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Author Topic: 1L Work Load @ T14 vs. 25-75  (Read 6047 times)

Slumdog Lovebutton

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Re: 1L Work Load @ T14 vs. 25-75
« Reply #40 on: December 06, 2008, 10:35:54 AM »
Obviously except for the Gunnin' T25 where every night you literally have to study until 11:30, no internet or chit chat allowed, and then to be permitted to leave the library you have to ritually rip out and eat someone's heart.

LOL.  Story of my life.
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nealric

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Re: 1L Work Load @ T14 vs. 25-75
« Reply #41 on: December 06, 2008, 10:56:15 AM »
Anyone ever seen the movie Battle Royal?

The plot is that a bunch of middle school students are abducted, placed on a remote island, and forced to fight to the last one standing. Law school is kind of like that, but with older kids  :)
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Miss P

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Re: 1L Work Load @ T14 vs. 25-75
« Reply #42 on: December 06, 2008, 11:26:20 AM »
All I do is the reading and a little outline adjusting (of a carefully selected outline) at the end of the semester.  I am quite lazy.  Still, even just thinking about five or six classes sometimes makes my head spin.  Maybe it's just my withered old brain.
That's cool how you referenced a case.

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,.,.,.;.,.,.

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Re: 1L Work Load @ T14 vs. 25-75
« Reply #43 on: December 06, 2008, 11:30:32 AM »
Can't.  Force.  Myself.  To.  Finish.  Practice.  Test.

<-- too many practice tests in one week.  I feel like I haven't stopped typing arguments and counter-arguments since last Saturday.  Even when I talk to people, I'm tempted to say things like:

"You could argue that we would go to Subway.  Subway is three blocks away, and we place a premium on efficiency.  Also, Subway traditionally has the $5 footlong, and that's likely to be tempting for us as the plaintiff -- I mean, law students.  (Subway v. Law Students).

Conversely, Subway is traditionally not very nutrient-heavy because the defendant gets the Philly Steak Sandwich that is totally overpriced at $7.50.  Plaintiff could make a valid counter-argument that they will not buy anything beyond the $5 footlong, but the court is unlikely to recognize this precedent."

saradsun

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Re: 1L Work Load @ T14 vs. 25-75
« Reply #44 on: December 06, 2008, 09:32:47 PM »
hugs my 3 doctrinal class, plus pass/fail LRW.


nealric

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Re: 1L Work Load @ T14 vs. 25-75
« Reply #45 on: December 06, 2008, 09:46:51 PM »
Quote
<-- too many practice tests in one week.  I feel like I haven't stopped typing arguments and counter-arguments since last Saturday.  Even when I talk to people, I'm tempted to say things like:

"You could argue that we would go to Subway.  Subway is three blocks away, and we place a premium on efficiency.  Also, Subway traditionally has the $5 footlong, and that's likely to be tempting for us as the plaintiff -- I mean, law students.  (Subway v. Law Students).

Conversely, Subway is traditionally not very nutrient-heavy because the defendant gets the Philly Steak Sandwich that is totally overpriced at $7.50.  Plaintiff could make a valid counter-argument that they will not buy anything beyond the $5 footlong, but the court is unlikely to recognize this precedent."

A word of advice. Don't get too hung up with arguing both sides of a case on exams. It can be importaint to show you understand where there is ambiguity, but if you are not careful it can actually obscure your showing understanding of an issue.
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greenie

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Re: 1L Work Load @ T14 vs. 25-75
« Reply #46 on: December 06, 2008, 09:50:36 PM »
I'm at GW and :
first semester - civpro1 (3 cr), contracts1 (3 cr), torts (4 cr), and crim (3 cr) + lrw (2 cr).
second semester - civpro2 (3 cr), contracts 2 (3cr), property (4 cr), conlaw (3 cr) + advocacy (2 cr)

this is the first year lrw is graded at GW and it's awful.

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Re: 1L Work Load @ T14 vs. 25-75
« Reply #47 on: December 06, 2008, 09:54:48 PM »
Quote
<-- too many practice tests in one week.  I feel like I haven't stopped typing arguments and counter-arguments since last Saturday.  Even when I talk to people, I'm tempted to say things like:

"You could argue that we would go to Subway.  Subway is three blocks away, and we place a premium on efficiency.  Also, Subway traditionally has the $5 footlong, and that's likely to be tempting for us as the plaintiff -- I mean, law students.  (Subway v. Law Students).

Conversely, Subway is traditionally not very nutrient-heavy because the defendant gets the Philly Steak Sandwich that is totally overpriced at $7.50.  Plaintiff could make a valid counter-argument that they will not buy anything beyond the $5 footlong, but the court is unlikely to recognize this precedent."

A word of advice. Don't get too hung up with arguing both sides of a case on exams. It can be importaint to show you understand where there is ambiguity, but if you are not careful it can actually obscure your showing understanding of an issue.

Could you please elaborate?  Periodically, I sum something up in a sentence when it's obvious (e.g., the statute of limitations is fine because she filed the case within a year), but, usually, I argue both sides when I get to an issue.

greenie

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Re: 1L Work Load @ T14 vs. 25-75
« Reply #48 on: December 06, 2008, 09:56:55 PM »
Quote
<-- too many practice tests in one week.  I feel like I haven't stopped typing arguments and counter-arguments since last Saturday.  Even when I talk to people, I'm tempted to say things like:

"You could argue that we would go to Subway.  Subway is three blocks away, and we place a premium on efficiency.  Also, Subway traditionally has the $5 footlong, and that's likely to be tempting for us as the plaintiff -- I mean, law students.  (Subway v. Law Students).

Conversely, Subway is traditionally not very nutrient-heavy because the defendant gets the Philly Steak Sandwich that is totally overpriced at $7.50.  Plaintiff could make a valid counter-argument that they will not buy anything beyond the $5 footlong, but the court is unlikely to recognize this precedent."

A word of advice. Don't get too hung up with arguing both sides of a case on exams. It can be importaint to show you understand where there is ambiguity, but if you are not careful it can actually obscure your showing understanding of an issue.

Could you please elaborate?  Periodically, I sum something up in a sentence when it's obvious (e.g., the statute of limitations is fine because she filed the case within a year), but, usually, I argue both sides when I get to an issue.

 my professors told me specifically what to do on their exams so listen to your professor above all.

nealric

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Re: 1L Work Load @ T14 vs. 25-75
« Reply #49 on: December 06, 2008, 10:30:29 PM »
Quote

Could you please elaborate?  Periodically, I sum something up in a sentence when it's obvious (e.g., the statute of limitations is fine because she filed the case within a year), but, usually, I argue both sides when I get to an issue.

If there is a clear opposing argument, you should address it after fully explaining the relevant law. What you should not do is immediately launch into a "ping-pong" back and forth discussion immediately after spotting the issue.

 Also, be careful about giving lengthy treatment to an essentially spurious argument. If the opposing argument is weak (but needs to be mentioned), say so and say why but don't dwell on it. Some profs will ask you to play a role (i.e. you are clerking for judge XYZ)- the role can dictate how much you want to play both sides. In any event, the main point of exams is not to show you can argue both sides, it is to show you can understand and apply the law. 


You may be doing just fine, your post just seemed to imply that your main focus in your practice exams was arguing both sides.
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