Law School Discussion

If I get into to my ED school, how soon must I withdraw my other applications?

ClashCityRocker

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I applied early decision to Columbia, and I'm looking forward to hearing back from them in the next few weeks. Not to count my chickens, but my prospects are looking mighty fine. However, I know that, if Columbia accepts me, I'm supposed to withdraw my other applications. How long do I have to do that? A day? A week?
If accepted, I'll be very excited to matriculate at Columbia. The only problem is, I'm more than a little curious to know where else I could get in, and my mom really wants to know if I'm Harvard material. I'm not entertaining thoughts of going there - I'd just like to see if I could get in. Absolute vanity. So do I have a grace period in which I can let my other applications sit, just so I can see if I get any other acceptances? How immediate does that "immediate" withdrawal of other applications have to be?

bt

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I've been wondering this myself, but I'm going to say that the moral thing would be to withdraw all applications as soon as you get an ED acceptance.  BUT, I think you could get around that by arguing that you should be able to wait until financial aid comes in, because if financial aid is bad to the extent that you could not attend and you may have to pull out of the ED school, you wouldn't want to have withdrawn everywhere else.  ;-)

that's called lying.  be grateful and keep your word.

ClashCityRocker

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Good point about the financial aid thing - although, when I applied ED to Columbia, I did so knowing full well that it would really hurt my chances of getting financial aid.
I just want an extra week or ten days. Is that so much to ask?

Navlaw

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I am pretty sure when you sign that binding agreement you can't withdraw and go somewhere else, even if it isn't enough money. You need to withdraw from all other schools when you get in ED.

bt

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Haha I mean I've given you the best argument I can to say that it wouldn't be "immoral" (or wrong) to keep your apps in at schools after you get in ED at a school.  Ultimately, it's your decision.  As far as how schools will feel about it, a week is not very long and unless you get a phone call it would be very easy to claim that you didn't check your mail/email that week.  Since Columbia gives ED decisions by mail (I believe) you'll be fine to hold your app in at other schools for a week or so.  But again, it's not really right, unless you want to try to make the financial aid argument.

Matthies

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There are these things called binding contracts, Iím not really sure how they work, I did not pay much attention in that class, but they kind of mean you gotta do what you said you were gonna do when you asked them to do something for you. Or something like that. I dunno Iím sure they teach it at Columbia still its kind of a big law thingy.

ClashCityRocker

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Hmm. These aren't really the answers I'm looking for. It's not a question of whether or not I'm going to hold on to my other applications through February and March, or whether I'm considering attending these other schools. As I mentioned before, I'm asking how soon those applications need to be withdrawn, as in, within twelve hours, or within one week?

Haha I mean I've given you the best argument I can to say that it wouldn't be "immoral" (or wrong) to keep your apps in at schools after you get in ED at a school.  Ultimately, it's your decision.  As far as how schools will feel about it, a week is not very long and unless you get a phone call it would be very easy to claim that you didn't check your mail/email that week.  Since Columbia gives ED decisions by mail (I believe) you'll be fine to hold your app in at other schools for a week or so.  But again, it's not really right, unless you want to try to make the financial aid argument.

this is the most god-damndest ass-backwards line or ethical thinking i believe i've ever encountered.  really, it's just childish.  as far as i can tell (i've only read it twice) it goes something like this:  "okay, it's not really wrong to not do something which you said you would do, as long as you lie well enough for them not to know that you didn't do it."  this is freakin' retarded.  no wonder there's such a massive amount of disrespect for lawyers and the profession in general...  people who find this type of logic okay (i'm gonna do what i want, right and wrong be damned) have something coming to them... eventually you will make a mistake with your cover-up lies, and this kind of decision making will come back to haunt you at some point.

for society's sake, i hope it's sooner rather than later, when other people's vitality is at stake...

Hmm. These aren't really the answers I'm looking for. It's not a question of whether or not I'm going to hold on to my other applications through February and March, or whether I'm considering attending these other schools. As I mentioned before, I'm asking how soon those applications need to be withdrawn, as in, within twelve hours, or within one week?

Why don't you read the contract that you signed?  What does it say?