Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
;

Author Topic: Economy and law school admissions -- tougher?  (Read 7341 times)

AmyWaxFanClubPresident

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 308
    • View Profile
Re: Economy and law school admissions -- tougher?
« Reply #20 on: February 11, 2009, 07:50:35 PM »
I had a great day, it was a joke, but somewhat serious.

Blantant Obama Administration trolling.  Regulate the free-market of law schools apps, its not fair because people who really want to be lawyers have a "right," screw bankers.... I didn't realize change was coming this quick.  Jesus.

All I know is, recent college graduates, people whose career progression makes sense for law school and reapplicants from last year should get preference over any lamebag who has recently lost a high-paying Wall Street position and seems to just want to ride out the storm. I hope law schools are doing the responsible thing and really checking these applications for that, b/c it is going on. It's not fair to the applicants who are really into this and want to be attorneys. 

Personally, I would also love to see a cap on the number of law schools an applicant can apply to and the number of cycles an applicant can apply in. Maybe three years (max) in any five years, with a 12 school limit per year (that's fair, right?). Then we'll find out who really wants to be lawyers. And people would take more time, prep better for the LSAT (or whatever exam is instituted) and turn in higher quality applications.

Most of all, maybe the weak links (people who shouldn't go to law school or people applying for the wrong reasons) would get weeded out. Plus, the admissions committees would not be as overworked and could scrutinize each applicant better. It might also allow schools to interview applicants, something they would all love to do.

Wow, I thought it was off-topic and inane, but you came off as totally hostile and angry.

Bad day?
"This semester I will plunge you into the slough of despair, and when you are at your most desolate and are ready to give up, I will give you some light" - Professor Amy Wax

sheltron5000

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 1416
  • All weather operation. Batteries not included.
    • View Profile
Re: Economy and law school admissions -- tougher?
« Reply #21 on: February 11, 2009, 07:51:16 PM »
Sheltron I think your point is probably valid -- anecdotally I know law schools are expecting an increase in financial aid requests. I think it's mitigated by a couple of things:

--While applicants might be thinking more about the job market, they're still not probably thinking as realistically as they should

--There might be a tendency to assume/hope the job market will be better when current 0Ls are applying for jobs

Nonetheless, I think on the margin you're probably right, though I wouldn't expect a huge effect.

Hey, as long as it frees up ONE space for me, I don't care how big the effect is ;)
LSN

I'd love to join this LGBT club.  It's the Legos, Gobots, Barbies, and other Toys group, right?  I'll show up with an armful of toys.

sheltron5000

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 1416
  • All weather operation. Batteries not included.
    • View Profile
Re: Economy and law school admissions -- tougher?
« Reply #22 on: February 11, 2009, 07:52:37 PM »
I had a great day, it was a joke.

Blantant Obama Administration trolling.  Regulate the free-market of law schools apps, its not fair because people who really want to be lawyers have a "right," screw bankers.... I didn't realize change was coming this quick.  Jesus.

All I know is, recent college graduates, people whose career progression makes sense for law school and reapplicants from last year should get preference over any lamebag who has recently lost a high-paying Wall Street position and seems to just want to ride out the storm. I hope law schools are doing the responsible thing and really checking these applications for that, b/c it is going on. It's not fair to the applicants who are really into this and want to be attorneys. 

Personally, I would also love to see a cap on the number of law schools an applicant can apply to and the number of cycles an applicant can apply in. Maybe three years (max) in any five years, with a 12 school limit per year (that's fair, right?). Then we'll find out who really wants to be lawyers. And people would take more time, prep better for the LSAT (or whatever exam is instituted) and turn in higher quality applications.

Most of all, maybe the weak links (people who shouldn't go to law school or people applying for the wrong reasons) would get weeded out. Plus, the admissions committees would not be as overworked and could scrutinize each applicant better. It might also allow schools to interview applicants, something they would all love to do.

Wow, I thought it was off-topic and inane, but you came off as totally hostile and angry.

Bad day?

Oh, is this a thing between you and lawdog, or what? It really didn't sound like a joke.
LSN

I'd love to join this LGBT club.  It's the Legos, Gobots, Barbies, and other Toys group, right?  I'll show up with an armful of toys.

