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Author Topic: Spotting all issues and the time factor  (Read 1795 times)

The Artist

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Spotting all issues and the time factor
« on: November 09, 2008, 02:45:35 AM »
I have two questions for 2Ls and older:

1) Would you say most students spot all the issues on exams? What percentage of students would you guess are able to spot all the issues?

2) How big of a factor is time pressure on exams? If (hypothetically) you were able to get 1.5 times the regularly alloted time, would you expect a student to get top 10% as a result (I know there is no chance in hell I'll be able to get extra time, but I'm just curious if the time factor is as big of a cause of students doing poorly as not spotting all the issues).

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Re: Spotting all issues and the time factor
« Reply #1 on: November 09, 2008, 02:46:52 AM »
tag.

jacy85

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Re: Spotting all issues and the time factor
« Reply #2 on: November 09, 2008, 08:02:53 AM »
This is hard to answer, really.  I'd like to say that most people spot the majority of the issues, but I'm not sure.  I think a good number of people do miss issues - either they forgot a major subject, and thus didn't realize it was an issue, they were extremely nervous and didn't really read the sentence that presented the issue, etc.  I think a lot of people also miss smaller issues, perhaps intentionally.  One of my 1L exams was written as a time crunch - the prof told us it would be pretty much impossible to finish.  I had to rank/outline my answer first so I covered the biggest stuff, and then did as much of the smaller issues as I had time for.

But spotting every single issue isn't always necessary for a good grade.  I got an A- on a 1L exam where I missed an important, albeit simple, issue.  And I know that there are other exams where people wrote about things that I didn't, and I still got a very high grade (although I don't know what those other people got).

Sorry to not give a more concert answer; I really don't know what percentage get all the issues.  So take all this for what it's worth.  I think to get the kind of answer you're looking for, you need to find a prof willing to discuss it, since they're the ones that grade the exams.

As for time, I think that varies by person.  Time was rarely an issue for me; most exams I finished with enough time to proof read, etc., and I did very well on my exams.  But other people found the timing a huge challenged, and suffered under the crunch.  So while I don't know that extra time would have helped me perform any better than I already did, I think others would have really benefited.

resipsaloquitur

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Re: Spotting all issues and the time factor
« Reply #3 on: November 09, 2008, 09:49:03 AM »
I have no idea about percentages either and would just be making that up.

I think extra time would have helped me on the exams where I screwed up my allocation of time, but if I had stuck to my plan for the time, it would have been enough. Budget your time in advance for each issue you spot and when that time has been met, move on regardless of whether you did as complete an analysis as you could have.

I failed to do so on one exam and got really burned on the essay portion of the exam.

Changed Name

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Re: Spotting all issues and the time factor
« Reply #4 on: November 09, 2008, 09:59:36 AM »
This is hard to answer, really.  I'd like to say that most people spot the majority of the issues, but I'm not sure.  I think a good number of people do miss issues - either they forgot a major subject, and thus didn't realize it was an issue, they were extremely nervous and didn't really read the sentence that presented the issue, etc.  I think a lot of people also miss smaller issues, perhaps intentionally.  One of my 1L exams was written as a time crunch - the prof told us it would be pretty much impossible to finish.  I had to rank/outline my answer first so I covered the biggest stuff, and then did as much of the smaller issues as I had time for.

But spotting every single issue isn't always necessary for a good grade.  I got an A- on a 1L exam where I missed an important, albeit simple, issue.  And I know that there are other exams where people wrote about things that I didn't, and I still got a very high grade (although I don't know what those other people got).

Sorry to not give a more concert answer; I really don't know what percentage get all the issues.  So take all this for what it's worth.  I think to get the kind of answer you're looking for, you need to find a prof willing to discuss it, since they're the ones that grade the exams.

As for time, I think that varies by person.  Time was rarely an issue for me; most exams I finished with enough time to proof read, etc., and I did very well on my exams.  But other people found the timing a huge challenged, and suffered under the crunch.  So while I don't know that extra time would have helped me perform any better than I already did, I think others would have really benefited.

