Law School Discussion

If I get into to my ED school, how soon must I withdraw my other applications?

bt

  • ****
  • 405
    • View Profile
    • Email
Haha I mean I've given you the best argument I can to say that it wouldn't be "immoral" (or wrong) to keep your apps in at schools after you get in ED at a school.  Ultimately, it's your decision.  As far as how schools will feel about it, a week is not very long and unless you get a phone call it would be very easy to claim that you didn't check your mail/email that week.  Since Columbia gives ED decisions by mail (I believe) you'll be fine to hold your app in at other schools for a week or so.  But again, it's not really right, unless you want to try to make the financial aid argument.

this is the most god-damndest ass-backwards line or ethical thinking i believe i've ever encountered.  really, it's just childish.  as far as i can tell (i've only read it twice) it goes something like this:  "okay, it's not really wrong to not do something which you said you would do, as long as you lie well enough for them not to know that you didn't do it."  this is freakin' retarded.  no wonder there's such a massive amount of disrespect for lawyers and the profession in general...  people who find this type of logic okay (i'm gonna do what i want, right and wrong be damned) have something coming to them... eventually you will make a mistake with your cover-up lies, and this kind of decision making will come back to haunt you at some point.

for society's sake, i hope it's sooner rather than later, when other people's vitality is at stake...

FWIW, schools do allow people to get out of ED contracts if they cannot afford to go.  That's all I'm working with.  And I never said it would be something 'right' to do.  I applied ED to a school and if I get in, I will withdraw my applications as soon as I can.  But if one was wanting to try and justify not immediately withdrawing their apps after getting into a school ED, those are the best arguments I can think of.

Honestly, if that line of reasoning is that offensive to you, you're going to hate the law.

Navlaw

  • ****
  • 378
    • AOL Instant Messenger - merspice18
    • View Profile
    • LSN
Haha I mean I've given you the best argument I can to say that it wouldn't be "immoral" (or wrong) to keep your apps in at schools after you get in ED at a school.  Ultimately, it's your decision.  As far as how schools will feel about it, a week is not very long and unless you get a phone call it would be very easy to claim that you didn't check your mail/email that week.  Since Columbia gives ED decisions by mail (I believe) you'll be fine to hold your app in at other schools for a week or so.  But again, it's not really right, unless you want to try to make the financial aid argument.

this is the most god-damndest ass-backwards line or ethical thinking i believe i've ever encountered.  really, it's just childish.  as far as i can tell (i've only read it twice) it goes something like this:  "okay, it's not really wrong to not do something which you said you would do, as long as you lie well enough for them not to know that you didn't do it."  this is freakin' retarded.  no wonder there's such a massive amount of disrespect for lawyers and the profession in general...  people who find this type of logic okay (i'm gonna do what i want, right and wrong be damned) have something coming to them... eventually you will make a mistake with your cover-up lies, and this kind of decision making will come back to haunt you at some point.

for society's sake, i hope it's sooner rather than later, when other people's vitality is at stake...

FWIW, schools do allow people to get out of ED contracts if they cannot afford to go.  That's all I'm working with.  And I never said it would be something 'right' to do.  I applied ED to a school and if I get in, I will withdraw my applications as soon as I can.  But if one was wanting to try and justify not immediately withdrawing their apps after getting into a school ED, those are the best arguments I can think of.

Honestly, if that line of reasoning is that offensive to you, you're going to hate the law.

While they do let people out if they can't afford it I don't think they will let you go to another school. I would think you are pretty much done for that cycle.

Haha I mean I've given you the best argument I can to say that it wouldn't be "immoral" (or wrong) to keep your apps in at schools after you get in ED at a school.  Ultimately, it's your decision.  As far as how schools will feel about it, a week is not very long and unless you get a phone call it would be very easy to claim that you didn't check your mail/email that week.  Since Columbia gives ED decisions by mail (I believe) you'll be fine to hold your app in at other schools for a week or so.  But again, it's not really right, unless you want to try to make the financial aid argument.

this is the most god-damndest ass-backwards line or ethical thinking i believe i've ever encountered.  really, it's just childish.  as far as i can tell (i've only read it twice) it goes something like this:  "okay, it's not really wrong to not do something which you said you would do, as long as you lie well enough for them not to know that you didn't do it."  this is freakin' retarded.  no wonder there's such a massive amount of disrespect for lawyers and the profession in general...  people who find this type of logic okay (i'm gonna do what i want, right and wrong be damned) have something coming to them... eventually you will make a mistake with your cover-up lies, and this kind of decision making will come back to haunt you at some point.

for society's sake, i hope it's sooner rather than later, when other people's vitality is at stake...

