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Author Topic: Interesting Courses v. Bar-Preparation Courses  (Read 2895 times)

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Re: Interesting Courses v. Bar-Preparation Courses
« Reply #10 on: December 01, 2008, 09:29:09 PM »
Go for the courses that are substantive and theory-based.

A course that might help prep for the bar, you may neverthelss run into when BarBri rolls around.

I will finally sink my teeth into trusts and estates, this spring after a long delay.

Thistle

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Re: Interesting Courses v. Bar-Preparation Courses
« Reply #11 on: December 01, 2008, 10:56:06 PM »
i took the fun ones, and full loads during the summer.  i need 5 hours to graduate, and wont even have a paper due next semester, let alone an exam.

i am auditing commercial paper, secure transactions, and decedents estates however.  no exams, just do the reading and show up for class; and no worries about tanking my gpa.
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JD

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Re: Interesting Courses v. Bar-Preparation Courses
« Reply #12 on: December 03, 2008, 10:00:44 PM »
It all depends.  If you go to a top 20 law school and you're not in the bottom 20% of the class.  Take what's fun and interesting.  If you go to a Tier 2, 3, 4, and you're in the bottom 1/3 of the class, take as many bar classes as you can.   

There are about 20 bar exam subjects and you have only about three months to master them all.  I would be helpful if you have taken a full semester for certain subjects, especially evidence. 

This advice seems ridiculous.  The amount of bar study time and necessity to take bar classes in law school depend upon the person.  What law school or what law school grades someone achieves has no bearing.

I did not go to a top 50 law school.  I did not take many bar subjects (secured, commercial paper, wills/trusts/estates, etc..).  I did not take a barbri review course.  I self studied 1-week for the bar.  I passed comfortably.

As far as my recommendation: 
-Taking bar courses will likely lessen the amount of time you have to study, because you will not have to learn any new concepts (rather just refresh and review). 
-Take evidence regardless.  Evidence should be required at every school due to its importance.  Also, evidence is on the MBE and a potential essay question so it is more heavily tested.
-Take criminal procedure.  Crim pro is also on the MBE and who doesnt want to know their search and seizure rights anyway?
-You don't need to take every bar course.  In fact, many bar courses are rarely tested (you have to check with the individual state...but for instance, in colorado, commercial paper and secured transactions are tested much less frequently than bus org).
-Make sure to take classes you like and in fact those classes might still help you on the bar.  (CO bar had an admin question. I knew the answer based upon what I learned in public lands, environmental law and mining law.)

CoxlessPair

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Re: Interesting Courses v. Bar-Preparation Courses
« Reply #13 on: December 03, 2008, 11:35:02 PM »
It all depends.  If you go to a top 20 law school and you're not in the bottom 20% of the class.  Take what's fun and interesting.  If you go to a Tier 2, 3, 4, and you're in the bottom 1/3 of the class, take as many bar classes as you can.   

There are about 20 bar exam subjects and you have only about three months to master them all.  I would be helpful if you have taken a full semester for certain subjects, especially evidence. 
I self studied 1-week for the bar.  I passed comfortably.

I call bull on the 1 week studying. There is no way that is sufficient. Colorado has an 81% pass rate for 1st time takers in July, not exactly an easy jurisdiction.
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SCOOTERNINJA

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Re: Interesting Courses v. Bar-Preparation Courses
« Reply #14 on: December 04, 2008, 08:10:29 PM »
I call bull on the 1 week studying. There is no way that is sufficient. Colorado has an 81% pass rate for 1st time takers in July, not exactly an easy jurisdiction.

Not sure where you get your information, but the july 1st time pass rate was like 86%.  In fact, I only know 2 people who did not pass it.  I only took CO bar, but IMO it is an easy jurisdiction, because the only state specific subject is family law (not even tested in july).  WY and NV are known to be much more difficult bars in the area.

As far as 1-week, I wouldn't recommend it to many people. It worked for me.  Plenty of people who I did way better than in law school scored higher than me on the bar, but my only goal was to pass. 

SentenceReform

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Re: Interesting Courses v. Bar-Preparation Courses
« Reply #15 on: December 06, 2008, 10:53:43 AM »
There is no definitive answer as to whether one should bar-oriented courses or what they're interested in.  I knew people who took a ton of bar-oriented courses and passed; I also knew people who took non-bar-oriented courses and passed.

I think it depends on the person.  If you want to feel more comfortable heading into Bar Review, then definitely take more bar-oriented courses.

Some courses that I would recommend:  Secured Transactions, a UCC Article 2 class, Evidence, and Crim Pro

Secured Transactions appears in essays and Article 2 stuff appears on MBE.  If you know that stuff before Bar Review, then you can focus on learning other subjects (like Family Law, etc) during Barbri.

Evidence is tough -- but, if you know it well, it will cut down on study time.  A basic Crim Pro class will also be helpful.

I passed the bar without having taken: Wills/Trusts, Family Law, Commercial Paper, and Conflicts in law school.  I reviewed with Barbri and felt pretty comfortable about answering questions in those areas.  However, I knew Article 2, Secured Transactions, Evidence, and Crim Pro pretty well going into bar prep-- so, I didn't have to focus on those areas for BarReview, which definitely helped me in overall preparation.

p.s., If I had to do it over, I would probably take a Wills/Trusts class in Law school, since that seems to be a pretty heavily tested area for the bar.  As I recall, I spent a good amount of time trying to memorize the Barbi outlines for Wills and Trusts.