AmyWaxFanClubPresident

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 308
    • View Profile
Re: Economy and law school admissions -- tougher?
« Reply #23 on: February 11, 2009, 07:53:21 PM »
It was more a poke at Obama, hence the obama trolling comment.

I had a great day, it was a joke.

Blantant Obama Administration trolling.  Regulate the free-market of law schools apps, its not fair because people who really want to be lawyers have a "right," screw bankers.... I didn't realize change was coming this quick.  Jesus.

All I know is, recent college graduates, people whose career progression makes sense for law school and reapplicants from last year should get preference over any lamebag who has recently lost a high-paying Wall Street position and seems to just want to ride out the storm. I hope law schools are doing the responsible thing and really checking these applications for that, b/c it is going on. It's not fair to the applicants who are really into this and want to be attorneys. 

Personally, I would also love to see a cap on the number of law schools an applicant can apply to and the number of cycles an applicant can apply in. Maybe three years (max) in any five years, with a 12 school limit per year (that's fair, right?). Then we'll find out who really wants to be lawyers. And people would take more time, prep better for the LSAT (or whatever exam is instituted) and turn in higher quality applications.

Most of all, maybe the weak links (people who shouldn't go to law school or people applying for the wrong reasons) would get weeded out. Plus, the admissions committees would not be as overworked and could scrutinize each applicant better. It might also allow schools to interview applicants, something they would all love to do.

Wow, I thought it was off-topic and inane, but you came off as totally hostile and angry.

Bad day?

Oh, is this a thing between you and lawdog, or what? It really didn't sound like a joke.
"This semester I will plunge you into the slough of despair, and when you are at your most desolate and are ready to give up, I will give you some light" - Professor Amy Wax

sheltron5000

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 1416
  • All weather operation. Batteries not included.
    • View Profile
Re: Economy and law school admissions -- tougher?
« Reply #24 on: February 11, 2009, 07:54:26 PM »
It was more a poke at Obama, hence the obama trolling comment.

I had a great day, it was a joke.

Blantant Obama Administration trolling.  Regulate the free-market of law schools apps, its not fair because people who really want to be lawyers have a "right," screw bankers.... I didn't realize change was coming this quick.  Jesus.

All I know is, recent college graduates, people whose career progression makes sense for law school and reapplicants from last year should get preference over any lamebag who has recently lost a high-paying Wall Street position and seems to just want to ride out the storm. I hope law schools are doing the responsible thing and really checking these applications for that, b/c it is going on. It's not fair to the applicants who are really into this and want to be attorneys. 

Personally, I would also love to see a cap on the number of law schools an applicant can apply to and the number of cycles an applicant can apply in. Maybe three years (max) in any five years, with a 12 school limit per year (that's fair, right?). Then we'll find out who really wants to be lawyers. And people would take more time, prep better for the LSAT (or whatever exam is instituted) and turn in higher quality applications.

Most of all, maybe the weak links (people who shouldn't go to law school or people applying for the wrong reasons) would get weeded out. Plus, the admissions committees would not be as overworked and could scrutinize each applicant better. It might also allow schools to interview applicants, something they would all love to do.

Wow, I thought it was off-topic and inane, but you came off as totally hostile and angry.

Bad day?

Oh, is this a thing between you and lawdog, or what? It really didn't sound like a joke.

I get that, geithner espescially is beeing a bit of a lamo lately.
LSN

I'd love to join this LGBT club.  It's the Legos, Gobots, Barbies, and other Toys group, right?  I'll show up with an armful of toys.

LawDog3

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 690
    • View Profile
Re: Economy and law school admissions -- tougher?
« Reply #25 on: February 12, 2009, 03:08:49 AM »
Just for the record, people. I give everyone on this and similar sites the benefit of the doubt, ensofar as legitimacy is concerned. I actually called myself sticking up for OUR (as in yours and mine) territory, as we are students who actually love the law and want to be a part of this noble profession because of intrinsic as well as extrinsic motivation. If you think about the points I laid out, this law app thing has gotten out of control. I hear people saying "F_ck it...I'm applying to 40-50 schools."

