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Live Free or Die

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Questions for musicians in law school
« on: December 04, 2008, 02:40:39 AM »
Hey, I just had a few questions about being a musician in law school. I've played music for most of my life (trumpet), and for a lot of that time it has been central to my extracurricular life and my major source of income. I realize the workload in law school is crazy and that I will have less time, but do current law school student musicians still find time to practice and perform? Law school is definitely something that I want to do, but I really can't see myself giving up music because I don't even remember what it was like to not be a musician. At the same time, law-specific extracurriculars become fairly important, so it will involve a trade-off between spending free time on those and on music. A bit of a random post, but I'd appreciate any input people have. Thanks!

Blue08

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Re: Questions for musicians in law school
« Reply #1 on: December 04, 2008, 08:15:18 AM »
I have no idea, but if you decide to go to Michigan we should definitely try to play together!

observationalist

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Re: Questions for musicians in law school
« Reply #2 on: December 04, 2008, 10:47:42 AM »
Hey, I just had a few questions about being a musician in law school. I've played music for most of my life (trumpet), and for a lot of that time it has been central to my extracurricular life and my major source of income. I realize the workload in law school is crazy and that I will have less time, but do current law school student musicians still find time to practice and perform? Law school is definitely something that I want to do, but I really can't see myself giving up music because I don't even remember what it was like to not be a musician. At the same time, law-specific extracurriculars become fairly important, so it will involve a trade-off between spending free time on those and on music. A bit of a random post, but I'd appreciate any input people have. Thanks!

Vanderbilt has a student band that rehearses and plays at school events and outside parties, an a capella group that meets once a week and performs a few times a year, and there's a few professional musicians spread out among the classes.  I think it's a Nashville thing, but we definitely go out to a lot of shows.... nothing's better on a Sunday night than finishing up studying and heading over to Bluebird for writers' night.  I usually practice an hour or two a day but it'll be at least another year before I'll feel comfortable playing in this city. Musicians in Nashville are good... very good.  Last year Taylor Swift's fiddler came in to talk about applying but then decided not to... there's still a glimmer of hope that she'll come around and realize how much fun law school is compared to touring around the country with one of the most famous country singers in the business.

er...
Vanderbilt University Law School Class of '10

itzjulz

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Re: Questions for musicians in law school
« Reply #3 on: December 04, 2008, 12:23:24 PM »
As another law school hopeful with a music degree (Music Business degree, I'm a decent vocalist but by no means good enough to make a career out of it), This thread jumped out at me.

Are any/all of you working towards working in the entertainment/media law fields?  I'm applying soon, and working on my personal statement for applications.  I'm leaning towards a statement about how my experiences so far in music and the music industry have led to my interest in entertainment law (I currently work for a live music production/booking company, and previously interned for a prominent entertainment attorney/artist manager, and the Grammys), and I'm curious if anyone else has had success with a statement similar to mine.

Blue08: Congrats on UM!  Depending on my LSAT, Michigan may be in the cards for me too.  Maybe I'm jaded - I would have gone to UM for undergrad had it not been a money issue.  Instead I went to Wayne State on a full ride.  Still bleeding maize and blue after all these years (despite this year's football team - ouch!) Their music program is fantastic, so I'm sure you won't have a problem finding some folks to jam with!
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observationalist

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Re: Questions for musicians in law school
« Reply #4 on: December 04, 2008, 01:33:26 PM »
As another law school hopeful with a music degree (Music Business degree, I'm a decent vocalist but by no means good enough to make a career out of it), This thread jumped out at me.

Are any/all of you working towards working in the entertainment/media law fields?  I'm applying soon, and working on my personal statement for applications.  I'm leaning towards a statement about how my experiences so far in music and the music industry have led to my interest in entertainment law (I currently work for a live music production/booking company, and previously interned for a prominent entertainment attorney/artist manager, and the Grammys), and I'm curious if anyone else has had success with a statement similar to mine.

Blue08: Congrats on UM!  Depending on my LSAT, Michigan may be in the cards for me too.  Maybe I'm jaded - I would have gone to UM for undergrad had it not been a money issue.  Instead I went to Wayne State on a full ride.  Still bleeding maize and blue after all these years (despite this year's football team - ouch!) Their music program is fantastic, so I'm sure you won't have a problem finding some folks to jam with!

I'm not, but I'm really only an aspiring musician so my opinion doesn't count much.  We do have a good number in my class who came here for entertainment & technology law.  The TELP program funds a lot of the Entertainment & Sports Law Society events and there's a lot of networking opportunities through that and through the Nashville music scene in general.  And for entertainment law, networking = almost the only way to get your foot in the door.  If you can start networking while still in law school you're in good shape, but it sounds like you've already got at least one foot in so you could probably use that to your advantage regardless of where you go for school.
Vanderbilt University Law School Class of '10

Live Free or Die

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Re: Questions for musicians in law school
« Reply #5 on: December 04, 2008, 01:54:25 PM »
I have no idea, but if you decide to go to Michigan we should definitely try to play together!

Yeah, Michigan is definitely a top choice for me, though Vanderbilt is also appealing because of Nashville. I'll have to wait and see if my cycle decides for me.