Hey, Jacy.

Quick question for you:  I know you were a big proponent of LEEWS (actually the reason that I got it).  Did you follow that method perfectly or change it up?  I like it (I haven't finished the Audio set, yet) but it just seems as though the planning stages will take an inordinate amount of time and I fear that I may regress into old poor habits.

Thanks!

CN

jacy85

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Re: Spotting all issues and the time factor
« Reply #5 on: November 09, 2008, 02:33:29 PM »
This is hard to answer, really.  I'd like to say that most people spot the majority of the issues, but I'm not sure.  I think a good number of people do miss issues - either they forgot a major subject, and thus didn't realize it was an issue, they were extremely nervous and didn't really read the sentence that presented the issue, etc.  I think a lot of people also miss smaller issues, perhaps intentionally.  One of my 1L exams was written as a time crunch - the prof told us it would be pretty much impossible to finish.  I had to rank/outline my answer first so I covered the biggest stuff, and then did as much of the smaller issues as I had time for.

But spotting every single issue isn't always necessary for a good grade.  I got an A- on a 1L exam where I missed an important, albeit simple, issue.  And I know that there are other exams where people wrote about things that I didn't, and I still got a very high grade (although I don't know what those other people got).

Sorry to not give a more concert answer; I really don't know what percentage get all the issues.  So take all this for what it's worth.  I think to get the kind of answer you're looking for, you need to find a prof willing to discuss it, since they're the ones that grade the exams.

As for time, I think that varies by person.  Time was rarely an issue for me; most exams I finished with enough time to proof read, etc., and I did very well on my exams.  But other people found the timing a huge challenged, and suffered under the crunch.  So while I don't know that extra time would have helped me perform any better than I already did, I think others would have really benefited.

Hey, Jacy.

Quick question for you:  I know you were a big proponent of LEEWS (actually the reason that I got it).  Did you follow that method perfectly or change it up?  I like it (I haven't finished the Audio set, yet) but it just seems as though the planning stages will take an inordinate amount of time and I fear that I may regress into old poor habits.

Thanks!

CN

I didn't think planning took too much time.  I would mark up my exam and make notes in the margins as I read through the fact pattern, and then take the time to roughly sketch/outline my answer.  I don't know that I did it exactly the same way as the program, as it's been quite a while now since I listened to it.  But I think you should let the program work for you, and find a way to outline/plan your answers in a way that you're comfortable.  The program's best parts are the basic methods and principles, and I think there's room for making it your own.

But as for whether or not you will have enough time to plan/outline, I think you absolutely will.  Everyone has to sit and think about what to write, which issue is important, etc.  The problem with doing it as your write on the fly is that you'll miss things, you'll be disorganized, etc.  You're just moving all that planning to the front end.  You'll write just as much, and you'll be more efficient, IMO.

And, I think in most cases, even IF you don't have time to cover 1 issue that someone else who dove right in did, you're answer will likely be better organized with a more thorough analysis.  In most cases, if you cover 5 issues very well, w/ nice organization that makes it easy for the professor to read and grade, you'll get more points in the matrix than someone who covered 6 issues haphazardly with poor organization.

DonaldDarko

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Re: Spotting all issues and the time factor
« Reply #6 on: November 09, 2008, 03:43:24 PM »
One prof told us that nobody gets every one of the potential issues...there are always more than the prof was thinking of or was looking for.

Another prof told us that if you spot and thoroughly treat even 30% of all the conceivable issues, you'd get an A.

I'm sure it differs from prof to prof, though.

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Re: Spotting all issues and the time factor
« Reply #7 on: November 09, 2008, 03:49:55 PM »
Our professor told us that Donnie Darko is a bad movie and that Joy Division is TTT.

Varies, I guess.

DonaldDarko

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Re: Spotting all issues and the time factor
« Reply #8 on: November 09, 2008, 04:55:54 PM »
Yeah, Donnie Darko f-ing sucks. I don't know why I punched that in as my username. Must have been the last movie I saw at the time.