FWIW, schools do allow people to get out of ED contracts if they cannot afford to go.  That's all I'm working with.  And I never said it would be something 'right' to do.  I applied ED to a school and if I get in, I will withdraw my applications as soon as I can.  But if one was wanting to try and justify not immediately withdrawing their apps after getting into a school ED, those are the best arguments I can think of.

Honestly, if that line of reasoning is that offensive to you, you're going to hate the law.

the way i see it, i'm going to love the law because i'll learn how to prohibit people from making their own interpretation of "IMMEDIATELY" fit what they swore they would do.  for you to suggest that your flawed and immoral reasoning is what "legal reasoning" is, i find laughable.

If you wanted to collect acceptances, you shouldn't have applied ED. The argument that you only want to wait a week is just stupid - what exactly makes you think you'll hear from your other schools in a week? If you want to find out if you're "Harvard material," withdraw your ED agreement. If not, suck it up and "deal" with the fact that you might be going to Columbia (what a horror!) As a wise person said elsewhere, how is it that you don't you understand what the "immediately" means in your contract?

ion: I <3 <3b  :D

bt

  • ****
  • 405
    • View Profile
    • Email
Haha I mean I've given you the best argument I can to say that it wouldn't be "immoral" (or wrong) to keep your apps in at schools after you get in ED at a school.  Ultimately, it's your decision.  As far as how schools will feel about it, a week is not very long and unless you get a phone call it would be very easy to claim that you didn't check your mail/email that week.  Since Columbia gives ED decisions by mail (I believe) you'll be fine to hold your app in at other schools for a week or so.  But again, it's not really right, unless you want to try to make the financial aid argument.

this is the most god-damndest ass-backwards line or ethical thinking i believe i've ever encountered.  really, it's just childish.  as far as i can tell (i've only read it twice) it goes something like this:  "okay, it's not really wrong to not do something which you said you would do, as long as you lie well enough for them not to know that you didn't do it."  this is freakin' retarded.  no wonder there's such a massive amount of disrespect for lawyers and the profession in general...  people who find this type of logic okay (i'm gonna do what i want, right and wrong be damned) have something coming to them... eventually you will make a mistake with your cover-up lies, and this kind of decision making will come back to haunt you at some point.

for society's sake, i hope it's sooner rather than later, when other people's vitality is at stake...

FWIW, schools do allow people to get out of ED contracts if they cannot afford to go.  That's all I'm working with.  And I never said it would be something 'right' to do.  I applied ED to a school and if I get in, I will withdraw my applications as soon as I can.  But if one was wanting to try and justify not immediately withdrawing their apps after getting into a school ED, those are the best arguments I can think of.

Honestly, if that line of reasoning is that offensive to you, you're going to hate the law.

the way i see it, i'm going to love the law because i'll learn how to prohibit people from making their own interpretation of "IMMEDIATELY" fit what they swore they would do.  for you to suggest that your flawed and immoral reasoning is what "legal reasoning" is, i find laughable.

Well, have fun with that and good luck!   ;D


ClashCityRocker

  • ***
  • 49
  • know your rights
    • View Profile
    • LSN Profile
Why don't you read the contract that you signed?  What does it say? [/quote]

It says, "Successful Early Decision candidates may not initiate any new law school applications and must withdraw other applications once notified of their Columbia acceptance in December.  Failure to honor these commitments will result in Columbia revoking its offer of admission."

My question is pretty simple: Columbia Law does not give a time frame for the withdrawal process. My question is, would it be an unethical breech of the Early Decision contract to wait a few days in the interest of alleviating my curiosity?

If the answer is yes, I can accept that. I'm just a bit surprised that people think this is a completely invalid question.

I've been wondering this myself, but I'm going to say that the moral thing would be to withdraw all applications as soon as you get an ED acceptance.  BUT, I think you could get around that by arguing that you should be able to wait until financial aid comes in, because if financial aid is bad to the extent that you could not attend and you may have to pull out of the ED school, you wouldn't want to have withdrawn everywhere else.  ;-)





I award you no points....ahh @#!* it, you know the rest.

It's not the question people have a problem with. It's the fact that you're seeking validation, for what you freely admit, is your own vanity.

Grow up.