Live Free or Die

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Re: Questions for musicians in law school
« Reply #6 on: December 04, 2008, 02:55:57 PM »
Also, just curious, is Vanderbilt a good school for entertainment law?

Blue08

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Re: Questions for musicians in law school
« Reply #7 on: December 04, 2008, 03:15:16 PM »
As another law school hopeful with a music degree (Music Business degree, I'm a decent vocalist but by no means good enough to make a career out of it), This thread jumped out at me.

Are any/all of you working towards working in the entertainment/media law fields?  I'm applying soon, and working on my personal statement for applications.  I'm leaning towards a statement about how my experiences so far in music and the music industry have led to my interest in entertainment law (I currently work for a live music production/booking company, and previously interned for a prominent entertainment attorney/artist manager, and the Grammys), and I'm curious if anyone else has had success with a statement similar to mine.

Blue08: Congrats on UM!  Depending on my LSAT, Michigan may be in the cards for me too.  Maybe I'm jaded - I would have gone to UM for undergrad had it not been a money issue.  Instead I went to Wayne State on a full ride.  Still bleeding maize and blue after all these years (despite this year's football team - ouch!) Their music program is fantastic, so I'm sure you won't have a problem finding some folks to jam with!

Yea, man - with you being in state I bet anything above a 166 gets you straight in the door at Michigan, esp. with your solid gpa. If you get accepted drop me a line!

itzjulz

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Re: Questions for musicians in law school
« Reply #8 on: December 04, 2008, 03:36:33 PM »


Yea, man - with you being in state I bet anything above a 166 gets you straight in the door at Michigan, esp. with your solid gpa. If you get accepted drop me a line!

Will do!.  Ahhh here's hoping I can repeat my practice test results on Saturday. I also *might* have a LOR from an adjunct faculty at the law school, but I'm not counting my chickens before they're hatched! (Wow, I sound like my grandmother there)
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observationalist

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Re: Questions for musicians in law school
« Reply #9 on: December 04, 2008, 03:56:44 PM »
Also, just curious, is Vanderbilt a good school for entertainment law?

Yeah, I mean the cities that own the entertainment business are LA, NY and Nashville.  These are the markets where students should be looking at if they're serious about practicing entertainment law.  

At Vandy, you have the following resources at your disposal, with the added benefit that we're the only school in the region with relationships to the music industry here (so your access to them as a student is direct):

-A very well-funded Entertainment and Sports Law Society (ESLS). Funded by TELP, with a focus on bringing in copyright/patent lawyers in the entertainment biz, and agents in the sports biz.  Weekly speakers from around the country are flown in to talk with students and help you plan for your careers.  Students are directly in charge of recruiting speakers beginning as 1Ls, so your involvement in the industry begins as soon as you join ESLS.  I was in it last year as a 1L until I decided I wanted to focus more on environmental/regulatory law.

-Tennessee Volunteer Lawyers for the Arts.  A non-profit in town started by a Vandy JD grad straight out of law school a few years back. Modeled on New York Volunteer Lawyers for the Arts.  Students intern there learning the business (primarily how to help new artists protect their work product, which is a great skill to develop while you're still in school).  Our Alumni Golf Tourny is put on each fall by ESLS to raise funds for TNVLA and raise awareness about their work among our alums.

-IP Boutiques. There are a few here in town (from which attorneys come as part of the ESLS speakers) and we've got a good relationship with the ones up in NY.  They come down every year for OCI, and the number of internships you can set up while you're here will help distinguish yourself for them if that's where you're looking to work.  IP/Patent law is one of the best routes towards developing a practice in entertainment law, so much of the focus here is on connecting the entertainment and ip programs as much as possible.  I don't know what our relationship is with firms in LA but we bring in boutiques from there as well.

-ASCAP, SESEC, SonyBMI.  They're all here and have a working relationship with Professors Helfer, Hetcher and Gervais.  Opportunities to work with them are available for those interested in approaching the profs.

-Gervais himself:  http://www.commonlaw.uottawa.ca/index.php?option=com_contact&task=view&contact_id=67&Itemid=286&lang=en
 The administration successfully recruited him after bringing him down for the WIPO conference Helfer coordinated last fall, which I skipped classes to attend because it was so amazing. (If you go way back to my posts from last year I think I documented what the conference was like.)  I don't know much about how they convince top scholars to come here, but they're good at it.  It has something to do with the way they've redesigned the curriculum into Programs... respected academics can come here, get tenure, run their programs as they see fit and engage in interdisciplinary scholarship. This happens especially with the Enviro program but I don't know how it works for the others.  We've got great directors of Environmental, Regulatory, International and IP, and none of them are going anywhere anytime soon.  I'd imagine the weather, cost of living and quality of life probably help convince them to stay here as well.

These are what I know about having tried to be a voice for the school over the last year on the boards.  As more people start jumping on (especially the 1Ls), I'll probably be stopping with these epic posts.  For direct knowledge outside of these opportunities (like where grads go afterwards), I'd have to put you in touch w/ some of my classmates or alums.  You should feel free to contact any alums you can find through martindale-hubbell or other means as well.  That goes for all the schools you're considering, including Michigan... might as well start networking with the alumni base as soon as you can if this is what you know you want to do down the road. G'luck.
Vanderbilt University Law School Class of '10