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Author Topic: T-14 students doing temp work?  (Read 6902 times)

sluglaw

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Re: T-14 students doing temp work?
« Reply #10 on: December 14, 2008, 01:17:36 AM »
Still, $35-40/hr isn't horrible pay...

the down side of temp work is not the pay, but rather the lack of status and opportunity for advancement.

From what I've read, temp work is also very inconsistent because it's project-oriented.  Some projects last weeks, others last months.  The hours are also, supposedly, inconsistent.

I always thought the inconsistency of temp work is almost a plus to it, you get a good job for a couple weeks and can then bail and go do whatever for a while, come back and work some more, get a lot of reading and lounging done while still making enough to cover minimal expenses, albeit without saving.

Of course, I'm just out of undergrad and still enjoying life (hitting up the libraries gyms and basketball courts) and didn't come out of law school with a JD and 6 figure debt.  I imagine if I'm still doing this then I'll have a somewhat different perspective on this lifestyle.

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Re: T-14 students doing temp work?
« Reply #11 on: December 14, 2008, 01:25:10 AM »
Resume breaks are a career killer.  A year without legal work and you might be SOL, from what I hear.

Matthies

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Re: T-14 students doing temp work?
« Reply #12 on: December 14, 2008, 10:44:46 AM »
I know a lawyer who just does clean water act stuff. Heís solo, but writes about it and get published on it a lot, so now he just does contract work on clean water act stuff only. He works from his house in Aspen, and does clean water act stuff from all over the county, mostly as an expert hired gun for firms with CWA cases (if you donít know the Clean Water Act is extremely complex and nebulous and far reaching, so it not something you can just pick up on and hope to beat the governmentís case). It took a few years of practicing, and writing whenever he could on the subject and getting published, but if you can find a nitch in a complex legal subject you can become and expert then just work when you want to. I would love to have a gig like that someday, work out of my house, be a recognized expert and have the work come to you, get paid to go talk at conferences and such.
*In clinical studies, Matthies was well tolerated, but women who are pregnant, nursing or might become pregnant should not take or handle Matthies due to a rare, but serious side effect called him having to make child support payments.

Dr. Balsenschaft

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Re: T-14 students doing temp work?
« Reply #13 on: December 14, 2008, 12:53:30 PM »
The only downside to that approach is when there's a sea change in that area of the law.  For instance, if the CWA all of a sudden became much more simple, the number of viable legal work in that area could take a huge drop.  Of course, I don't think a complex statutory and regulatory scheme like the CWA could become "simple" overnight so you could probably see the change coming and make adjustments in your practice as necessary.

nealric

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Re: T-14 students doing temp work?
« Reply #14 on: December 14, 2008, 01:29:16 PM »
Quote
The only downside to that approach is when there's a sea change in that area of the law.   

That's why I think it might be a good idea to have a second niche area on the side- just in case. I do think having a super-specialized niche in a complex area of law could be pretty nice. It also seems like it would be much easier to rise to the top. For example, there are many thousands of good M&A lawyers. Becoming the top M&A lawyer would require a lot of luck/talent and a monastic devotion to your work. But becoming the foremost expert on U.S.C. Section 1385123.223 subpart b clause 8 probably wouldn't be that hard if you devoted significant time to it and could be pretty lucrative if enough people have decent money riding on its interpretation.
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Matthies

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Re: T-14 students doing temp work?
« Reply #15 on: December 14, 2008, 01:56:59 PM »
The only downside to that approach is when there's a sea change in that area of the law.  For instance, if the CWA all of a sudden became much more simple, the number of viable legal work in that area could take a huge drop.  Of course, I don't think a complex statutory and regulatory scheme like the CWA could become "simple" overnight so you could probably see the change coming and make adjustments in your practice as necessary.

Yea, the key I think is becoming one of the foremost experts in a large but complex area of law. Because Iím environmentally focused NEPA, CWA, CAA come to mind, but I am sure there are others in other areas of law. To keep your credentials as an expert in addition to doing cases you would have to write about the subject as well and get published. If youíre doing that kind of research on the issue your likely to see some kind of sea change on the horizon, and because your already an expert in it you probably have idea on how that change in the law is going to affect the regulated people, so your still ahead of the curve even when/if the law changes and that would mean even more people would come to you for advice.
 
Being an expert on anything I think means life long learning and expecting the changes that come along. If thatís your only job itís not hard to stay on top of, or even be part of, chaining the law if youíre a recognized expert. I mean thatís what our professors do, teaching is secondary (to the school) to researching and writing on the subject of their expertise. I mean if you do a search for clean water act law review articles this guys name comes up like every five, he is listed as an author of a bunch of lawyers guides to the CWA. He just keeps abreast of the legal issues, writes papers on the changes and get them published then parlays that expertise into working on cases for other firms.

I know another lawyer who just does endangered species act listing petitions. Thatís all, sheís done like over 100. The pays not that great up front because its public interest, but she wants to work from home and raise her kids, so its good for her she can do everything she needs to do from her home office and be there as a stay at home mom while still keeping her legal skills and getting some $. Environmental organizations approach her with an idea to list a species, she writes up the listing petition with all the legal requirements, and arguments for listing and they add the science then she submits it. She does sliding fee depending on how much money the origination has (or how much they raised from like a ďsave the spotted mouseĒ campaign).

Where she really makes her money is if the agency does not rule on the issue in 90 days or the ruling is arbitrary or capacious you can sue, and the statute includes an attorney fee provision so every 90 days if the agency you got a new suit, and most settle out of court so you get your fees. The animals looses most of the time, but you at least get your fees (including the fee for the listing petition). Its not steady income, but comes in lumps when you get your fees.

Iíve actually written a listing petition, and its not that much work if you know the law and the arguments to make.
*In clinical studies, Matthies was well tolerated, but women who are pregnant, nursing or might become pregnant should not take or handle Matthies due to a rare, but serious side effect called him having to make child support payments.

Matthies

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Re: T-14 students doing temp work?
« Reply #16 on: December 14, 2008, 02:55:41 PM »
You guys are depressing me! 

why?  you have a job.

It's still sort of a downer thread though. 

well, that's most of the legal industry life.

fixt
*In clinical studies, Matthies was well tolerated, but women who are pregnant, nursing or might become pregnant should not take or handle Matthies due to a rare, but serious side effect called him having to make child support payments.

linquest

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Re: T-14 students doing temp work?
« Reply #17 on: February 05, 2009, 03:42:21 PM »
If so, where did they go wrong? Other then going to law school in the first place...

Poor people skills, perhaps they're horrifically bad at interviewing.
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