I know a guy who applied to 100!! WTF?! Think about what that means. An adcom member was wasting time on that moron's app while he/she could have been reading yours or mine. A Testmasters coach told me that students are doing 30 schools on a regular basis nowadays; it's not even considered wierd. Just a decade ago, anything beyond 10 was considered excessive.

And it's often from the person who admittedly has either a really strong profile or an exceptionally weak one. That's a waste of time and money for everyone. People like that are driving up the (monetary and opportunity) costs for adcoms and students. Now add the corporate refugees who want a law degree just b/c they got a good LSAT score.

As for my other sentiments? I stand by them. If a person really wants to be a lawyer, great. If they are just doing this to take a seat away from a more deserving student - one who may not be as accomplished, but really wants to be a public servant - I hope they are rejected with the quicks! They don't deserve to go to law school. That's MY seat they're taking!! F_ck 'em! And if they are a corporate CEO? Not all are bad. I have no prejudice against them; I'm just a pragmatist, and I'm defending my turf. But if I were them, I'd tell me where to go, too. ;)

codyl

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 27
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: Economy and law school admissions -- tougher?
« Reply #26 on: February 12, 2009, 11:53:12 AM »
What's wrong with applying to a bunch of schools?  I applied to about 23 so far (debating whether to send in an app to Hawaii for the hell of it).  It's probably a good thing since i've been rejected at four and waitlisted at 1 so far.  The more schools you apply to, the better shot you have of at least getting into 1 or 2.

Liz Lemon

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 211
    • View Profile
Re: Economy and law school admissions -- tougher?
« Reply #27 on: February 12, 2009, 12:46:50 PM »
I'm thinking that people might consider the job market more seriously and find all those scholarships more tempting.

i'm sure a lot of people will jump down my throat for saying this, but i happen to agree with you.  the most job growth is expected to be in the public sector, and government jobs don't pay as well.  aside from the obvious benefit of having to take out fewer loans (if you can even get approved for a loan) when you take a scholarship from a decent school, you have the option of taking a public position without stressing over paying so much loan debt.  larger firms are being hit pretty hard by the economy.  clearly some graduates of certain schools will never have trouble finding a great job, there are fewer options and firms are definitely scaling back.

IMHO, i've always felt that going to a T14 school guarantees much better and higher paying job prospects but you are absolutely locked into those $140K jobs since you just took out that amount in loans.  however if that's the kind of job you want, then go for it.

LawDog3

  • Sr. Citizen
  • ****
  • Posts: 690
    • View Profile
Re: Economy and law school admissions -- tougher?
« Reply #28 on: February 16, 2009, 02:10:34 AM »
What's wrong with applying to a bunch of schools?  I applied to about 23 so far (debating whether to send in an app to Hawaii for the hell of it).  It's probably a good thing since i've been rejected at four and waitlisted at 1 so far.  The more schools you apply to, the better shot you have of at least getting into 1 or 2.

Absolutely nothing is wrong with applying to multiple schools, IF one is seriously interested in the LAW. And I wouldn't even propose a limit on applications if it were not for so many illegit applicants. I frown only on the people who are looking to hide in school for a few years.

In those cases, they should go get a masters or something, as opposed to taking valuable seats away from people who are really serious about this game, people who have dreamed about being lawyers since they were in high school. The fakers will go to law school just so they can hide, have law degrees to brag about and NOT practice law at all after two-three years.

That's no good for society; you have to want to fight the good fight, and build a long history of making the law degree pay off for the public AND yourself. And, for the record, I do consider corporations to be the public. There's nothing wrong with making money. 

imchuckbass58

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 15
    • View Profile
Re: Economy and law school admissions -- tougher?
« Reply #29 on: March 09, 2009, 02:53:36 PM »
So according to the NLJ, apps are up, but applicants aren't:

http://www.law.com/jsp/nlj/PubArticleNLJ.jsp?id=1202428824780

Also, 11% more people took the February LSAT, leading them to speculate next year will be a big year.