Law School Discussion

ABA v. Non-ABA Law School

Re: ABA v. Non-ABA Law School
« Reply #10 on: November 26, 2008, 02:01:14 PM »
This has to be a flame.  Does anyone think that a 3.97/166 really would go to a non-ABA school?  Aren't those numbers good enough for a full-ride at Alabama?  If not Alabama, probably some lower-end tier 1 school will give her a full-ride and she's definitely got good enough numbers for a T20 (if not higher).

Just can't be true.

Re: ABA v. Non-ABA Law School
« Reply #11 on: November 26, 2008, 02:26:58 PM »
This has to be a flame.  Does anyone think that a 3.97/166 really would go to a non-ABA school?  Aren't those numbers good enough for a full-ride at Alabama?  If not Alabama, probably some lower-end tier 1 school will give her a full-ride and she's definitely got good enough numbers for a T20 (if not higher).

Just can't be true.

hesitate to say CAN NOT, but pretty much agree.

Re: ABA v. Non-ABA Law School
« Reply #12 on: November 26, 2008, 05:25:24 PM »
If this is true, this should warm the hearts of every fellow applicant.

Essentially: yes, people are this stupid.

Ninja1

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Re: ABA v. Non-ABA Law School
« Reply #13 on: November 26, 2008, 10:51:30 PM »
This has to be a flame.  Does anyone think that a 3.97/166 really would go to a non-ABA school?  Aren't those numbers good enough for a full-ride at Alabama?  If not Alabama, probably some lower-end tier 1 school will give her a full-ride and she's definitely got good enough numbers for a T20 (if not higher).

Just can't be true.

People do dumb *&^% all the time.

Re: ABA v. Non-ABA Law School
« Reply #14 on: November 27, 2008, 06:03:45 AM »
This has to be a flame.  Does anyone think that a 3.97/166 really would go to a non-ABA school?  Aren't those numbers good enough for a full-ride at Alabama?  If not Alabama, probably some lower-end tier 1 school will give her a full-ride and she's definitely got good enough numbers for a T20 (if not higher).

Just can't be true.

I agree, Ninja, completely.  But for some reason, this baffles me.  I just wouldn't think anyone would think the benefit of going to a non-ABA school outweighed going to a decent, top school.

I could understand if the person was choosing between full-price at a tier 4 school and the cheaper tuition at a non-ABA school.

What usually happens in this case is that someone is enamored by one person's story they hear.  They might meet someone or hear about someone who went to a non-ABA school and who said that going to that school was the best decision of his/her life because of x, y, z.

Still, for the OP's friend's sake, I hope she does a little more digging before she decides to enroll in any school.
People do dumb poo all of the time.

bloomlaw

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Re: ABA v. Non-ABA Law School
« Reply #15 on: November 28, 2008, 12:10:58 AM »
it seems to me she thinks she is "fighting the system" or "sticking it to the man" by not playing the admissions/LSAT/statistics game... kinda like the indie bands that refuse to sign with corporate record labels out of principle.

It's plausible, but completely retarded.

Re: ABA v. Non-ABA Law School
« Reply #16 on: June 25, 2009, 10:22:27 PM »
I have mixed thoughts here.... I am a NON-ABA 1L. Your friend can do well as a non-aba lawyer, but with her numbers why would she even think about a non-aba school??? Does not make sense to me. Unfortunately, Miles has to be the worst of the worst non-aba schools in America let alone the Alabama. I think think their BAR pass rate is like 5% or something...

However - to the naysayers of NON-ABA schools - I chose the non-aba school I go to for several reasons:
- I was TOLD by ABA UA and CUMBERLAND grads to go here
- I will not graduate with any debt, because I can pay for my tuition ($2000)each semester
- I work a full time professional job 40+ hours a week and go to school 2 hours a night 4 nights a week
- I am taught by real (daily) practicing attorneys who give much more insight into what the REAL legal is all about by case name and their involvement.
- I will not need a BIG firm to bail my ass out of student loan payments while I work 80 hours a week for them for the next 5-10 years hoping that they MIGHT make me partner.

Legal work is there. If you have what it takes, then you have what it takes to be a success in the legal profession. You don't have to kiss a named partners ass in order to be a good lawyer.

My success as an attorney depends on me - not on whether I can get an ABA sticker on my BAR Card.... oh wait, there is no such thing. BTW - federal is federal regardless.

yongsoo

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Re: ABA v. Non-ABA Law School
« Reply #17 on: June 28, 2009, 09:33:21 AM »
My success as an attorney depends on me - not on whether I can get an ABA sticker on my BAR Card.... oh wait, there is no such thing. BTW - federal is federal regardless.

As many people have said, if you have not graduated from an ABA Approved school, you are not eligible to take the bar in many states. That ABA Approved "sticker" on your bar application keeps all doors open. Whereas, NON-ABA cuts out a lot of the US

http://www.abanet.org/legaled/publications/compguide2005/chart3.pdf

You can be ranked number 1 in your law school class, but that's not going to let you sit for the bar in Delaware. facts are facts regardless.

Re: ABA v. Non-ABA Law School
« Reply #18 on: July 05, 2009, 06:45:43 PM »
I agree that the ABA sticker will let take the BAR pretty much anywhere. BUT!!! for us non-aba students, we are in law schools in the State where we ARE GOING to practice.

I looked into non-aba/other states practice, and the rules have relaxed somewhat. After certain requirements, like practicing in state X for 5 years, MANY states will let you sit for their bar. It's besides the point for me, because I am here and I will never leave this State. But I do concede point however. -sa

Re: ABA v. Non-ABA Law School
« Reply #19 on: August 16, 2009, 07:45:27 PM »
Her issue was mainly financial and the fact that her success as an attorney should not depend on where she went to school. She decided to attend California School of Law!

It was mp fluke! To her it was more about proving a point about ABA v. Non-ABA Law Schools! Honestly I have seen attorneys who went ABA Approved schools that make me wonder how and why? We'll just have to wait and see!