone that does it the right way should be close to the 160 range regardless of diagnostic score.

senseless

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Re: Question regarding my practice LSAT score
« Reply #7 on: December 28, 2008, 03:23:22 AM »
I agree about the 2 years being excessive. It was by far not the smartest decision of my life, but I only really preped for the LSAT for 6 solid weeks and increased 11 points from my diagnositic. 2-3 months of some good studying and anyone that does it the right way should be close to the 160 range regardless of diagnostic score.

2 years may certainly be excessive, especially if a score around 160 is desired. However, I was thinking more along the lines of 172-176. The choice of schools and scholarship money to be earned from such a high score is worth the extra study time. I'm not talking about getting a respectable score, I'm talking about getting an exceptional score.

I studied hard for 6 months, and I'm sure I could have gotten 10 points higher with another 6 months of study.

I searched online about my current quandary and I haven't found anything helpful thus far.

Here is my question:

Within the past couple of months I have gained an interest in law. In October, my school offered a Kaplan sponsored practice LSAT event which I attended. Prior to taking the test, I had almost no idea what would be on it, including the "traps" of the exam and that certain questions would be harder than others which test takers should initially avoid and then retrace their steps to tackle the harder questions later on. I did not know this. I ended up receiving a 144 which I was very very upset about. However, I am optimistic that I can raise this. My question to you all is what sort of increase should I expect after studying a practice LSAT book. I am coming to you because I know that many of you have much more experience with the test than I do. Maybe you can help me? thanks.

Give yourself 2 years at an average of 15 hours/week to prepare for the LSAT. Once you get on track, adjust accordingly. If you feel comfortable before 2 years passes, take the LSAT when you know you are ready. Look at several different established techniques, developing your own in the process. It goes without saying that you should use nothing but real LSAT questions for your training, unless you really know what you're doing.

2 years for one test  :o
You can do half your UG in that time and later 2/3 of LS in 2 years.
Something doesn't smell right with this.



The LSAT is potentially more important than your entire UG gpa. I realize it sounds asinine, but I stick to it. You don't just take the LSAT and then "forget" what you've learned; your LSAT training will help you, to a certain extent, with your law school studies and your future legal career. With that in mind, I think it's important to spend many months refining and eventually mastering your techniques for answering any and all types of LSAT questions with lightning speed. You may not necessarily want a 180, but you may like the idea of paying no tuition and possibly no living expenses for your legal education.